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Thread: Swing out garage doors

  1. #1
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    Default Swing out garage doors

    Hey all,

    Looking for some carriage style, swing out garage doors for my new garage/shop. I want swing out, not overhead. They'd need to be stock designs that can fit standard size openings. My budget is 1 boat unit or less. They should look decent but don't need to be period doors or anything of that nature.

    Cheers,
    Clint
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  2. #2
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    Clint,

    Understand not wanting overhead doors. Just remember that when we get snow/ice like we have these past couple of storms that you'll have to keep it cleared away so that the doors can swing open. Would doors that slide open along the outside walls do, or is the building not set up for something like that? See http://www.abettersite.com/a-rockler-barn-hardware.html

  3. #3
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    No room for them to slide open. Someone suggested the roll up doors but they are too "self storage" facility looking. So, it'll be shovel the snow out of the way and swing open.

    Thanks.
    Clint
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  4. #4
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    My shop has a pair of swing-out doors. The good news is that they don't obstruct ceiling light fixtures as an overhead garage door would. The bad news is that if there's snow or ice on the ground outside 'em, i'm gonna spend some time clearing it. A lowered stoop would help here.
    Another section of the shop has a conventional roll-up garage door from Home Depot. Aside from the fact that it obscures the ceiling when open, it's more weather tight and a lot easier to work with.
    Can't remember what it cost, but i recollect that it was quite reasonable. These things are manufactured in volume.
    If I weren't concerned about the outside appearance, i'd prefer the roll-up door.

  5. #5
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    There are overhead door that look like carriage doors , they are spendy though.

    http://www.hahnswoodworking.com/carriagedoors.html

    http://www.hahnswoodworking.com/carriagedoors.html

    Or make your own Hardware could be found or maybe hand forged

  6. #6

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    I rolled my own. 2x5 ladder-style frame, Styrofoam insulation with spray foam to fill the voids, 1/4" plywood skin on the interior and exterior glued and stapled and a "faux" front on it for fun. Windows were custom 1/2" airspace - cost $30 each, muntons are fake, hinges are real.

    http://www.robswoodworking.com/images/doors.jpg
    http://www.robswoodworking.com/images/door_finished.jpg
    http://www.robswoodworking.com//imag...nished_int.jpg

    Rob

  7. #7
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    Maybe a step through, inward opening 'people' door would work for winter entry and exit. I once worked in a shop that had that.

  8. #8
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    I'm curious about something similar, except instead of "swing out", I'd like to do a "bi-fold". If I just swing along a track, I'll run out of room, but if I can accordian it (kind of like a closet door), it should work well. Somewhere I have a photo of the type of door I mean...

    I think I can manage building the door itself, it's the hardware that is proving difficult. I've been all through McMaster-Carr and Grainger's, but haven't really found the right bearing. Any thoughts?
    Heute ist so ein schöne Tag...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Maybe a step through, inward opening 'people' door would work for winter entry and exit. I once worked in a shop that had that.

    That's what I was going to say. Is it going to be a garage in another life? You might want to make something real simple and take into account that you won't be opening it much. Then when you return to your suburban lifestyle, you can have a regular up n over door.

  10. #10
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    Clint I got a snail mail catalog today that has some hardware that could work for your doors , heres a link to thier web site , worth a look:


    http://www.vandykes.com/subcategory/215/

    Sample hinge :



    Home > Restoration Hardware > Gate Hinges & Gate Latches Gate Hinges & Gate Latches printer friendly version Iron Gate Hinge 16 1/2"


    $37.99$34.19for 6 or more Item no: 02008266

    Iron
    Overall Width 16 1/2" x Overall Height 7"
    • Sold Each



    Humm that cool it posted the photo just by C&P normally I have to post the photo seperate .

    Hope it helps , G/L

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Z. View Post
    I'm curious about something similar, except instead of "swing out", I'd like to do a "bi-fold". If I just swing along a track, I'll run out of room, but if I can accordian it (kind of like a closet door), it should work well. Somewhere I have a photo of the type of door I mean...

    I think I can manage building the door itself, it's the hardware that is proving difficult. I've been all through McMaster-Carr and Grainger's, but haven't really found the right bearing. Any thoughts?
    Don, I built a pair of 19' wide insulated bifold doors on the end of a post and beam barn once. The owner didn't want any center post. I used barn door track hardware. It took some fooling with. What I ended up doing was mounting the track at a slight angle. In the center the track was flush with the wall but at the corners the track had to be spaced away from the building a couple of inches. I also used some huge strap hinges for the corner pivot. It all came out so tight that the customer had to crack a window to get the woodstove going.

    Steven

  12. #12
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    How wide will the doors be? Really wide doors have a nasty tendancy to sag, and place a huge cantilevered load on the hinges. One of the best solutions to that dilemma that I have seen is to fit a couple of wheels on the ends of the doors to support them, angled to follow the arc of opening and closure. On one rawther fawncy carriage house, they were iron wheels running on iron tracks set in granite block...

  13. #13
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    Still not sure what to do but am now leaning back in the overhead door option and setting up track lights on the sides so when the door is open lights can shine on the boat on a nice summer night...maybe I can set up a fluorescent light hooked to the inside of the open door to provide light on the forward section of the boat under the door. In the winter, I'll want a tight door. I have a friend who works for Clopay so I may be able to get a decent price from him. Anybody have Clopay's door anecdotes? The bifolds sound cool, Steven, but tedious. Any experiences of excellent shop lighting in regards to best fixture types or ideas on the trick of lighting aound an open garage door? Send em my way. TX.

    Cheers,
    Clint
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  14. #14
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    I had a double Clopay door (uninsulated) in Georgia and it was okay but leaked water underneath. You might want to have a lip on the floor inside to help prevent that.

    I thought the reason you wanted to avoid having an overhead door was so you could brace molds, etc. to overhead rafters/joists the full length of the building.

    Good luck. Monday is start day, huh!

  15. #15
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    In my garage I set up a 4' "shop light" directly over the glass windows when door is rolled up...
    Chris

  16. #16
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    It sounds like what you are seeking is a set of barn doors. Look for barn door hinges and support the latch edge of the doors with a diagonal stay anchored about four feet above the top hinges. I have seen sixteen foot wooden gates supported in this manner and they naver sag.

  17. #17
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    Doors open at night with lights on = bugs here in Michigan. How 'bout Maine?
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  18. #18
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    Rob,

    Nice looking doors. I had a set of doors built for a rental house garage about 15years ago, same technique. They are still great and have not sagged on bit.
    Looks like a nice shop space.
    Jimmy
    __________
    Loving Living on Lake Bacalar.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton B Chase View Post
    Someone suggested the roll up doors but they are too "self storage" facility looking.
    FWIW, you can get them with heavy fabric and flexible windows instead of that corrugated aluminum stuff. Raynor is one mfr.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by katiedobe View Post
    Rob,

    Nice looking doors. I had a set of doors built for a rental house garage about 15years ago, same technique. They are still great and have not sagged on bit.
    Looks like a nice shop space.
    What in the hell are you talking about Katie?? I don't see any photo's ssor's post??

    He should make some nice doors , swing out doors are way nicer looking , don't take up wall space , in fact I have shelfs on my swing out doors , and don't take up ceiling space / kill lighting etc . If it's a shop a 3'0" man door will get you in and out , and when you need to open the big doors you just do it.

    Now for a garage where the little women parks her car a overhead door with elec. door opener makes more sense. But what sudo boat builder / woodworker parks a car in a garage anyway

  21. #21
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    How about a horizontal bifold hanger type door?

    http://www.bifold.com/photo_designer.php

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by katiedobe View Post
    Rob,

    Nice looking doors. I had a set of doors built for a rental house garage about 15years ago, same technique. They are still great and have not sagged on bit.
    Looks like a nice shop space.
    "WAS" a nice shop space. It was at our place in Bonney Lake WA, but we've since sold and moved. I sure do miss that shop though.

    Rob

  23. #23
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    My shop in Pittsburgh had swing out doors. I made my own to replace the ancient, sagging things that were there when we bought the property.

    FWIW, i would much rather have swing out doors than OH. The OH blocks too much light, and uses valuable overhead space IMHO.
    Bill R

    There was supposed to be an earth shattering KABOOM!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcdenny View Post
    Doors open at night with lights on = bugs here in Michigan. How 'bout Maine?
    RATHER. At my parents' home in Maine we made a screen of mosquito netting that can be hung across the whole opening to allow for leaving the garage/workshop door open. Even during the day the bugs can get pretty nasty in early summer...

  25. #25
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    First of all Paul,

    Katiedobe is the white doberman sitting in my lap. I use her name on line and as my email address.
    My name is Jimmy, just like I sign all my posts. Nice to meet you.

    Now the pictures of Rob's very nicely done doors load quickly if you click on the links, three of them, that he included in his first post on this thread.

    Thirdly, I like the look of the outward opening Bi-folds. As seen on this link. http://www.bifold.com/index.php Kinda cool.

    Makes me want to make some for a set of windows that look out on the lake just for the challenge of it.
    Peace.


    Jimmy
    __________
    Loving Living on Lake Bacalar.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    Don, I built a pair of 19' wide insulated bifold doors on the end of a post and beam barn once. The owner didn't want any center post. I used barn door track hardware. It took some fooling with. What I ended up doing was mounting the track at a slight angle. In the center the track was flush with the wall but at the corners the track had to be spaced away from the building a couple of inches. I also used some huge strap hinges for the corner pivot. It all came out so tight that the customer had to crack a window to get the woodstove going.

    Steven
    Not sure I follow.

    While I understand the track door part, but I can't quite picture what you are saying. In my mind, I see a wheel on the track, with an axle of some sort hanging vertically down. That axle would attach to the door itself, but how? It needs to support the weight of the door, but at the same time the door needs to rotate around the axle, and that's where I'm stumped.

    I like the idea of the vertically folding doors. I priced them, and they want a god-awful amount of money for them. I wonder if I could make those, myself? The manufactured ones are a wood veneer on a metal frame. I was thinking of going solid wood (cedar), because I don't know anything about welding... but I guess I could learn to weld... much prefer working in wood though.
    Heute ist so ein schöne Tag...

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by katiedobe View Post
    First of all Paul,

    Katiedobe is the white doberman sitting in my lap. I use her name on line and as my email address.
    My name is Jimmy, just like I sign all my posts. Nice to meet you.

    Now the pictures of Rob's very nicely done doors load quickly if you click on the links, three of them, that he included in his first post on this thread.

    Thirdly, I like the look of the outward opening Bi-folds. As seen on this link. http://www.bifold.com/index.php Kinda cool.

    Makes me want to make some for a set of windows that look out on the lake just for the challenge of it.
    Peace.



    Eh sorry about that eh Jimmy Hard enought to figger out who to call what around this place all these made up names , folks using three or four etc Sure you sign um all but when I guys scrollin back and forth well eh it happens . I did later see the three links to Rob's shop garage etc , but didn't post back that I'm a idoit .

    So Peace back at ya , what's the dogs name Katie ?? Or do ya throw the dobe into that as well??? She MTL one confused puppy if in ya do.

    So again Peace out bro like Chad used to say

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Z. View Post
    Not sure I follow.

    While I understand the track door part, but I can't quite picture what you are saying. In my mind, I see a wheel on the track, with an axle of some sort hanging vertically down. That axle would attach to the door itself, but how? It needs to support the weight of the door, but at the same time the door needs to rotate around the axle, and that's where I'm stumped.

    I like the idea of the vertically folding doors. I priced them, and they want a god-awful amount of money for them. I wonder if I could make those, myself? The manufactured ones are a wood veneer on a metal frame. I was thinking of going solid wood (cedar), because I don't know anything about welding... but I guess I could learn to weld... much prefer working in wood though.
    The wheel at the end of the door would be attached thru a bracket that holds it but it would pivot on the door the wheels them self would follow the track . Thats how standard barn door hardware would work in that set up.

    I think why Steve had to pad the tracks out at the winge point is due the hinge pivoting that edge of the door outward as the door swung open the wheels would bind if the track didn't move out as the wheel although able to rotate would need to stay in line with that pivoting hinged door point.

    There more than likely some wierd hinge setup made that would allow that hinge point to not rotate outward , it would have to be a double hinged point hinge or a strange bent type hinge .

    Euro cabinet hinges have that type capablity but would not have the weight carrying capabilties to handle a big heavy door .

    Very inventive Steve

  29. #29
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    Paul has it. Somewhere I have pictures but that was before the digital age. The doors were really heavy: roughsawn 2x4 hemlock frame with 2" of foam insulation inset with t&g pine on the inside and roughsawn 1x12 board and batten on the outside. Each panel was 4 1/2 by 8 feet - it took two people to lift them.

    Steven

  30. #30
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    The "bracket at the end of the door" is the part I'm trying to figure out how to make. It needs tb be heavy enough to support the door (and I'm thinking a door about 3 feet wide by 12 tall) while also being able to rotate.

    What I did see (and I'm looking for the photos) at the garage at the Winchester House in San Jose was what looked to be a simple solution (If I'm understanding the "swing out" correctly) to the hinge problem. The first panel of the doors was only half as wide as the others, so the "hinge point" was centered on the door panels. One "hook on the rail" supported each door.
    Heute ist so ein schöne Tag...

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Z. View Post
    The "bracket at the end of the door" is the part I'm trying to figure out how to make. It needs tb be heavy enough to support the door (and I'm thinking a door about 3 feet wide by 12 tall) while also being able to rotate.

    What I did see (and I'm looking for the photos) at the garage at the Winchester House in San Jose was what looked to be a simple solution (If I'm understanding the "swing out" correctly) to the hinge problem. The first panel of the doors was only half as wide as the others, so the "hinge point" was centered on the door panels. One "hook on the rail" supported each door.



    Here ya go Don , there may be a shoulder on the top of that bolt that would need to be rounded over so the bolt could rotate while the wheels followed the track . I don;t think there is I think it will just rotate as normal operation.

    Hinge the jamb edge with the hinge knuckle to the exterior of the building and the center / pivot point of the bifold the knuckle would be inside the building.

  32. #32
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    Here's the link to more options Don,

    http://hardware.hardwarestore.com/73...-hardware.aspx

  33. #33
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    Thanks! That might work, if I can get it to rotate. If not, perhaps I can find a way to make this one do it...

    Heute ist so ein schöne Tag...

  34. #34
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    Amazing how a simple question about swing out garage doors yields all these thoughts, including a picture of a guy with a white doberman

    We'll build some nice 8' tall cedar doors for the shop...
    having trouble getting pics up

    Cheers,
    Clint
    Last edited by Clinton B Chase; 04-11-2007 at 10:07 PM.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  35. #35
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    The hinges are the bitch here, I built a set of doors for my last shop.
    The hinges were big bucks and I wasn't worried about looks. ended up using surplus pillow block bearings with half inch shafting for hinges.
    Total cost under a hundred bucks. For two heavy doors on a 14' opening it is the cats ass. I drove by the place last year and after 15 years in the air they are still going strong.
    There was some metal fab involved, the shafts were pinned through a bracket I welded onto 4" channel which bolted to the frame and the four pillow blocks were bolted to the door. It would swing all the way out to flat against the building that way and the doors didn't need rollers like I see on lots of swing doors. Was a bit tricky lifting them and dropping them onto the pins. Took a bit of time and some serious cussing.

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