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Thread: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

  1. #1
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    Default how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    I have 20' version of a Glen-L kingfisher that I finished building a few years ago. Being on and off the trailer has rubbed a lot of the bottom paint(poly poxy) off and I need to repaint but I dont know the best way to lift the boat. Any thoughs will be deeply appreciated.
    Bruce

  2. #2
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    Lift onto what?

    A lot will depend on what you'll be holding her up with -- just planks across the trailer bunks, or a cradle, or jackstands?
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  3. #3
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    That's what I mean. I don't know. I think I want to suspend it so I can pull the trailer out and paint it from the bottom. Just not sure how I can safely suspend it.
    Any thoughts?
    Bruce

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    Default

    See this WBF thread for ideas: http://tinyurl.com/2dfvnx

  5. #5
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    If you're lucky, this will work:

    Drop the trailer tongue to the ground, support the transom.
    Raise the trailer tongue has high as it will go, support the boat under the bow.
    Drop the tongue parallel to the ground.
    There just might be room to get the paint brush in.

    If not, try this:

    Borrow a bunch of bottle and scissor jacks and crank the trailer up off the ground a foot or so.

    Support the hull, best done with boat stands (poppets, jack stands, whatever they call them where you live.)

    Drop the trailer. Now you can get at the bottom. If you want to get the trailer completely out of the way, it's more complicated, but it can be worked out if necessary.

    I've used both methods on boats up to 25 feet. It's a one-man job either way.

  6. #6
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    This is something I've done many times -- mostly on speedboats (CC, Hacker, etc) and Sea Skiffs (CC, Lyman, etc). It goes faster if you have several jacks, but it can be done with just one and a bunch of blocking.

    Paint an area of the keel near the bow where you can get a jack under it. On some trailers you will be able to get right under with the jack. On some others the trailer's stem will be in the way, if so you'll need two jacks (one on each side of the stem) and a short, sturdy beam between them. Then paint two areas of the bottom right at the transom where the hull can safely be supported.

    After the paint has dried, jack up the boat. If you're just painting you may be able to squeeze in and get it done just like that. If you need to scrape and sand though, you'll need to pull the trailer out. This is done by moving the trailer ahead until the front jack (or jacks) meets some obstruction on the trailer. When that happens, put another jack (or blocking) behind the obstruction and remove the first jack. Repeat as necessary!
    A good supply of jacks speeds thing along nicely. My favorites are old-timey bugle type screw jacks, but hydraulic bottle jacks work too. If you need to borrow some jacks, don't forget to ask your friends for their car jacks, some cars and trucks (I.E. Toyota) still come with nice screw jacks.
    moT

  7. #7
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    Default

    One of these comes in very handy for the task:

  8. #8
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    What MoT said: jacks or jack and blocks; pull trailer out incrementally, moving the jack/ blocks as the trailer axles come up to them.

    Be careful.

    Only go under a boat to paint thats blocked or on stands;jacks alone are not safe.

    And...
    ...be careful.

    Kevin



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    An old thread returns. Since it went dormant, another new device has come on the market.



    -Dave

  10. #10
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    I cheated on my CC. I hooked onto the lift ring with a chain from the bucket of my tractor. Lifted it a couple of feet, blocked it, painted it, then removed the blocks & lowered it.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  11. #11
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    An old thread returns. Since it went dormant, another new device has come on the market.
    I'm very happy to have seen that. The new Harbor Woodworks shop is a big improvement in a lot of ways, but one thing I gave up was a stout overhead structure for rigging a lifting sling. The new covered space is larger, but too 'frail' for such acrobatics. And I've got a project coming up soon where lifting will likely be in the cards. You may have just answered the question of 'how'. Thanks!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  12. #12
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    A set of 3 or 4 of these can be very useful. The wider the base the better, within limits. Some people just build them with plumb sides, that is, the top layer is the same dimension as the bottom tier. The tapered ones are lighter and they stack in a little less space. They're nailed together.





    Which ever you choose if your transom has much deadrise at all be sure to fasten a couple of cross braces between the 2 so they don't slide/spread out sideways.

    Position the hull on the trailer so that the transom is extending out the back end far enough to get the cribs under.

    Paint those 2 areas (the corners) and wherever you're going to block it up up fwd. Let the paint dry.

    Lower the tongue, place the aft cribs and cross braces. Raise the tongue and place the fwd crib.

    Lower the tongue to level and paint the remaining bottom, moving the trailer a little here and there as necessary. Raising and lowering the tongue can be helpful.

    Although the trailer will be somewhat in the way if you leave it under the hull it will save your head if the boat should fall, which it certainly should not with this method, but I feel the need to cover my ass.

    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 03-11-2019 at 12:27 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    An old thread returns. Since it went dormant, another new device has come on the market.



    Looks to be a re-purposed scaffold leveling jack. Easy enough to make those.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    I'm very happy to have seen that. The new Harbor Woodworks shop is a big improvement in a lot of ways, but one thing I gave up was a stout overhead structure for rigging a lifting sling. The new covered space is larger, but too 'frail' for such acrobatics. And I've got a project coming up soon where lifting will likely be in the cards. You may have just answered the question of 'how'. Thanks!
    At your service! This is a slick system, but it costs $600 and there are severe limitations as to trailer height off the ground and boat chine above the trailer frame. It occurred to me after looking at it that four or maybe six bottle jacks at about $25 each and some wood blocking (see Gib's post) would do the same thing at much less cost. Plus, the trailer could be removed.
    -Dave

  15. #15
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    If you jack up the bow then support it with a cross beam on 2 of the cribs you can just pull the trailer straight out.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    We did this this weekend. Cheap harbor freight chain falls and block and tackle. But, we are only picking up about 200lbs at most.

    NavigatorPaintSide.jpg
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  17. #17
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    #17.
    I did similar with a chain hoist. I have also rolled a boat onto it's rub rail, supported the weight and did it that way.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    The Glen L Kingfisher is a centre consol boat. Have you got an outboard?
    If Yes then first make the boat lighter. Remove the outboard.
    Then push the boat of the trailer on to some old tyres covered with a clean tarp. Pull the trailer out from under the boat.
    The tarp is to prevent the tyres making black marks on the hull.,
    Allow the hull to sit on the tyres. Tip the hull up on its beam and prop into place to prevent falling.
    Paint that side down to the keel.
    The lift up the other side and prop the hull, paint that side.
    Give the paint time to dry completely - it needs to harden off.
    Then winch the hull back on to the trailer.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    We did this this weekend. Cheap harbor freight chain falls and block and tackle. But, we are only picking up about 200lbs at most.

    NavigatorPaintSide.jpg
    Glen-L lists Kingfisher's hull weight at 800 pounds. This is a great way to lift the boat off the trailer if the overhead structure is up to the task. The engineered trusses used to frame housing today aren't intended to lift boats, hate to have the roof fall in.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  20. #20
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    An old thread returns. Since it went dormant, another new device has come on the market.



    I used these to lift my catboat on her trailer. They worked great. I'm not sure of my total weight but it must be around 1000 pounds.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    I also have a hoist in my garage that I use to transfer my boat to a dolly for more extensive work. The cable hangs from two 2x12 beams that rest on top of the wall framing.

    Garage Hoist.jpg

  22. #22
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    gantry made of wood.jpg

    A couple of homemade wooden gantries with 4 chain blocks.
    Last edited by oldsub86; 03-12-2019 at 07:47 PM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Or, if you are brave?

    boat stand.jpg

  24. #24
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    This may or may not work, depending on the circumstances:

    Level the boat by raising the trailer tongue and block up the tongue. Place two beams wider than the trailer beneath the hull, supported by cribbing, saw horses, or whatever. Let enough air out of the trailer tires to permit the beams to take the load of the boat and pull the trailer from beneath the boat. Paint and let dry. Replace the trailer and pump up the tires. Remove the support beams.

    Alternately, roll the trailer wheels up on mechnic's ramps. Level boat. Install supporting beams as above. Let air out of trailer tires. Roll trailer off the ramps. Reverse as above.





    Store-bought ramps.





    Home made ramps.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    That's a beauty. Is that a Chebacco?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike.Higgins.94301 View Post
    I also have a hoist in my garage that I use to transfer my boat to a dolly for more extensive work. The cable hangs from two 2x12 beams that rest on top of the wall framing.

    Garage Hoist.jpg

  26. #26
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by earling2 View Post
    That's a beauty. Is that a Chebacco?
    Thank you for the compliment. Its a Bolger Bobcat that has been scaled up from 12x6 to 14x7, with a different bow profile and rig. The cabin and deck also are not in the original plan. In the interest of avoiding thread drift, send me a PM if you would like to know more.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Let enough air out of the trailer tires to permit the beams to take the load of the boat and pull the trailer from beneath the boat.
    One time I wanted to get a trailer out from under a boat that I had blocked up pretty solidly. The trailer was on a gravel driveway, so I figured no problem here, I'll just scrape back the gravel to create a pair of shallow trenches and roll the trailer out. Well, it didn't come close to working, because as the wheels drop down, the springs decompress and keep the bunks and rollers tight against the hull. A few inches of digging or a few inches gained from letting the air out of the tires just isn't enough for most boat/trailer combinations. It's even more difficult if it's a sailboat sitting on a trailer with bunks or framing built up to support narrow after sections.
    -Dave

  28. #28
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    That does bring to mind an interesting and easy possibility though. Jack up the trailer (with the boat on it), block the boat up, let the trailer down and do the job. In many if not most cases the trailer would be easier to jack up than the boat. Cool!
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 03-15-2019 at 01:48 AM.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    I was visiting Florida and needed antifouling but there weren't any boatyards near. So, I built a big "A" frame out of scrap wood, kinda like a big sawhorse to suspend the boat off the chainplates. I lowered the trailer tongue jack as low as it would go, put a jack stand off the rudder bearing. Then I raised the tongue as high as I could and tightened the lines from the chainplates, lowered the tongue and rolled the trailer out. Better in pictures, here goes, OK not a wooden hull but it is a Bolger.

    Dovekie on Trailer.jpg

    Dovekie off trailer.jpg

    Wasn't too bad as the boat only weighs 1000 lbs

    I'm currently trying to figure out how to take a 400 pound boat off the trailer and flip it so I can put a racing bottom on it. Anyone ever do this?

  30. #30
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    I'm about to do this next week, Trailer the boat (12 ft ply dinghy) into the workshop, with slings and chain hoists lift the boat, remove the trailer, roll the boat in the slings (I've done this before) lower onto horses or the trailer again as I'm going to spray the hull outside if weather permits.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    That does bring to mind an interesting and easy possibility though. Jack up the trailer (with the boat on it), block the boat up, let the trailer down and do the job. In many if not most cases the trailer would be easier to jack up than the boat. Cool!
    Yep, I've done it that way. Works like a charm.
    -Dave

  32. #32
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge

    That does bring to mind an interesting and easy possibility though. Jack up the trailer (with the boat on it), block the boat up, let the trailer down and do the job. In many if not most cases the trailer would be easier to jack up than the boat. Cool!
    Yep, I've done it that way. Works like a charm.
    I can't see it, but am willing to learn fellas: once the boat is blocked and the trailer is dropped, the trailer is still, "trapped, "under the boat by the blocking, isn't it?

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Well, I haven't done it either, but so long as the trailer can be jockied around a bit it would be pretty easy to paint the bottom with a long handled roller.

    Also, if it were possible to slip a long beam under the forefoot and support it with cribbing at each end or hang the bow in a sling or from the bow eye from the ceiling or a branch one could just pull the trailer out once it was lowered. The beam wouldn't work with all boats though, the forefoot would usually be too low in the trailer for that.
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 03-15-2019 at 12:35 PM.

  34. #34
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    Default Re: how to lift a trailered boat for painting

    Kevin, it is trapped, but you can still pull it out by jockeying the blocking around. The real advantage of jacking up the trailer is that standard jacks fit very well under a trailer frame, not so well under most boat hulls. So the jacks contact the steel frame, and later wood blocking, padded if you like, contacts the hull.
    -Dave

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