Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: A day racing big boats.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default A day racing big boats.

    Today was a big boat day ... it was interesting. Today was the first day of the Elliot Spring Cup. Today was five races back to back.

    Yacht racing is goodish. It can be closeish. The boats are fastish. The Skippers play to win. The crews are called rail meat.

    There is a bit of string to worry about on big boats. People get hurt. One of the crew on a boat called 'Need For Speed' broke her arm. It was very cold today. I grabbed a few photos, when I could. The umpire on the water was John Whitfield. He has umpired America's Cup, the Louis Vuitton and match races all around the globe. He was very particular. He drove his boat very close to the boats racing. He has a loud voice, "One of your sailors Skipper, had moved outside the vertical and was hanging onto a shroud, this is your first warning Skipper!" Today was cool. In fact on the water today, it was freezing.

    After the racing, I had a few drinks and we told stories about the others crews. Matt Owen is leading at the end of today on 'Walter Turnbull and Associates' from Gus Reid on Humungus. The Elliot Spring Cup is on again tomorrow. There is one more race to go tomorrow ... but I'll be dinghy racing. All is well with the world. I'm very tired.

    I hope you like these shots from today.
















    Do you know the nationality of the guy hanging onto the brace above? ... he is a Pole.

    Big boats have their moments. Big boats can be fun but dinghy racing is more immediate and closer to the water ... I like getting wet.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-21-2006 at 11:17 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    24,890

    Default

    Do you like getting wet as much as these guys in 470s off Croatia?

    http://tinyurl.com/yydt5f (youtube)

    (Yes... I bet you do!)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default

    Great footage from Croatia rbgarr. a tad low on technique for picking the gusts but big on enthusiasm for not really caring to.

    We are all 96% water and staying wet is the meaning of life. When I was a kid I had a book called The Water-Babies, it was a children's book (then, but now it is an ethic) The ethic is hard wired in to my psychy, and was by the time I was five. I thought Water-Babies was the bible then and still kind of do now. The book is by Charles Kingsley and the drawings were done by Jessie Willcox Smith in 1916. They are charming and all kids should own a copy and that's why I'm not big on religion rbgarr ... the zealots are looking at the wrong book.

    The adult version of the same book is called 'High Performance Sailing' by Frank Bethwaite. All concerned parents should make this book also mandatory beadtime reading for their young ones and then keep reading it themselves when they go to bed ... this book is thicker than the bible.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-21-2006 at 11:10 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    Looks like fun! The older I get, the more I enjoy racing (perhaps because my skills still improve).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default A wooden Elliot 7.

    Henning the saying goes? "It's what you learn after you think that you know it all, that really matters." Hopefully I have a lot to learn still. I look at the older sailors at the Canberra Yacht Club, some are into their 60's and 70's. They are so hard to beat. I'm not necessarily looking forward to being 60-70 mind you ... but if I can sail as good as some of the older guys, I will have a lot to look forward to.

    It would be a bit amiss not to put a wooden boat on the forum amongst all of these swish composite boats. 'Need For Speed' (red hull) is end grain Balsa sheatherd in glass. The bow crew, Sarah was the person who broke her arm yesterday. 'Need For Speed' is the only wooden Elliot 7 in the regatta.

    I should do a photo expose' about 'Need for Speed'. All of the epoxy has aged and shrunk and the blocks of end grain Balsa can be seen when the right angle of light catches her surface. She looks like she is made of red and white blocks of Leggo. She is certainly different from your average wooden boat. I haven't looked inside 'Need For Speed' yet. If she is like the other end grain Balsa boats here (like some Sharpies), with their interiors painted in clear, she will look amazing.





    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-22-2006 at 04:34 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Brunswick, GA
    Posts
    657

    Default

    I love that "Rail Rats".
    Old Sailor

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default

    Me too Bob, It is a shame the images are small here, they have a lot of presence when they are larger and show more clarity.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-22-2006 at 04:36 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default

    After today's racing and a few words of persuasion recently from Matt Owen the current Australian Elliot 7 Champion, like, "Wassa get out of those flaming slowboats. Flying Fifteens are nothing but bathtubs, get on a real boat Mate come and race an Elliot 7." His silken tongue sold me. I'll tell him that I'll change over tomorrow to big boats ... heaven forbid. I'll ring my current Skipper first thing tomorrow morning and not drag out the agony.

    I'm going to change to racing sports boats until a trimaran coming from Melbourne is finished and race with her owner Warren Reynolds, his boat is a monster. I've been in dinghies for a long time and will still race performance dinghies mid week ... probably in my own boat, I miss Skippering but love crewing.

    It is time for a change. I like the power of big spinnakers. It was the big spinnakers that won me over, they look a lot more dangerous. That I find appealing. Over the last few weeks I've seen Elliots come unstuck in big ways, in big winds under spinnakers, that probably was, what won me over.





    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-22-2006 at 06:18 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Virgin Islands
    Posts
    1,521

    Default

    Well you had more fun than me. Spent the day pressure washing barnacles off boat bits.

    Looks like great fun, good luck with your dinghy race.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default

    Rick did you enjoy doing it? Doing things like pressure washing hulls, repairing gel coats, stripping paint, painting, acid bathing the rusty bits before fairing keels, replacing rusty bolts and cutting and polishing boats skins, is full time for me. When ever an owner works along side me, they don't last long before they can't lift their arms above their heads, if we're working under their boat when on a hoist. I say to the owners, "Just slow down, at that pace you wont last 20 minutes," "I'm right!" they usually say. We have at least a week's work and they might last one hour. They don't last long before they shoot through and leave the job to me. I once worked with an owner that stuck out the distance for a few days, he is the only one. I do six days a week every week ... it sure toughens one up.

    I only just realized that I have this photo of the wounded sailor, that I mentioned above. The broken arm was found to be a dislocated elbow, thankfully. The quality of the grab shot isn't good ... but I wasn't set up to take a photo when it happened and we were moving quickly.





    An impression of pain.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-24-2006 at 12:55 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default

    It was my first day racing with my new Skipper today. He was happy with today's result. He gave me the small trophy.

    I worked all of last week on the new boat bringing her up to a tidy race level. I redid the surface of the drop keel to a clean shape, refaired the skeg and recut the hull's race finish and then put a slippery hull polish on her, that took 5 days work ... the Skipper thinks his money was well spent. It was well spent ... and I'll spend more of it tomorrow.

    My old Skipper (who I had many a good race with) finished in the pack today within his division but still raced well, but my new Skipper finished at the pointy end.

    My old Skipper had started to race far too tightly and this change of strategy (over last year's strategy) was the main reason why I left him. His new tight style was not compatible to the way I like to race. Where as the new Skipper races very freely looking for good wind. I think that I'll enjoy racing with the new guy. We are only going to race two up on his boat ... the boats that had more crew on them today, within our division, didn't race so well in the light conditions.

    With two legs to go we had boats right up our hammer, they all went for pressure close to the shore, in the light conditions, we used the slight advantage of the current in the middle of the course and found some clear air ... not wind, just clear air, which allowed us to gain on some of the boats. During the last leg, the Skipper covered the main threats well, he positioned the boat beautifully. When the pack did their last tacks, we were higher than the other boats, so when we tacked, it was like rolling down a hill.

    I think I will like being crew on the new boat.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 10-30-2006 at 10:24 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Australian Capital Territory,
    Posts
    5,510

    Default

    The wind was 12-18 knots during yesterday's race. It wasn't a day for boat on boat tactics, just a follow the leader day. Apart from finding a good position on the course, that was the only real skill needed. No boat passed another during the race, that I noticed, except us. It was just a day for trying to keep the boat as close to flat as possible in the wind.

    The boat had a new jib, which we were trying out and I couldn't get it flat at any stage during the race. It wasn't through lack of trying changes and tensions. The jib sheets were set through the jib fairleads and in the sustained wind they were limited in their monement aft when adjustments were needed. The sail closed the slot and didn't allow the wind to exhaust at all well. Next time I will know how to set this new sail up in the same conditions. I should have set the sheets up to run through the genoa fairleads in th esturdy wind. The genoa tracks sit slightly outboard of the jib tracks and they also run in longer tracks further aft than the jib fairleads. We didn't have enough mast rake set yesterday either for most of the race. It was set well, until the wind got up.

    My new Skipper Martin is smiling.





    ... because winners are grinners. We had good luck yesterday. We were runing second until the last leg, when the lead boat headed to the wrong mark. Things like this don't happen often in this company. The guy who got lost yesterday had made the comment earlier to me, "So you have joined our fleet have you, you won't get a look in, just follow us to know what to do."

    This is why I think yesterday's win was a good timely one. I'm glad when the leading boat went in the wrong direction and we didn't follow.

    I said to my Skipper, "They are going to the wrong mark Skipper, we could win this race because in the sailing instructions it says, "On an A course" (a triangle with a sausages) "when the finish is a tower finish and not an on the water finish, if the final mark is east of the tower, after the second mark is rounded on the final lap, the third mark is missed and boats are to proceed to the finish line from the second mark.""

    My skipper read the special rules of the race in the notice of race, and then headed straight home after rounding the second mark. It pays for all crews to be on the ball ... because as crew we are the co-pilots.

    The highlight of the day was when a Thompson yacht hit one of the dinghy marks (they are green and small and not as visible as the large yellow yacht marks ) and dragged the dinghy mark over 100 metres from it's position before they realized that they had it. Then the Skipper haulled the mark and the mooring on board and then sailed back to reposition the mark close to where he though he had captured it ... to the cheers from the dinghy sailors. The Skipper was awarded a bottle of wine during the race presentations, for his service to dinghy racing. Brilliant.

    I wonder what rules apply in that situation? If the dinghy guys had noticed and chased the moving mark and did a correct rounding they could have saved hundreds of metres over those who had already rounded the mark when in it's correct position. It's a hard one for 'outside interference' ... but funny never the less.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 11-12-2006 at 10:35 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. 15' to 18' sailing designs
    By Erik le Rouge in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: 02-01-2008, 07:10 PM
  2. Race Courses
    By Tom Hunter in forum Misc. Boat Related
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-07-2006, 05:20 PM
  3. WHOA! Float boat in Montana
    By NormMessinger in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 02-09-2004, 10:47 PM
  4. Glued Lapstrake for larger boats?
    By Peter Jacobs in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 69
    Last Post: 01-21-2004, 09:06 PM
  5. Repost "Double planked runabout" (NIA)
    By Ross M in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-26-2002, 02:16 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •