Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 67 of 67

Thread: Xynole polyester cloth

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,726

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    I thought you already knew it was polyester, that part's not a secret (and FYI Dynel is acrylic). I agree that it is most likely made for some general purpose which has been marked up for the boat industry, but the actual cost of it and its other properties are much harder to nail down.

    Keep in mind that some peel-ply fabrics are also polyester and used as such because epoxy will not stick to them. There are most likely far more versions of polyester fabrics out there that will make decent substitutes for peel-ply than make good substitutes for Xynole and that's the problem here as their use for boat sheathing would have some rather obvious drawbacks.

    Even fiberglass fabrics have to be treated with specific compounds (Volan, Silane, etc.) before resin will bond well to them. Grabbing a hunk of fabric that looks similar to Xynole and sticking it to your boat without doing some pretty serious testing first is probably a big mistake. Whether the same treatments that allow resin to bond well to Xynole happen to be commonly used on other polyester fabrics you might find is hard to say, but assuming that all polyester or any similar-looking polyester will work as a substitute for Xynole is very foolish. It's certainly worth doing some adhesion, compatibility and tear strength testing with some promising-looking potential substitutes and comparing them to actual Xynole in the same tests, but just because it's polyester doesn't mean that it will work. There are hundreds of polyester variations. It's like saying "This sailboat mast is made of wood - You guys can spend your money on Spruce and Doug Fir if you want, but I can make a replacement out of any type of wood I can dig up and it should work just fine." We all know the outcome of that one.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Cebu City, Philippines
    Posts
    236

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Well I went out and bought myself some xynole from Defender, to see for myself was this mystery fabric was. I mean really, what is this fabric that is only available from only two sources in world, and that no textile manufacture anywhere makes?
    Of course a textile maker manufactures it! It's made right there in the USA as a matter of fact.

    My next step was to bring my sample around to a friend of mine who works in the textile business. Despite being in the business for almost twenty years he had never heard of xynole ...
    No surprise to me. When I contacted the manufacturer they didn't know what the term "Xynole" referred to either. After I told them Defender buys it from them, they said Defender buys only two fabrics from them, and from my description they figured out which one it was -- the polyester fabric, not the other one (Dynel) which is a combination of two different types of plastic threads.

    They gave me their product number for what the boating industry calls Xynole so I wouldn't cause any more confusion by calling it Xynole when talking to them about it. They will make it and sell it to anyone of course, you just have to buy a HUGE roll (or multiple rolls) of the stuff.

    So it turns out that xynole also goes by the less sexy name of "polyester".
    Exactly. Polyester comes in a wide variety of weaves too, so it would make sense to know the correct Xynole weave, thread count, etc. before using just any old generic polyester fabric. Open weave is critical for any Xynole substitute though ...

    ... and FYI Dynel is acrylic ...
    Dynel is actually a combination fabric made with polyester and acrylic, or acrylic and olefin, or two other plastic fibers -- I just don't recall which ones at the moment. That's what I get for growing old, I can't recall all my facts as quickly as I used to ...

    I agree that it is most likely made for some general purpose which has been marked up for the boat industry, but the actual cost of it and its other properties are much harder to nail down.
    In Asia the cost of bulk commodity fabrics like fiberglass and polyester are based on material weight, with adjustments made for the extra cost of certain types of weaves. You can pretty much count on the fact that a plain weave will cost roughly $X.XX per kilogram from nearly all suppliers, and satin weave $Y.YY, and herringbone weave $Z.ZZ for example.

    Keep in mind that some peel-ply fabrics are also polyester and used as such because epoxy will not stick to them.
    Let's not forget that one of the other critically important features of peel-ply which makes it work the way it does (in addition to the fact that it is polyester) is the fact that it is a very tight weave material which is very effective at preventing epoxy from getting in between the woven threads. My personal belief is that it's the tight weave that results in so little epoxy gets in between these threads, and this means the fabric is stronger than the epoxy in this area -- and that's why the epoxy rips apart rather than the peel-ply when you try to remove the peel-ply.

    On the other hand, Xynole is such an open weave that plenty of epoxy gets in between the threads. Wth so much more epoxy bonding in between the threads, the epoxy ends up being stronger than the Xynole when you try to peel it off. I believe that any time the epoxy is stronger than the fabric, it's the fabric that will fail when you try to peel it off, not the epoxy. Open weave won't peel off, but closed weave will. That's about the size of it.

