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Thread: Hey BamaBoy! Das Boot wins Dragon Worlds in light going

  1. #1
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    Default Hey BamaBoy! Das Boot wins Dragon Worlds in light going

    2007 Dragon World Championships: Germans conquer in Ireland. Last time they tried that (WWI) they failed miserably.

    Here's their boat set up for light air speed-
    "Now and then we had a hope that if we lived and were good, God would permit us to be pirates." ~ Mark Twain


  2. #2
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    Default It's not THAT light!

    If it was what I would call light they wouldn't all be on the deck like that.

    I do study the pictures quite a bit because it really helps with things like leech and halyard tension, luff tension on the main, that sort of thing.

    Nice boat, eh?

    Mickey Lake

  3. #3
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    Default

    I think of anything less than whitecaps as 'light'. Not strictly accurate perhaps, but....

    Yes- a very nice boat. Clean, functional, spare, powerful.

    Good picture, too. It captures the skipper focussing on the jib luff and waves immediately ahead, the main trimmer hunkered down driving the rig and the jib man with one eye to weather and a hand on the sheet. Very cool.
    Last edited by rbgarr; 09-14-2007 at 04:57 AM.
    "Now and then we had a hope that if we lived and were good, God would permit us to be pirates." ~ Mark Twain


  4. #4
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    Default Do you see how the Tactick is moulded into....

    the coachroof? I really like that, but I think that I like the way that Joop Doomernik does it even better. It is lower profile and is moulded into the shelf for the control lines (iirc).

    Sometimes I feel as though I am talking to the walls around here, but these ARE very beautiful, though very functional, boats. Thank you for posting that photo, Dave.

    Mickey Lake

  5. #5
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    Default

    I like the way the lazy runner is restrained, I wonder what they do downwind. See they're set up for a starboard rounding.

    I'd like to sail against the king of Alabama as opposed to the king of Denmark

    Can you smell the Guinness in that photograph

  6. #6
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    Default

    What's the gimmick inside the vang?.Looks like a double glass strut like you get on roller furling booms.

  7. #7
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    Default

    My guess would be a boomkicker, eliminates the topping lift


  8. #8
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    Default

    that would be it
    Surpised to see it on a race boat like that though.Common?

  9. #9
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    Default Yeah, he is set up to round.....

    to starboard and he overlaid slightly. Very good picture of a team working together, as Dave said. The bungees on the backstay keep the leeward stay away from the boom so that you don't have to let it out too far. We just have the one bungee on my boat.

    The boomkicker is a fairly recent thing, from Petticrows I would assume. We only have one US boat rigged like that. Well, one US boat that's actually in the US, there are a couple in Europe. I am not really sure of the advantage but I will see it for myself if I do get to go to the UK in the spring.

    The thing that really strikes me about that boat is the high floors and the crew placement like it's a big dinghy rather than a small keelboat. On my boat you are very far down in the hull while crewing and there is one thwart in the crew area that you share in light air or use as a step to get on deck. The higher floor makes it a completely different boat.

    You also don't see any winches on that boat, do you?

    Right now there is a bit of a debate going on as to whether or not we should go ahead and lighten up the boats? Of course, this would pretty much make anything built since 1928 obsolete, but at least a wee part fo the argument is that there is a pretty large amount of turnover as far as boats go anyway, so why not just draw a line in the sand and begin again. The builders believe that they can bring the boats in a good bit under1750kg and still maintain hull integrity. They're probably right. I believe that any of us with boats built prior to a cut-off year would be considered 'classics'. Personally I don't think that it would effect the size of the fleets at the higher levels that much, as the majority of those boats sailing in the major events are five years old or less, but it would certainly make doing things on a local level interesting. How do I treat a guy who just bought the first US or Canadian boat who wants to come race with our antiques? Ah well, I am sure that guidance will come from above!

    Oh yeah. I appreciate the compliment Gareth, but I'D like to sail against HRH Prince Henrik at least once. He at least actually does drive his own boat. Big supporters of Borresen's. Anyway, if you study the results from the World's you will see that the guys who made the trip from Hong Kong (or in Phyllis' case, the lady) and from Oz, finished at the bottom of the table. This class has become highly professional in Europe. These guys are sailing in 70 boat fleets once a month all over the continent. Having done that a couple of times in Stars I can say that it is a different sort of sailing and one that takes a lot of time to get used to. For guys like me it would be a real treat. A once-in-every-so-often vacation, boat show, sailing school, and a chance to beat a boat or two. For Markus Wieser or Tommy Mueller, or even for someone like the American Ted Sawyer, it's a job. At the least, a part-time job. I'd love to do it but I have no illusions of how I'd finish. It's be just another opportunity to learn something.

    Mickey Lake
    Last edited by bamamick; 09-14-2007 at 11:57 AM.

  10. #10
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    Default

    If your going to lighten them up, you might as well buy an SB3.

    Dragons are heavy, that's the point. Of course if they lightened the hull and rig and put the savings in the ballast, then that would be different, but not necessarily better. I posted a picture of the Danish Royal Yacht in another post--pretty cool way to arrive at a regatta, even for this small "r" republican.


  11. #11
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    Default

    How can you tell he overlaid?

  12. #12
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    Default I don't know how much of a weight .....

    difference we are talking about. It may be that the builders just want to stop putting corrector weights in them? I think that I read somewhere that one of the boats had over 20kg of correctors in it. We may be talking about less than 100 pounds?

    He looks to me that he has freed up the jib leech a wee bit? Of course we all overlay a little. If he's got his pole rigged then he is close enough that he is probably right on where he wants to be. Right about then is when I forgot that something is not run correctly or isn't tied up like I want it, or....something. If races consisted of first beats then I would be a pretty decent Dragon sailor .

    Mickey Lake

  13. #13
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    Default

    It looks like there's a spinnaker launch chute in the bow. Is that pretty much how it's done in the modern boats?
    "Now and then we had a hope that if we lived and were good, God would permit us to be pirates." ~ Mark Twain


  14. #14
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    Default Yep.

    I believe that we borrowed that idea from the FD's. I've even got one on my boat. That's how we keep tearing the chute. The sail has a retrieval line on the inside about dead center. When you drop the chute one guy feeds the halyard and the other pulls the retrieval line, which sucks the sail down into the launching tube. If you do it right you never have to worry about a wrap and it is wonderful. If the person feeding the sheets and halyard doesn't keep the right amount of tension on the sail as it feeds into the launcher you can wrap it on the bow and it'll get torn. I have done this twice. And just so you'll know, the second time that we did it I was the guy doing the feeding!

    My door doesn't work too well. The doors on the new boats work so very much better than does mine. I have to use about a half a can of McLube per day on that rascal.

    Mickey Lake

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