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Thread: paint shelf life

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    crooklyn,ny
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    241

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    have some exp. 2 part marine paints that i have stored in various places like in the back of a texas caddi during the winter at times, other times in the basement. Looked at the contents of the cans - look good, stirs well. I'll try them but does anyone know of the conditions a paint can be stored in before use as long as it has had time to adjust to weather conditions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
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    5,570

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    The normal shelf life of paint is three to five years (for enamels and acrylics), depending on how it's stored. In a cool, dry spot is best. Store off the floor during winter.

    The volume of air above the opened paint should be reduced as much as possible, if practical. Often it is more cost efficient to use fresh paint if you are a polyurethane user.

    If you store fresh paint in a cool, dry place, its shelf life could be longer than five years. Invert the can for long term storage and intermittently stir the paint (essential).

    If paint sits for years, the chemicals in it can break down and fall from suspension and can be difficult to reblend or they can set in the can. Like Deks Olje does.

    Always test old paint on scrap timber, let it dry for a couple of days and if it sets okay (it will not harden fully in such a short time), you can be happy that it is generally OK.

    Old paint can benefit from filtering (using a commercial paint filter or even a few layers of panty hose) to remove artifacts. All paint both old and new needs filtering, if you are after a premier paint job

    I don't store opened 2 pack water based polyurethane or poly/oil blend varnish because open cans are only good for about 2-4 weeks of storage with the clear, about 2-4 months with the coloured polies and the poly/oil blend varnish (at best). Our air temperatures here can be very hot during summer, no stored paints cope well over here ... unless in controlled environments like 20C with +/- 5C.

    Warren.

    [ 03-01-2005, 05:28 PM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Saltspring Is. BC
    Posts
    130

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    One thing that I've found helps with paint storage is to displace the air with propane before the lid goes on. It keeps the surface of the paint from filmming over.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
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    Here are more storage aids following Stan's advice.

    You can blow into the can before putting the lid on it to allow carbon dioxide from your breath to displace the air in the can. This will slow down the oxidizing of the paint.

    One can pour a layer of solvent onto the oil based paints. But not the solvent called 'water' (for all you keen water based users out there).

    Cutting a piece of wax paper the same size as the inside diameter of the can and placing it on top of the paint slows the oxidizing or use gladwrap film (as I do) for short term storage.

    Also, there is a commercial product you can use called Finish Preserve (or a similar product, as already mentioned by Stan). Finish Preserve is a blend of inert gases, nitrogen, argon and carbon dioxide, in a pressurized can. When the gas is introduced into a paint can, it evacuates the oxygen and covers the paint with an inert gas layer.

    Warren.

    [ 03-01-2005, 06:36 PM: Message edited by: Wild Wassa ]

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