    It's certainly worth doing some adhesion, compatibility and tear strength testing with some promising-looking potential substitutes and comparing them to actual Xynole in the same tests, but just because it's polyester doesn't mean that it will work.
    The cheap closed weave polyester I bought in the local fabric store for 20 cents a square meter certainly works great as peel ply!

    I bought some open weave polyester to try as a Xynole substitute too but I haven't used it yet, so my personal tests have yet to be commenced. Unfortunately I couldn't compare generic open weave polyester to Xynole anyways since I have no "Xynole" ... but I don't think a direct comparison is necessary anyways. If I cannot peel off the generic stuff then it will work fine as a Xynole substitute in terms of waterproofing and abrasion resistance -- and that's all Xynole is normally used for anyways.
    Kenneth Grome
    Bagacay Boatworks
    www.bagacayboatworks.com

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,726

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    "Dynel is a trade name for a type synthetic fiber used in fibre reinforced plastic composite materials, especially for marine applications. A copolymer of acrylonitrile and vinyl chloride, it shares many properties with both polyacrylonitrile (high abrasion resistance, good tensile strength) and PVC (flame resistance). It is an acrylic resin.

    Dynel was originally produced by Union Carbide corporation.

    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynel"

    "modacrylics ( in modacrylic )
    ...percent by weight of the chemical compound acrylonitrile. It is a modified form of the acrylic group, fibres composed of a minimum of 85 percent acrylonitrile. Modacrylic fibres include trademarked Dynel (acrylonitrile and polyvinyl chloride) and Verel (acrylonitrile and vinylidene chloride)." (Britanica online)

    Dacron (polyester) peel ply.
    :A layer of 2.7 oz. Dacron fabric strips or tape laminated into a layup as if it were an extra ply of glass. The peel coat wets out with epoxy like glass cloth and cures along with the rest of the layup. However, the Dacron does not adhere structurally to the glass and when peeled away it leaves a surface ready for glass-to-glass bonding without sanding." (Aircraft Spruce)

    Gougeon's is supposedly nylon and like some brands, it is treated with a release agent. In any case, you can generally squeegee resin right through the weave of most peelply (or force it through with a vacuum bagging setup) and remove excess resin. It goes right through the small spaces between the yarns and the fabric gets saturated in the process, so I don't believe your fine weave/coarse weave argument holds water. Very few polyesters are sold without going through some sort of finishing process first, either by the manufacturer of by a special finisher like Kenyon. It's quite difficult to know what may or may not have been applied to a hunk of generic polyester.

    Like I said, grabbing a hunk of fabric that looks similar to Xynole and sticking it to your boat without doing some pretty serious testing first is probably a big mistake. You also seem to be overlooking the tear strength issue. Most synthetics sacrifice a hell of a lot of structural rigidity, compared to fiberglass of a similar finished weight. The main justifications for this are increased abrasion resistance and also increased tear strength to help keep a damaged boat in one piece. As long as you're testing, it's worth doing a bit of tear strength testing as well.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    28,509

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Thread retrieved out of interest.

    In the UK we used to have a splendid product called Cascover, which was nylon cloth, applied with resorcinol resin, used as a worm shield on conventional wooden hulls as a far simpler alternative to copper sheathing, but the makers lost interest in it a few years back.

    So I was wondering if xynole does the same job - it needs to move very slightly with the hull, which Cascover did.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Chesapeake Beach, Md 20732 U.S.A.
    Posts
    26,719

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Xynole does move with the wood, which was the primary reason that I used it. But....you also have to be careful of the resin that you use. Some resins are too "stiff" or rigid, and some will flex without crazing. T-88 is minutely elastic, and was the original recommendation, but it is also a bit "thick"....and M.A.S. seems to wet out the fabric much better.
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
    ..a bad day sailing is a heckuva lot better than the best day at work.....
    Fighting Illegal immigration since 1492....
    Live your life so that whenever you lose, you're ahead."
    "If you live life right, death is a joke as far as fear is concerned."

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,609

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    pquince65
    Junior Membebr />
    Join Date: Nov 2007
    Posts: 1
    Re: Xynole polyester cloth
    I've searched for the technical article that RobB mentioned on the West System website with no luck. I'd love to get my hands on it. Does anyone know where it was published?

    Thanks.
    Sorry, but I couldn't find that damn article... so I then forgot about it. I recently came across it and can now give you the source.

    The Article was called "Testing for the Toughest Deck Coverings for Ticonderoga".... by William D. Bertelsen in West Epoxy's "Epoxyworks", issue #4 spring 1994.

    This article is very relevant to this thread in that is shows some interesting characteristics of varying fabrics in conjunction with epoxy.

    Here is the article minus a few very small photos...fyi...




    continued... the following copy and two charts show the results that helped me decide on using Xynole Polyester to sheath my hull.







    The following was an additional test that was attached with the article which is quite pertinent to this thread...



    Sorry for the delay.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 05-13-2009 at 12:01 AM.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,609

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    bump...

    r

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bacalar, Mexico
    Posts
    839

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Ok so has anyone done any testing on the "open weave" over the counter polyester fabric available at any Joanne's Fabric store verses the "authentic Xynole" prescription only marine fabric yet?

    If we can start using over the counter polyester fabric what kind of weave count are we looking at. What thread size also?

    How about a couple of photos showing Xynole and generic polyester open weave, and generic poly peelable?

    Thanks.
    Jimmy
    __________
    Loving Living on Lake Bacalar.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bacalar, Mexico
    Posts
    839

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Insistant bump!
    Jimmy
    __________
    Loving Living on Lake Bacalar.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    This is new to me, so I have done some research.
    Polyesther is still a very broad name covering very different materials.
    What I have found:
    There are indeed cheap polyester textiles out there, in the textile shop near you. I guess when the point is only to provide a material for epoxy to saturate, they can be adequate for the purpose, but I would not use them for structural components.
    Tensile strength of polyester materials are varying in a very broad range. I would say that most of them in the 70-100 MPa range, while there are products which boast ultimate tensile strength in the GPa area (like fiber glass), and there are at least one product which is told to have 3 GPa. It is (if true) better than most kevlar products, and nears carbon fiber (4-6 GPa).
    Source of information: http://www.matweb.com/

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    one foot in, one foot out
    Posts
    546

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Now and then during the summer months, a fellow sailor will come up and in hang-dog fashion confess that they sort of rammed my boat on its mooring. While my attitude is that this "goes with the territory," I'm pleased with the way that the xynole topsides nicely survives these not infrequent events. Small indentations are all that I've found--and there are more such dings that confessions. I did the entire 20' boat's exterior, though not of course brightwork, in xynole. Took lots and lots of epoxy!
    Bolger sheetply Chebacco cat-yawl
    MacGregor 1939 Sabot dink
    Hill 14' ply lapstrake canoe
    Bryan Fiddlehead

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Yea...but what does it (dynel) look like when finished? The plans for my boat http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=97513 calls for dynel/epoxy over 3/8" plywood, I guess to simulate the look of painted canvas. Frankly, I probably don't need the increased impact resistance on the deck. Wouldn't 10 oz. glass give the same look as long as I don't overdo it with the epoxy? It would be cheaper. Does anyone have pictures of dynel finished and painted in this way?

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    OK...somebody help!

    I'm experimenting with some dynel samples before applying this stuff to my deck. The beam of the boat makes in necessary to put a seam down the middle.

    This cloth frays very easily. HOW DO YOU MAKE A NEAT, BARELY VISIBLE SEAM? It doesn't handle the same as glass. How about if I commit to having a visible seam and make it neat by sandwiching the cloth ends between to deckboards before wetting out. Need advice!
    John McFadden
    Charleston

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    7,609

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    I overlapped Xynole along the keel of my flats skiff and once the Xynole was wetted out and cured for a few hours.. I used one of the Stanley cheese grater type mini planes (Shurform??about 7" long) to cut the "nubs" from the cloth... I now had an epoxy saturated fabric mostly cured...with a clean beveled edge cut by the micro plane blades. It was very simple then to apply some fairing compound along the "drop off" of the overlap ... and then I continued on with applying coats of epoxy. When finished, I had a nice uniform sheathing of Xynole with fair surface.

    I think you should use Xynole, not Dynel. . . see above in this thread... and Tom Lathrop will have some input here from his personal tests in the past.

    RodB

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Rod,

    I think that the point with my boat's design is to get it to look like painted canvas. Your method would give a strong seam but might fill in the weave too much.
    Is there otherwise a difference in how xynole and dynel handle?
    I'm going for looks more than strength with this application.

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default Xynole w/ Lindsay Lord

    Hello WoodenBoat Forum,

    This is my first post and I found the forum trying to research more on what I found in Dave Gerr's scantlings using Lindsay Lord's strip/Vectra, Dynel or Xynole cloth. It seems this technique is the most hidden secret of all time or lots of boats with all hands were lost in this second Bermuda Triangle. I found plenty in my research about the abrasive qualities of the three materials, but only this forum had anything about its use with wood as primary structure. I probably would not have been willing to try it, if it were not for Paladin singing its praises (in many posts) by actually having a large (44', I believe) boat using this technique. Along with a couple of other threads on this forum and one lone NA that sells plans using this technique... and that is all that I can find on the Internet.

    I'm working on a boat design for myself. I first did the scantlings in Gerr's foam core. I then tried the wood/fiberglass scantlings and then this Lindsay Lord technique. The bare 40' hull went from 1600 lbs to less than 900 lbs. And that includes the assumption that the 4oz Xynole cloth uses the resin of a 10 oz glass ply... (BTW, that tid-bit, I found on this forum). This is an amazing reduction! Excuse my cynicism, but its almost too good to be true!

    My question(s)...
    1) Is this for real!?
    2) The scantling don't have any details about extra plies in the bottom or keel like the foam core / glass scantling.
    3) Nothing is said about off axis plies.
    4) Nothing is even said about offsetting the seems of the 3 external / 2 internal plies I need.
    5) It just seems hard to believe that 0.375" worth of wood and 20 oz/yd^2 of cloth is good enough for the keel of a 40' foot boat.

    Repeating (in disbelief) Is this for real?

    Thank you for your help!

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    562

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Quote Originally Posted by kengrome View Post
    Greg, I haven't been able to find anything online about Xynole as a trademarked name or patented process or anything similar. This makes me wonder ...

    Did someone in the boat building industry experiment with cheap polyester fabrics a long time ago and learn that it works even better than fiberglass in terms of abrasion resistance? And might this person have coined the term "Xynole" for this common everyday fabric -- so he could buy it from the textile companies cheaply only to turn around and resell it as a 'specialty marine fabric' for a much higher price?

    I think Xynole is really nothing more than heavyweight plain weave polyester fabric -- which means it should be cheap -- and can be woven by practically any textile mill in the world.

    I have a surprise for you: When I contacted Southern Industrial Fabrics and asked about the Xynole they supply to Defender Industries they told me:

    So I went back to the Defender web site and got the detailed info for these fabrics and sent it all to Southern Industrial. They confirmed that the modacrylic they sell to Defender is Dynel and the Xynole is polyester. Surprisingly they also told me they will sell me 3000 yards (their minimum order) of the polyester for only $2.15 a yard ...

    Yes, this is the very same fabric Defender brands as "Xynole" and resells to boat builders in small quantities for $8.95 a yard!

    Knowing all this, it might 'make sense' for one or more of you to buy the minimum order of 3000 yards, hang it in your garage, and resell it to everyone else for twice the price. You'll be able to use as much as you want for all your new boat building projects, and you would be doing a favor to the small boating community in the USA by providing them with an affordable source for Xynole at about half its regular retail price.

    I have come across someone who sells "Xynole" aka polyester in small quantities i.e. less than 3000 yards.

    Sweet Composites (with which I have no affiliation) sells what sounds to be Xynole under its the non-sexy name of polyester at competitive prices, especially if you are buying more than 20 yards of the stuff. Might be worth at look for those in the market. Note that their width is 47"

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,514

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth


  19. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Newport News, VA
    Posts
    2,616

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    So what about a fabric store open weave polyester fabric?
    We need some feedback.

    After searching high and low for "xynole" and finding nothing as far trademarks or anything else for that matter, I was getting the feeling that this stuff is simply polyester, pure and simple, you appear to have confirmed my suspicions
    I guess one can sell "Xynole" at $8.00/yard a lot easier than selling polyester at $8.00/yard.

    I think it's time for some experimentation on my part, i.e. buy some "xynole" and buy some plain polyester fabric and see what's what.

  20. #55

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    To anyone who has actually used the xynole fabric referenced in this thread.........can you ID for me which is the same one being referenced in this thread?

    One came from Defender.......the other from Raka. Both were sold as xynole. They are NOT the same fabric.

    One on the right has a distinct white thread that remains visible, after wetout. One on the left has a remnant of the weave left visible, but no clear thread evident and is pretty much translucent and has a rough, pebbly finish. One on the right, with thread, is about half the thickness of the one on the left, which bulks up about double when wet out.

    Thanks!!!!


  21. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    174

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    The right-hand one looks like the xynole I'm use to -- bought from Defender some years ago. Interesting that there's a difference.

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern NY
    Posts
    2,815

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    The one on the right looks like the Xynole that I get from Raka.

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Saint Helena Island, SC
    Posts
    12,598

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Same here. I used RAka Xynole and epoxy on my Rambler 23. Glued carvel construction. Very happy with the result. It does take a LOT of epoxy. A 23' cypress planked hull took Almost 5 gallons to saturate and fair.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  24. #59
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Amelia Va
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Tom Lathrop reccomends xynole for his series of Bluejacket boats. I did follow his suggestions and used Raka xynole.. Took 13 gallons of epoxy to wet out and fill the weave on the hull of my BJ. It has held up fine on our years Great Loop cruise.

    Henry
    De De - Bluejacket 28

  25. #60

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    To you guys who used the product on the right (one with visible white thread) from RAKA, did you verify and are for certain that the product you got from RAKA is the same one Tom has used and tested and is referenced in this thread, or did you simply assume that whatever they delivered was it and you used it as such?

    I have reason to believe it is the one on the left......but I could be wrong. Have been trying to contact Tom to have him verify, but haven't had much luck getting him to respond.

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    5,309

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    The one on the right does look like Xynole that I am familiar with and also got from RAKA. Cannot guarantee that, but it does look the same. It is the one that I used in doing all my testing with. I've not seen any like that on the left side so can't comment on it. Yes, it does soak up lots and lots of epoxy but I consider that a benefit on boats that I use it on. Enhanced waterproofing and abrasion resistance are main advantages. Not good for boats that have serious light weight considerations like kayaks or other portaging boats though.

    I've not received any questions about this that I did not respond to but stuff does happen. I have tried several other materials but don't remember any that looked like the left one. Making sure that you get want you thought you were ordering is not always certain. I bought two new printers last week and have to keep them. Don't ask how that happened. Its embarrassing.
    Last edited by Tom Lathrop; 03-31-2015 at 09:54 AM.
    Tom L

  27. #62

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Thanks Tom. That is the ID verification I was looking for. The product on the left is mostly likely Dynel and the two fabrics samples I have were swapped. BTW, I have been in contact with Southern Industrial Fabrics and their product number for xynole is 6044. They are aware that Defender/Raka call it xynole, but they don't. To them, its just 6044. They don't make this product for any other use other than for Defender and now Raka. The reason for the 3,000 yard minimum is it takes that much to make it worth their while to tool up for a production run. They do this about once every 3 years. It was/is intended to be a generic form of Dynel although xynole is a polyester and dynel a modiacrylic. Chemistry wise, don't know how that makes it a generic form of the same thing, but will leave that to others to figure out. While the two fabrics look similar dry, they look and behave much different when wet out with epoxy. By my estimate, Dynel make take up as much as 1.5X the amount of epoxy as Xynole does.

    But at any rate, I now have my answer and I appreciate the help!!!!

  28. #63
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    289

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    this is odd, I like the tighter weave of the dynel (on the left) - but tests show xynole as better in abrasion etc (makes sense being completely diff. materials)
    I guess what I'm saying is, I'd like to find and test a polyester weave that's closer to the tightness of the dynel

  29. #64
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,510

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    Write to George Dyson and ask about his selection of polyester, and his explanation paper. He has lots of different weights/ weaves.

    George Dyson <gdyson@gmail.com

    George supplies lots of Skin on Frame kayak builders, and was famous for his early development of SOF boats.

    George is a little different to buy from.
    Send in your order by email, receive the material, then send snail mail with the funds.
    Works every time, he responds quickly (unless he is out of town), and the material has always been just what I ordered.
    I have in the past also bought 1 yard samples - he is willing to send the small amount.

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    3,143

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth


  31. #66
    Join Date
    Sep 2022
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    I was wondering if there are any updates on using more generic polyester fabrics compared to “xynole,” or if anyone has seen more testing for abrasion resistance.
    The consensus online leans toward xynole (backed up my Tom’s testing in the cross-referenced thread above), but the Gougeon article also referenced above (whole article here: https://www.epoxyworks.com/index.php...eck-coverings/) gives better results for Dynel, especially over polypropylene.
    I’m not disputing the findings, but I would be interested in other thoughts, opinions or data.


    And does anyone have any experience with this polypropylene? The only thing I could find online was gardening material: https://sandbaggy.com/products/non-w...39586620113001


    Interesting that it was only tested as the secondary layer with Dynel. Could using it as the outer layer reduce print through, and maybe not need an additional layer of epoxy to fill the weave? What about the adhesion and peel strength? Would it risk the whole thing ripping off the boat?

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    22,234

    Default Re: Xynole polyester cloth

    I've used em both, don't know which is which anymore, the tight weave one and the loose weave one.
    I don't think Defender knows either
    I call them both dynel cuz i dunno how to pronounce xynole
    fwiw, here is a piece ofepoxied "dynel" ,cut from a window opening of a sheathed cabin side...

    try doin that with fg ! it very flexi

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •