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Thread: Speaking of Living Aboard...

  1. #141
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
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    1,919

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    Life intervened.....the builder went on to other projects, the design has languished with no new champion appearing. Inquires about new-build liveaboard boats have completely dried up. There are currently a lot more existing boats available than owners interesting in using them.
    Cool thread, I remember the motor launch build.

    I don't know about your side of the border, but down here liveaboard moorage costs nearly as much as an apartment on shore, and you still have to provide the boat. Over $1000/month for a 40 foot livaboard is normal. Finding a marina that will have you anywhere near the metro areas is also becoming nearly impossible.

    Anchoring out has become difficult and highly monitored by the authorities. The rich people who line every snug anchorage call and complain as soon as they realise you aren't just passing through. It's almost enough to make a guy sail off for Mexico, I hope things are better at the other end of the Salish Sea.

  2. #142
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Flattop Islands
    Posts
    2,240

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Living aboard has never been easy, it's hard but not impossible. In BC it's become difficult or impossible to anchor in big city harbours, so the majority of "anchor outs" have migrated north. Of course the smaller northern communities are somewhat unhappy about this. In our own bay the liveaboard community has shrunk considerably over the past 10 years. It's a bit worrisome now to be the only people on the water when a big storm blows through. There are a few brighter spots though, some marinas have established liveaboard docks, of course space is limited, but not impossible to find (even in big cities) if you have some flexibility as to location.
    ___________________________________
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  3. #143
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    727

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    We wanted to live on waterfront property...but couldn't afford one in the area where our jobs are. Eventually we did find one ….60 miles from my work. Takes me 1hour 10 min to get to work - with regular traffic.
    I would be interested to hear from waterfront property owners about their experience with boats anchoring in front of their houses.
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
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    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  4. #144
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    23,563

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Quote Originally Posted by 2dogsnight View Post
    I would be interested to hear from waterfront property owners about their experience with boats anchoring in front of their houses.
    Waterfront restrictions are becoming tighter by the year in the US. Living aboard and anchoring out has been limited to short stays of at most a month in some eastern states. I don't know about elsewhere. Even dock building and what you can attach to a dock (diving boards, a slide, inflatable swim platforms, kayak docks) are getting scrutiny in the permitting process. When I was young a few local boys built a very small houseboat and set it out on a mooring, sort of like a floating clubhouse. I'd dearly like to build one with/for my grandchildren but doubt it would be allowed to moor out, even on our own shorefront on one of our own moorings.
    Last edited by rbgarr; 12-04-2018 at 01:22 PM.
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

  5. #145
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    16,277

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Originally Posted by 2dogsnight

    I would be interested to hear from waterfront property owners about their experience with boats anchoring in front of their houses.



    I second what rbgarr says. Around here, the local town ordinance does not target liveaboards exclusively but any boat anchoring out. Basically, you can not anchor in the same place for more than a 72 hours at a time. Of course, folks spending a week aboard on vacation, or laying over as they cruise through are not generally asked to move, but the law does allow the bay constable ( our harbor master) to remove any boat that's a houseboat/ liveaboard.

    Really, it's the town's way of saying: you can't live here without paying taxes.

    Compounding that, there are laws about " riparian" rights and including right to certain views. In the same way that it is not permissable for a waterfront property owner to erect a structure at the water's edge ( boat lifts are not legal here) which might block the view of other waterfront homeowners next to her, one can be cited for violating those rights with one's anchored boat.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  6. #146
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    On the river, Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,748

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    Living aboard has never been easy, it's hard but not impossible. In BC it's become difficult or impossible to anchor in big city harbours, so the majority of "anchor outs" have migrated north. Of course the smaller northern communities are somewhat unhappy about this. In our own bay the liveaboard community has shrunk considerably over the past 10 years. It's a bit worrisome now to be the only people on the water when a big storm blows through. There are a few brighter spots though, some marinas have established liveaboard docks, of course space is limited, but not impossible to find (even in big cities) if you have some flexibility as to location.
    I'm very fortunate, have a long term lease on a private dock way up an estuary with about 200m of rainforest between me and the nearest road. With the deal came a 44ft x 14 ft boatshed, and permission to put a floor through it to make it a workshop. I'm not sure about the legality of living aboard full time, so, with the agreement of my ex her address is my official home. Its an ideal place, sheltered, quiet, private and on the water with birdsong all day.

    But I'd estimate that there are perhaps 1200 people living on board in the Auckland area, many on marinas which generally maintain one finger as liveaboard berths, they've found that having people there full time actually benefits the place in terms of action when things go wrong and in reduction of petty theft and vandalism.
    Quite a few live on swing or pile moorings as well, and the yacht clubs that administer those also like having them there for the same reason.

    I've been here for four years as of this month, don't foresee moving any time soon, the land owner says she doesn't plan to develop or sell the property so I'm reasonably secure. Fingers crossed.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  7. #147
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    23,563

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    I'd estimate that there are perhaps 1200 people living on board in the Auckland area, many on marinas which generally maintain one finger as liveaboard berths, they've found that having people there full time actually benefits the place in terms of action when things go wrong and in reduction of petty theft and vandalism.

    Do you happen to know how sewage is handled in these Auckland marinas?
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

  8. #148
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    202

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    We lived aboard our last boat year round in Ottawa, Canada, right down town at the marina. It was the first time they hadn't been broken into over the winter months, so it worked out well for both sides.
    Have a boat that folks are interested in and it opens doors.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  9. #149
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    On the river, Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,748

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Do you happen to know how sewage is handled in these Auckland marinas?
    Most of them have a pump out station at their fuel dock, but liveaboards generally use a bucket with a sealed lid, carry the "night soil" out when they go to the showers or laundry.
    I think, but am not sure, that one might have sewer connections on one or two of their piers. Mainly for visiting large yachts.

    Some, like me, have big holding tanks, I take mine out to sea every month or so and discharge well out. The rules say "water depth no less than 5 metres and no less than 500m from shore or from a marine farm, but I prefer to go out further than that.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  10. #150
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    15,396

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    “Marine farm”. .... ugh .

  11. #151
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    45,882

    Default Re: Speaking of Living Aboard...

    MarkO makes a point that runs counter to much marina and harbor prejudice. There are some derelicts - hulls and humans - in the live-aboard world, just as there are ashore. But mostly a live-aboard or two bring order and safety to a marina or a mooring field. Summer pilfering of yachts in Hyannis Port when I was in Lewis Bay simply moved to Lewis Bay when I moved to Hyannis Port and terrorized the little thieves with search light and signal cannon. The Dockside/Lewis Bay Marina was a common Barnstable PD stop in the winter until I moved in. Same happened at two docks in the North End of Boston and a dock in Chelsea.

    Besides the deterrence to petty property crime that a live-aboard brings, there's general spiffing, basically the dock master's free maintenance crew. Boat people like an orderly life and thus will pick up trash, change lights, sort power, mooring, and hose lines, notice if a boat looks a bit down on her lines . . . basic stuff where knowing eyes leads to the many small acts that keep trouble at bay.

    Finally, there's lifesaving. Especially out in a mooring field, it's remarkable how much trouble people get into. I've pulled out and treated for severe hypothermia three different drunken jerks, victims of Figawee excess. And when I was in Hyannis Port the number of fools ignorant of tides whom I rescued from the Hyannis Port breakwater was pretty much a couple or small party per month.

    If I ran a dock or a harbor, I would go out of my way to make it live-aboard friendly as a way to reduce management problems and promote general health and safety.

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