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Thread: Prettiest boat under thirty feet

  1. #36
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    I think the Duck Trap wherries are the prettiest things afloat....

    ;0 )
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  2. #37
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    I definantly concur with Don Z!

    ANDREW!!! Any more pics of your restoration??? man she needs some serious lovin!!
    .................................................. ...................
    Nil illegitimi carborundum = Never let the bastards wear you down

  3. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    I think the Duck Trap wherries are the prettiest things afloat....

    ;0 )
    Ain't that the sweetest little thing? Gotta go clean up the drool now.

    - Norm

  4. #39
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    At least until mine gets in the water
    Brian T. Cunningham
    SWIFTWOOD - my schooner rigged trimaran sailing kayak
    http://members.aol.com/swiftwood/

  5. #40
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    Awkward steering on those tris and cats.

  6. #41
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    The cat is traditional paddle steering, long before rudders where invented.

    The 1st tri has the same steering as a monohull.
    Brian T. Cunningham
    SWIFTWOOD - my schooner rigged trimaran sailing kayak
    http://members.aol.com/swiftwood/

  7. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian.cunningham View Post
    The 1st tri has the same steering as a monohull.
    B*t doesn't the sheet block and traveller get in the way when tacking and even steering? It looks awkward, that's all. I'd think a wide port below the traveller and longer tiller wo*ld help.

  8. #43
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    Not really, that's what I thought at 1st. a friend has one, you just ease the tiller extention over as you switch sides during a tack.

    And since you brought up pretty boats with unorthodox steering, then let's talk about Coquina


    Brian T. Cunningham
    SWIFTWOOD - my schooner rigged trimaran sailing kayak
    http://members.aol.com/swiftwood/

  9. #44
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    Eagan, Minnesota, USA
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    What was the question, prettiest girl under 5'5"?

    Constance or Sally, Albert Strange Wendas.

  10. #45
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    I've always liked any of Paul Gartside's cutters. Here's Surprise I at 22'

    Todd

    I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.
    Vincent Van Gogh

  11. #46
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    Paul, what is that work boat?

  12. #47
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    Its the Crotch Island Pinky, Grace B, built to lines for the extreme pinky in Chapelle's American Small Sailing Craft.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  13. #48
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    I'd have to vote for William Garden's Eel

    Will

  14. #49
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    That's easy!


  15. #50
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    How about Iren's Romilly:


  16. #51
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    I'll add another vote for Wenda, but those racing canoes are mighty nice.
    Such as this one: (No, it's not mine) A properly finished H28 is hard to beat, too.

  17. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by willmarsh3 View Post
    I'd have to vote for William Garden's Eel

    Yes, I have the plans, but why is the main yard so long? Surely it doesn't need to be - it can't make jib 'n mizzening easy. Am I missing something?

  18. #53
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    I'll give my vote to Romilly.

  19. #54
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    But then my desktop is a picture of her larger sister Roxane.

  20. #55
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    Here's a pair of candidate's:


    The Beaton built Joel White Flatfish Charlotte. Photo by Kent Mountford.

    or


    L. Francis Herreshoff's Quiet Tune.
    Last edited by Russ Manheimer; 04-09-2007 at 07:49 PM.
    Hove to off Swan Point......

  21. #56
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    While I am itching to post pictures of my 28' Common Sense Sloop
    "Red Witch", I can't do to a planned article for WB. However, I you would like to sneek a peek, you can do so by going to Yahoo groups and logging onto "Common Sense Boats". Check out "Jay's Boats" in the photos section.
    Jay

  22. #57
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    Default gunter rig

    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Wynne View Post
    Yes, I have the plans, but why is the main yard so long? Surely it doesn't need to be - it can't make jib 'n mizzening easy. Am I missing something?
    The long spar is the vertically oriented 'gaff' component of the sliding gunter rig. When the mainsail is raised, the spar is vertical and like a mast extention. When you reef, the spar is lowered also, so you lower the weight, reduce sail area, and lower the center of effort all in one. The beauty of this kind of rig.

    Here is how it looks raised, on an Eel named 'Otter':

    http://www.YachtFlyers.com/otter

    And, yes, she was/is an old flame, and I agree she might be the fairest in all the land.

  23. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Wynne View Post
    Yes, I have the plans, but why is the main yard so long? Surely it doesn't need to be - it can't make jib 'n mizzening easy. Am I missing something?
    The bowsprit and boomkin are presumably to help the sail plan. My Elver has a similar setup for boomkin and bowsprit except for the roller furling. On the Elver I just let the jib lay flat on deck or stuff it in the hatch. That is not really elegent but it will have to do until I figure out something better. For the boomkin I just reach back as far as I dare. I have a sheet that goes through a block. If the sheet comes out of the block I am able to undo the boomkin, pull it in, rethread the block, and put it back out.

    This picture came from a thread on the WBF which I can't seem to find now.
    But I have another picture here that I took in Madisonville in October, 2000:


    I have the plans and I'm tempted to start building this boat.

    Here's the Elver I built. But that would be a very biased vote.

    Last edited by willmarsh3; 04-09-2007 at 09:06 PM.
    Will

  24. #59
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    Default Proud Mary, 24'4" Raven

    I'll nominate my 24'4" Raven, built 1958, pretty and fast and also pretty fast!


    A great day sailer, 12'00" cockpit, gets a little spicey about 20 knots of breeze and 320 S.F. of sail and no keel.


    Prettiest girl at the dance!!
    " Be all that you can be"

  25. #60
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    Is that a decked Bolger Gypsy behind the sailing canoe?

  26. #61
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    Ravens are powerf*l boats... and fast!

  27. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by KAIROS View Post
    The long spar is the vertically oriented 'gaff' component of the sliding gunter rig. When the mainsail is raised, the spar is vertical and like a mast extention. When you reef, the spar is lowered also, so you lower the weight, reduce sail area, and lower the center of effort all in one. The beauty of this kind of rig.

    Here is how it looks raised, on an Eel named 'Otter':

    http://www.YachtFlyers.com/otter

    And, yes, she was/is an old flame, and I agree she might be the fairest in all the land.
    Yes, but why so long that it overlaps the mizzen when stowed? It could be 2-3 ft shorter and be hoisted 2-3 ft higher, and it would still work, like any other gunter rigged main.

  28. #63
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    Default short mast

    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Wynne View Post
    Yes, but why so long that it overlaps the mizzen when stowed? It could be 2-3 ft shorter and be hoisted 2-3 ft higher, and it would still work, like any other gunter rigged main.
    Garden may have had other reasons for designing Eel's rig that way, but three reasons come to mind: First, when the sail is furled the mast height is very low and when sailing the longer spar really extends the mast. Second, the longer spar allows a more robust attachment to the mast since the points of attachment are far apart (halyard and jaws). Third, the mast is larger diameter and heavier. Keeping it short and keeping the other thinner spar longer helps divide the weights up so stepping the mast is easier.

    In the down position I never felt the length caused a problem. You could lower on either side of the mizzen. There was some baggywrinkle on the mizzen shrouds where I lashed the spar.

  29. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrewdarius View Post
    The Dark Harbor 17-1/2 holds a special place with me as well.


    The one at the M.O.Y. in RI.



    The one the Apprentice Shop restored.


    My bias comes from being in the middle of a restoration...


    Hows the boat coming Andrew....you lucky dog you
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  30. #65
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    Osborne Russell, yes that is a decked Bolger Gypsy, owned by Mike Wick. Let me know if you want more info or photos of her.

    Hey Tim, the restoration is proceeding slowely, but steadily. I'm currently working on a new transom and transom frame, a bow roof shed is going up, every other frame is being torn out, butt blocks are being removed and I'm resawing a good amount of wood to laminate a new keel. The interior is just about cleaned out enough to begin bending in new frames...

    Though I voted for the DH 17, I certainly concur with many other votes. I've always liked Sjogin. That's a great shot of her Russ.

  31. #66
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    Thanks, Andrew. This is a great thread; maybe we'll tackle boats 30 to 50 feet next. Or powerboats only.

    Do you ever get down to the shore? Stop by Beaton's and I'll take you for a sail.

    Is your boat a Fishers Island 31? Looks familiar.

    Russ
    Hove to off Swan Point......

  32. #67
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    Russ, that's fantastic of you to offer. The most recent and/or closest I've been was when the local TSCA sailed Bull and Bear September last year. Beaton's was mentioned as a place to go, but none of us went over. Maybe this coming Summer I can get out that way again...

    And if my boat were a Fishers Island 31 I'd be just as happy, but she is a DH 17.

  33. #68
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    Allan.. the Bluenose is pretty. I was surprised at the numkbers being worked on or built in NS. Everyone was working on at least one...
    Some, a restoration.. at least one.. brand new.

  34. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by KAIROS View Post
    Garden may have had other reasons for designing Eel's rig that way, but three reasons come to mind: First, when the sail is furled the mast height is very low and when sailing the longer spar really extends the mast. Second, the longer spar allows a more robust attachment to the mast since the points of attachment are far apart (halyard and jaws). Third, the mast is larger diameter and heavier. Keeping it short and keeping the other thinner spar longer helps divide the weights up so stepping the mast is easier.

    In the down position I never felt the length caused a problem. You could lower on either side of the mizzen. There was some baggywrinkle on the mizzen shrouds where I lashed the spar.
    Thanks, I won't argue with experience!

  35. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.V. Airlie View Post
    Allan.. the Bluenose is pretty. I was surprised at the numkbers being worked on or built in NS. Everyone was working on at least one...
    Some, a restoration.. at least one.. brand new.
    The 24' Bluenose was my first boat (unfortunately a glass version by McVay). Same designer as the Bluenose and Laura Ellen. It was a fun (really wet) boat, I miss it.
    Allan of the Grove
    "never send a ferret to do a weasel's job.."

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