Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Sharpening Plane Blade on Granite Block

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    104

    Default Sharpening Plane Blade on Granite Block

    I've tried sharpening a plane blade with sandpaper affixed to a piece of glass--it works well, but I use spray adhesive--which is hard to remove.

    I bought a tile of granite and have read that it can be applied to the glass be soaking the paper in water--I've tried that, but the paper slips.

    Anyone have experience with sharpening by using sandpaper on a granite piece, and how best to help it stick to the stone without using glue?
    Vince

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    51

    Default

    I have done that on a piece of that synthetic granite stuff. I just use a few drops of water and the paper stuck well enough. Maybe you got the paper too wet. I also used some spray adhesive which wasn't that tough to remove, but don't remember what kind of adhesive.

    Dougster

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    94

    Default Machinists Reference Block

    I use a Machinist's Reference Block purchased at Grizzly Tools

    http://images.grizzly.com/grizzlycom...88/g/g9650.jpg

    This block is surfaced to .0001 tolerance and has two clamping ledges on it. It's really rather an inexpensive tool and does a wonderful job on my plane blades. They come in all sizes and mine weigh 40 lbs so it doesn't move around.

    If you don't live near a Grizzly store, then i suppose that shipping is expensive, but now that I have one, I wouldn't be without one. I make the hour and a half pilgramage to Grizzly once or twice a year so I didn't have to deal with shipping

    AS for attaching the sandpaper, I simply place it on the block and use two spring clamps to keep it in place. Works fine.

    If you are using glue, I'm told that you only apply the glue to one surface (the sandpaper) and roll in on after it sets up a bit. It is then removable.
    Last edited by David123; 09-05-2006 at 09:13 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    13,189

    Default

    In the long run, the cost of sandpaper far exceeds the cost of Japanese water stones. I swiched over to them from oil stones many years ago and never have regreted it. Tools end up fighteningly sharp!
    JG

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Seabeck, WA
    Posts
    9,745

    Default



    I flatten plane soles on the jointer table using wet-or-dry paper. I use WD-40 to prevent clogging and find just a little does the job....too much and the paper slips around. When that happens, I degrease with TCE and start over with a new sheet of paper. (If you look closely, you can see this 4 1/2 has been used extensively for edgejointing and the sole has centered hollows fore and aft.)

    As to stones, waterstones are cheap and easy to use but wear fast, creating hollows. Flatten them periodically on an indexing surface ala my plane soles, only using water.

    Personally, I think once you learn to sharpen on carborundum or water stones, good novaculite stones are the best investment. These heritage stones require flattening only once or twice in a lifetime, and your grandchildren will use them. Novaculite doesn't occur in Japan.

    http://www.hallsproedge.com/index.html

    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 09-05-2006 at 10:59 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    4,562

    Default

    Thanks for that link Bob. Now I know where to get a couple of replacements for the ones my ex dropped and broke. That is the exact brand, box and everything that I got over 30 years ago. I loved them, until they were broken, of course.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Seabeck, WA
    Posts
    9,745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by capt jake
    ... dropped and broke.
    Did you try epoxy?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    4,562

    Default

    Pieces have gotten lost over the years. I have one small piece of the soft arkansas left.

    I will have to order some 'replacements'

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    229

    Default

    I've used 3M 77 spray adhesive on granite. Comes off fairly easy using a razor blade like a cabinet scraper. Have never tried water. Need to switch to stones sometime...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    151

    Default Sharpening

    I use a piece of marble tile that is shiny smooth on top. I then use various grades of wet paper to sharpen with my hone guide till I reach 2500 grit. Works fine with no slipping. I just wet the whole piece of paper.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    11,171

    Default

    I sharpen on sandpaper. I order several rolls of PSA (aka "stickyback") paper from Klingspor -- alumina zirconia for the coarse stuff, aluminum oxide for the medium grits and silicon carbide for the fine stuff. Alumina zirconia is tough as nails and cuts fast, but is only available in fairly coarse sized and it holds up very well, aluminum oxide cuts fast, but wears through fracturing so it becomes effectively a finer grit over time, and in the finer grits, silicon carbide is the only readily available material. It's problem is that is quite short-lived.

    I had a glass shop cut me several glass plates from 3/8 plate glass (I wanted 1/2 inch but the price went up astronomically). Each plate is the width of the PSA roll paper and 10 inches long. Each grit is affixed to its own piece of glass and sits in a rack. I fabricated a holder sized to the plates.

    This paper has better information on sandpaper sharpening than does the usual "scary-sharp" post from rec.the.woodworker One of the things this paper points out is that the sandpaper progression cited is apparently just what the original poster had on hand. As it turns out, if you consult the coated abrasives guys, there's method to the madness that should be applied, both in selection of type and size of abrasive:

    http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticle...pening7142.pdf

    My grit progression, using the advice from this paper is (using FEPA graded paper, not CAMI):
    • P80 (197 micron)
    • P120 (127 micron)
    • P180 (78 micron)
    • P240 (58.5 micron)
    • P360 (40.5 micron)
    • P500 (30.2 micron)
    • P800 (21.8 micron)
    • P1200 (15.3 micron)
    • P2000 (9.5 micron)
    P2000 is about as fine as hard black arkansas stone.

    This progression gives a 25-30% reduction in grain size at each step. With that kind of reduction, it takes a little as 5 or 10 strokes to obliterate the previous grit's scratch pattern and get a new uniform scratch pattern with the finer grit. Consequently the paper lasts quite a long time.

    With each paper on its own plate, changing the paper is a fairly infrequent occurence, so the adhesive buildup is much less.

    Periodically, of course, you will need to remove the paper and clean the glass. I use a razor blade paint scraper followed by a scrubdown with solvent (acetone works well) and a fine (white) scotchbrite pad.

    Sharpening consists of choosing a starting grit -- if it's just a "touch up", there's no point in going all the way back to 80 grit. the coarse stuff is reserved for restoration. For normal sharpening, P500 is a pretty good place to start. 5 or 10 strokes, change plates and repeat until you've gone through P2000.

    I use a rag or a paint brush on the workpiece between each grit, in order to reduce the possibility of the finer grit being contaminated with dust from the coarser, previous grit.

    Finish up with a few strokes on the back with the P2000 to remove the wire edge and Bob's yer uncle. If you're feeling really compulsive and have one available, a quick buff on a hard felt wheel charged with a chromium dioxide (green) honing compound, will finish the job (as if it really needs it).

    And if you get reall, truly obsessed about it, you can buy microabrasive film from 3M that goes down to 0.1 micron
    Last edited by Nicholas Carey; 09-06-2006 at 02:36 PM.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cape Fear, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,780

    Default Nicholas Carey !!

    Nice writeup!!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    104

    Default

    Thanks everyone. Soaking the sheet and placing on the dry tile seemed to work. Nothing more satisfying than a sharp blade. I now have hairless wrists from testing sharpness.
    Vince

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    a landlocked hill.
    Posts
    427

    Default hijack warning

    Hairless wrists! I scrape slivers off my thumbnail. What other methods do you use to test sharpness?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Plainfield, Massachusetts
    Posts
    14,360

    Default

    Testing to see if the blade will shave the hair on your hand/arm/wrist is one common method. Do it carefully! Ultimately, the best test is to use the blade to do what it was intended to do.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    417

    Default

    I test sharpness by slicing the raised ridges of my fingerprint. Someone once said "they were not that fussy" but if by "fussy" he ment taking too long, then truth is, he was wasting movement with incorrect, or poor technique. Blades "sharp enough for surgery" are possible within a minute after coming off the grinding wheel with a simple oil stone.

Similar Threads

  1. Dave Fleming: On Sharpening Shipwrights Tools
    By Jim Hillman in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-07-2008, 09:43 AM
  2. Stanley RB5 block plane
    By StevenBauer in forum Tools / Materials / Techniques / Products
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-26-2006, 01:53 PM
  3. block plane recommendations
    By Old Salt in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 02-01-2005, 12:01 AM
  4. Repost "Bending Mahogany" (NIA)
    By Ross M in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-26-2002, 02:05 AM
  5. How to sharpen my plane
    By Jim Wellman in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-09-2001, 09:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •