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Thread: E Scow

  1. #1
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    Sep 2005
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    Default E Scow

    I just purchased a 1963, 28"wood E Scow on E-BAY. Will be picking it up this next week.
    It needs work. No rot. Varnished bottom, canvas top side. Both need refinishing. Mast & Boom need refinishing.

    I will keep boat on trailer. only in water for day use.
    What should I finish bottom with? Was thinking of revarnishing.

    I was also thinking of varnishing the topside? I wouldn't mind getting her alittle wet inside. After all she is a racing machine not a cruiser.

    It needs floor boards replaced, but evrything under the decks look as good as the day she was built.

    I would rather not epoxy or fiberglass. Just a nice looking finish that will protect the wood.

  2. #2
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    Default Welcome Bluespruce!

    The e-scow sounds great. Is this the e-scow that was listed on the escow.org in Colorado? What year and make is it? I am an avid scow sailor from Minneapolis, MN. I don't do very much racing. Just alot of fast sailing in a beutiful wooden go fast boat. Mine is a 16 foot M-scow. I also sail on a JBW C-scow that is wood and is trailered. E-scows are awesome machines. Of all the scows I think they are the prettiest and most exciting to sail.

    I look forward to discussing scows alot more here. I've had mine for over 10 years now. Like you, I keep it on a trailer. Over these 10 years my strategy for keeping the boat in good condition has changed. The first piece of advice I would offer is don't rush into major repairs. Sail the boat a season or two before deciding how to handle the best way to keep it. I am assuming that the boat is in good condition. You said there was not any rot that you knew of.

    Don't be surprised if the boat takes on water when you launch it. These racing machines were made almost as light as possible. They do leak. As long as your moving the bailers will have no trouble keeping up with the leaks. However, expect a few inches of water in the bottom of the hull. I don't know how long it would take for one of these hulls to "take up" - swell up to the point of not leaking, but I do know it is longer than an all day sail after sitting on a trailer all week. Don't be disappointed if your feet get wet.

    Decks are cedar planked with canvass over the top. The deck planking is not intended to be watertight. If you plan to varnish the deck be aware of that. Also the deck planking may have some flaws (splits, cracks, knots) that would be unacceptable for hull planking. Many people who want the varnished deck look cover the deck with dynel & epoxy first before varnish. Personnally, I like the look and feel of canvass better. Re-canvassing a deck is pretty easy. Maybe a weekend's worth of work and is fun. I have some directions from Melges Boat Works written around 1970 I can send you or post here.

    Refinishing the hull is more work. If it was me, I would put a few quick coats of varnish or a coat of varnish, then paint on it and go sailing for the season. That would give you a chance to work up a longer term strategy.

    Johnson Boat Works hulls are double planked. The inner layer is diagnal, the outer layer runs longitudnal (bow to stern). The two layers are glued to one another. The inner layer is glued to the ribs also. In scows the frames are called ribs, like in a canoe, since they run an full U shape.

    In Melges boats a single layer of planking was used. On Melges boats the caulking line or bevel between the planks was filled with a VERY hard epoxy that is white in color. It is much harder than the glue that JBW used. It made the hull stiff but causes problems when the boat goes through wet-dry cycles. As a result, the JBW hulls probably leak a little bit less when trailered. But they both leak.

    I sailed mine for about 8 years with it in it's original configuration (varnished hull, canvas deck). I learned a few tricks for helping it to take up faster, like park it on the ground rather than on cement or put sprinker under the hull for a few hours the day before sailing. These things reduced the amount of leaks but did not eliminate them. About 4 years ago I stripped the hull and put a layer of 4 oz e-glass and epoxy on the hull. This was a big job and took away one summer's worth of sailing. I had identified a few soft spots in hard to get at places in the hull. These needed to be fixed/replaced first. Everyone here will tell you that the second quickest way to destroy a wood boat is to fiberglass over a problem (the first is marshmellows and lighter fluid). That is why you really want to know every inch of your boat before jumping into a repair like this. I admit that I am a bit too much of a perfectionist. Any water seeping into my hull was bothering me. Also, long term the wet dry cycles where having negative affects on the hull. These hulls, glue & epoxy mixed with traditional building methods, are designed more with speed in mind than longevity. Your boat must be at least 30 years old - longer than the racing career the builder designed it for.

    The JBW's C I sail on is still in it's original configuration. It does take on water, but the bailers handle that even on light wind days. At this point it does not show a whole lot of degredation due to trailering it. The owner and I have discussed it and at some point will probably put on a layer of e-glass as well. Glassing the hull does make futer repairs more difficult. However, both JBW and MBW hulls are difficult to repair even without glass. The epoxy in the MBW is tougher and less flexible than stuff today. It is neary impossible to cut through to remove a plank (I have done it). The JBW hulls are even more difficult since the planks and both glued and screwed together. Therefore I think that the extra protection and benefit of glassing outweighs the added difficulty of repair.

    I rambled quiet a bit. Time to get back to work. Welcome and hope to hear more from you soon.

    tim

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks Tim,
    The boat is a 1963 Johnson. It came out of North Dakota. I will have it here on the 20th.
    I was thinking along the lines that you have mentioned. I don't want to do anything that will be hard to change later. I am hoping that after a couple of spots recieve some caulk and a good layer of paint or varnish and the bottom should be protected and usable. I am expecting it to take on water, but for the type of fun fast sailing that it will be used for its not a problem.
    I am not sure about the deck? If recanvasing is not dificult I may go with that. My other thought was to epoxy a thin veneer of cedar (sort of strip plank) the deck. I am not worried about adding wieght. She is long past her prime for racing.
    I was going to just sand and varnish the mast & boom, clean and paint or polish all the fittings.

    What kind of paint should I use on the bottom? The boat will be on a trailer most of the time. I want one years worth of protection. Right now there is varnish that is almost worn completely off, so I will be sanding to bare wood.
    What aboat fill for small cracks or dents? Should it be hard (epoxy) or flexible? The bottom is very solid, the cracks and dents are superficial.
    Thanks again for your imput Tim.

    Pat

  4. #4
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    Default X and Y boat questions

    Hey Dave,

    Here is what I know about early X boats. JBW did not start double planking any of their boats until after WWII, in the 1950's sometime. The following is quoted right out of "The History of the Inland Lake Yachting Association". The book is available for purchase at www.ilya.org (I have no involvement with the book or publisher).

    JBW was asked by Len Lilly of White Bear Lake to make a prototype trainer for kids to learn sailing in.

    "Over the winter of 1932-1933, Johnson built four hard chined sloops measuring 15 feet, 6 inches and sporting pointed bows and a relatively short mast - a radical departure from traditional scow design, but built with safety and stability in mind. The four boats went to Len Lilly Jr., Roy Mordaunt Jr., John Bigelow, and Shreve Archer Jr., all of White Bear Lake.
    The prototype boats sailed on WBL during the summer of 1933 showed enough promise that, by 1933, Lilly Sr. made a motion to the ILYA annual meeting that a committee be appointed to consider and recommend a standard design of a small sloop for junior sailors."

    The book goes on to say that the prototypes were shown to other builders in the summer of 1933 and was adopted by the IYLA as a Junior class for the 1934 season.

    It could be that the reason that your boat does not have a number is because it was a prototype. All of the class legal ILYA boats had to be measured by an official ILYA measurer. To keep track of the boats, each one was numbered. Usually a builder put their initials and a hull number on the CB trunk or on some frames in the cockpit. Older JBW scows I've seen had "JBW mm-yyyy number"

    If the boat was a home build it might not have a number, although it would need one to be measured. There were a number of "home build" X boats made either by amatuer builders or sailors who hired a professional builder of other boats to make them an X.


    The book has a small picture of the original construction plan drawn by John O. Johnson. Maybe you could compare the boat to it. Any chance you could trace down the owner history?

    The poor quality of material on deck planks does not surprise me. The left over stuff not good enough for hull planking was used. During the depression JBW struggled pretty hard. They didn't have money to buy wood and there were winters that they couldn't even pay their workers until some boats sold in the spring.

    Y boats were designed post WWII by JBW and adopted as a class in 1947. They were a scaled up version of the X boat with a updated rig. Y boats lost popularity in the 60's and 70's. The last ILYA sponsored Y boat regatta was in 1970. I think some non ILYA fleets existed a little longer. Both X and Y boats were made by a number of boat works at various times. One of the down sides of getting your design adopted as a IYLA class was that it was open for any builder to make. In the 1960's Amundson Boat Works (also of White Bear Lake) was building a lot of Y boats. Amundson was a boat works started in 1890's. They built many types of boats, whitehalls, other pulling boats, displacement hull sailboats and sailing scows. The works was sold to Fletcher Driscoll who ran it in the 1960-70's with the help of one of the Amundson brothers, then in his 80's. It was during this time they built Y's. Pretty much all of the Y boats were built between them and JBW.

    Jason Brown (no relation to me) is the current owner of JBW (now called White Bear Boat Works). Jason is the step son of Skip or Iver Johnson (don't remember which one). I visit there once in awhile and often get into a conversation with Jason about wooden boats. But, like you pointed out, history lessons don't pay their bills and they like it when someone buys a boat. They usually have some old JBW scow in the back that they are repairing for someone though.

    Lot's of talk. My daughter is impressed that I can use the computer this long. Hope this helps.

    Tim Brown

  5. #5
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    Oct 2000
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    Default

    Pat,

    Regarding deck canvass. I found it alittle difficult to find material that was wide enough without any seems. A local place that made custom awnings was were I got mine. For my 16ft scow I think I spent ~$160 for the canvass. You would need twice that. The canvass is both adhered to the deck planking through paint and held in place by being stretched over the edge of the deck and nailed or stapled to the hull. This is underneath the guard rail going around the hull. If you go to http://www.whitebearboatworks.com/Repairs.htmls
    you can see some pictures of it being done.

    A canvass deck provides a nice "no-slip" surface. One of the things I don't like about a varnished deck is that it is going to be as slippery as an ice rink to be standing on it.

    If you plan on doing a quick refinish of the hull that is only intended to last a few years, I would be temped to patch up the canvass on the deck and make it last the two years also. Refinshing the hull would require pulling the nails or staples and getting that folded over section of the canvass loose. Once that section of the canvass gets damaged, the damage spreads quickly. Therefore I opted to do the recanvass job when I was refinishing the hull anyway. Fix little rips and loose sections by spreading some elmers wood glue under the loose canvass and put a brick on it to hold it down until it drys. Patch bigger holes with sections of new canvass. If your replacing a big area of canvass spread some oil base paint or floor sealer on the deck and immediately put the canvass down and paint it with the same. The idea is to get the paint to act like glue. When the deck is patched up, then lightly sand and repaint the whole thing. Exterior grade house paint will work fine.

    As far as the hull, a one or two year finish can be achieved with a good marine varnish or exterior house paint. I had gloss white house paint from Menards on my scow hull and it lasted for about 8 seasons.

    Alot of scows during built during that era had a "blonded" hull finish. This was achieved by mixing white oil base paint and oil base varnish together. I have never tried this myself. The fellow who owns the wood C I crew on has done it. If your interested I could get him to give me a "lessons learned" about it.

    Epoxy mixed with wood flour can be used to fill small dings and cracks.

    Tim
    Last edited by Tim B; 05-10-2006 at 09:36 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default

    The canvas deck is in pretty bad shape. I will need to do something with the deck right away. She has no guard rail around the deck, only a half round brass trim. I am still thinking of a varnished deck, but adding a 1.5" toe rail. I guess i'll decide when I get the old canvas off.

    As for the hull: You recomend epoxy/wood flour for small cracks and dings. Since this boat will live on a trailer, and probable never sit in the water for more than 8hrs at a time I suppose there will not be a lot of expantion and contraction. I was thinking of a flexible filler at first? But maybe thats not needed? We will sand and varnish the hull for this first season. What kind of varnish is good for a trailered boat. Hard? or Flexible? Each brand has so many different versions it's hard to know were to begin.

    Any advise on hull varnish, filler or ideas on alternative deck finishes would be greatly appreciated.

  7. #7
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    Default Filler Options

    Normally, a harder filler like epoxy/wood flour mix would be used to fill dings in planks and a softer flexiable material for longer splits and along caulking lines. The flexable material would move with plank swelling movement.

    However these boats were not built using completely traditional means. The plank layers were glued together and the caulking bevels were filled with something hard too. The same glue I think. That means that the planks are not able to move around like on a traditional carvel hull with soft caulking. Each wet-dry cycle will causes some minor level of damage as the planks swell up against hard caulk and the wood crushes alittle bit. Alternatively the planks dry and want to shrink but can't because they are glued in place so they split.

    I have seen various methods employed each with moderate sucess. WBBW's recommends removing the hard caulk (which they do with a dremmel tool) and filling with 5200. They quote the job as 1/2 person for 3 months or so. Pretty labor intensive. They claim it produces great results but I have never seen the outcome myself.

    Before I e-glassed my scow I would fill splits and open caulking seams with flexiable caulk. I used 5200 at first but found that run of the mill window caulk work just as well. The frustrating part was that at the start of the season I'd get the hull all sealed up and have no leaks. But each time sailing there would be alittle more water seeping in.

    Overall I don't think it will matter too much what you use to fill open caulking seams. Since there is so much hard caulk in the hull, any areas you fill with soft material will be just a tiny %.

    There are better experts here regarding varnish. I typically use Helmsman Spar varnish. That probably makes me sailor trash around here. However, a really good varnish job is weeks of part time work. These guys here can give you a 20 - 30 step program that will allow you to use your hull for a mirror when your done. If you only require it to last a season or two, don't put that much work into it. Make sure the loose stuff is off, major dings filled and surface is clean, no dust. Then 3 coats should be sufficient.

    If you are putting varnish over bare wood I would use a polyurethane. If you try to blond the hull then get oil base paint and oil base varnish.

    Scows usually don't have toe rails. The 1/2 round trim is all they have. Most of the time this is oak. Modern scows have rubber trim and I've seen that on a number of wood scows. The trim around the bow needs to be steam bent. Since that piece takes the most beating, it is the one that ends up rubber most often. Older JBW scows had a brass strip on top of the wood trim going around the bow.

    The deck canvas is stapled or nailed to the hull underneath this trim piece. If the deck is original it was probably nailed with small tacks. Using stainless steel staples works even better. If you do replace the canvass make sure that the underside of the trim piece is protected too. If it is not varnished, it will hold moisture that will cause the canvass underneat it to start to rot.

    tim
    Last edited by Tim B; 05-10-2006 at 05:18 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Pat,

    I came across this website yesterday. It documents restoring/refinishing a 1963 C scow in a very similar manor to what you are planning. Hope you enjoy.

    Tim

    http://www.tosyali.com/2003/1964C-Scow/1964CScow.htm

  9. #9
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    Default

    Tim.
    Thanks for that link. A picture is worth a thousand words.

    You mentioned that you had directions from Melges for recanvasing. I would like to see those if possible. Post here or E-Mail bhfhoney@yahoo.com

    You also said that WBBW's recomended removing hard caulk and replacing with 5200. I don't want to go to that extreme this season so I might use 5200 where needed. I was wondering though, how will the varnish hold to 5200?

    Thanks

  10. #10
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    Default

    My humble opinion is that WBBW's idea of replacing hard caulk with 5200 is a waste. Especially on a JBW hull since the two planking layers are hard glued to eachother anyway. Maybe OK on a Melges hull since it is only 1 layer.

    I used 5200 where needed on mine and then painted over it. Didn't have any problems with paint adhereing to it. During the season, as new leaks developed I would try to seal them up with 5200. I didn't repaint since the hull was painted white and the 5200 I used was white. It does come in brown also. I don't know about how well varnish will stick to it. I would post it as a separate question here on the site. You might get more attention to it that way.

    I will dig up the paper on canvassing. It was a faxed copy someone sent me that even had some handwritten notes from Buddy. I will post it here in the next few days.

    tim
    Tim
    Last edited by Tim B; 05-12-2006 at 12:30 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Planking Descriptions

    This is an email from a former JBW employee. His first name is Willie but I blanked out the rest since I don't think he posts here. He was working at JBW when they were building scows out of wood. I am posting it because of the construction information.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Willie
    Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2004 2:24 PM
    To: timothy.brown@honeywell.com
    Subject: RE: History question of the day


    Read between your lines-

    ----Original Message Follows----
    Subject: History question of the day
    Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 09:33:27 -0700

    Hi Willie,

    Hope your not getting tired of questions. Would you be willing to describe
    the build process used for the double planked JBW boats?

    1. Were each of the planks made from templates, i.e. cut to a template
    shape and then installed on the frames or were the planks spiled (sp?)
    individually as the hull was planked?

    > Melges used templates, Johnson spiled every plank from the outline of
    >the last one.


    2. What was the thickness of the inner layer of planks?

    The first crosslaid layer was always 1/8", the outer layer 1/4" on C
    boats, 3/8" on E boats, 3/8" on A boats.

    3. How did planks that lay along the bilge line get their curved shape
    (across the plank, not along the plank)? Did the planks start out from
    thicker stock and have the bilge curve planed into them with an hand plane
    or were they just flat and steam bent across the bilge?

    > They were flat stock, put in the steam box, and took that shape as they
    >were screwed, hot, to the ribs. After planking, the entire hull was
    >hand-planed with a Bailey/Stanley No. 8 plane, 24" long. The same
    >planes were used to fair the contact face of the ribs before planking.

    4. What glues were used and where? Was the inner planks glued to the
    frames?

    > During my tenure there, the only glue JBW was using was so-called
    >'casein' or 'resorcinol' type glues. It came as a powder, was mixed with
    >water. It's the stuff whose base, I think, was horse's hooves. Nowadays,
    >foolish to use anything other than epoxy. Gougeon/WEST epoxy. Yes, the
    >planks were glued to the ribs.

    5. What was used to caulk the inner layer of planks?

    > No caulk was ever used on a new boat. What you see is the glue oozing
    >out.

    6. What was put between the plank layers? Oiled canvass is traditional but
    you mentioned glue in a previous email. What kind of glue? Does the glue
    soften up with heat (assuming I need to get a plank off)?

    > The same 'casein' glue was used between plank layers, never canvas on
    a Johnson boat. If you do it now, use epoxy. If you glued it right, the
    only way to get a plank off is with a chisel and hammer.

    7. What was the thickness of the outer plank layer?

    > See above.

    8. What was used to caulk the outer plank layer?

    > No caulk was ever used on the outer plank layer. This is the 'recent'
    >method, i.e., 1970s. At the turn of the century, they used to leave a
    >caulking seam, put in the roving (I think it was wool), and some type of
    >caulk over that. S.S. Rabl was a good author for those disciplines, his
    >books are long since out of print, but you could find them through antique
    >book searches; I have one of his books. Even teaches you how to make a
    >chalk line. Not the actual line, but the tool.



    Any answers you could fill in would be great! I'm not currently working on
    a JBW hull but perhaps one is in my future. When I worked on my Melges M I
    had all kinds of trouble finding someone who knew what materials were used
    (glues & caulks). I called MBW numerous times but no one could either
    remember or was around back then and they didn't want to look for any
    records. Next week I'm going to run out to camp st.croix and look at that
    JBW C again. Get some pictures. Then maybe in the spring I'll bid on it
    and it can be my next project boat.


    > The Melges routines are hardly any different. They didn't want to look
    up the records because there are no records, and they get about 5 calls a
    week on subjects like that. If you are going to go to all that work, build
    a new boat from scratch. It won't be a whole lot more work, might be less
    work. A steam box is easy to build. The only adhesive that you will use is
    2-part Gougeon epoxy. Only challenge is finding good white oak (you can use
    red also), and white cedar for the planking. Red cedar is OK too. The hell
    with it...use carbon fiber, epoxy and foam, easier and cheaper to source
    than the cedar. Then you don't even need a steam box. Use the old hull as
    a male mold, build the new one right over it, pull off the new hull, lay up
    interior, et cetera. Start with a rowboat, whaling dinghy, simple shape,
    then do the scow, with the compound curves. Buy the Gougeon Brothers book
    on Wooden Boatbuilding...called the 'Bible' among the boatbuilding literati
    in the 1970s and 1980s. Only one left at Johnson is Skip's stepson Jason
    Brown, and he never built wood boats; when I sawed the last wood form off
    the shop floor in the fall of 1975, he was still in knee pants (and you can
    tell him I said that!).

  12. #12
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    Default

    Not to take the wind from yer sails.............. where ya going to sail that thing?

    I lived in Wy for 6 years and water is scarse but wind is plentiful !!
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  13. #13
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    Default Deck Canvassing Instructions

    This is a re-type of some deck re-canvassing instructions from Melges Boat works. They are from the 1970's. I will put any of (my own comments in parenthesis).

    Melges Boat Works Inc.
    Inland Lake Sailboats

    RE-CANVASING THE DECK OF A WOOD BOAT

    Materials List:
    40 grit sandpaper Decking Canvas
    Sanding Block Non-rusting staples
    Deck planks (if necessary) Staple gun
    Epoxy glue & sawdust Turpentine
    Clear wood sealer Razor knife
    Exterior oil base house paint - white
    Marine enamel in color of your choice
    Varnish

    An M-16 needs: 1.5 qts clear wood sealer, 2 qts house paint, 3 qts enamel, 6 yds of canvas.
    A C boat needs: 2 qts wood sealer, 2 qts house paint, 3 qts enamel, 7 yds of canvas.
    An E boat needs: 4 qts wood sealer, 4 qts house paint, 6 qts enamel, 10 yds of canvas.

    (I used oil based floor sealer and oil based exterior house paint from ACE hdwre-it was the only place I could find oil base paint in qts)
    (I was able to find stainless steel staples. Canvas was natural, untreated #6 bought from a custom canvas & awning business)

    Strip the deck of all hardware, rubrail, cockpit trim and old canvas. Sand the deck with 40 grit sandpaper on a block, until you get down to raw wood. Replace any rotten or broken deck boards, puttying in with an epoxy glue & sawdust mixture or a wood dough. Also putty any large holes or cracks. Clean with a vacuum cleaner.
    (I found that deck planks were nailed on with their flat heads sunk into the cedar planks. I used oil based painter's putty from Menards to fill in the nail holes. Do this after all sanding is done. The painter's putty will gum up sandpaper lightning fast.)

    Apply a coat of clear wood sealer - at Melges we use Carbit brand penetrating floor sealer - but other brands work fine also. Apply the canvas to teh deck while the sealer is still wet (immediately). Be sure there are no loose threads under the canvas. Tightly stretch the canvas from bow to stern and staple at those points. Then go back and work from the bow back, and stretch the canvas from side to side until you reach the stern. Using bronze, or other non-rusting staples and a staple gun, staple the canvas about 1/4" apart. (2 people, 2 staple guns is ideal for this. We stapled 1"x2"x6' strips onto the sides of the canvas. This allowed us good hand holds to stretch the canvas side to side as we both worked down the boat opposite each other.) Now cut out the center part of the cockpit, fold under the edges of the canvas, pull as tight as possible, and staple under the edges of the cockpit. (Experiment with some scrap fabric before you start this whole process to determine the best way to cut and fold into the corners). The sealer under the canvas need not be dry before continuing (my understanding is that you want to continue without letting the sealer dry).

    Apply one coat of a mixture of 1/2 sealer, and 1/2 exterior oil base (white) house paint. After this coat dries, apply a second coat of the white paint thinned down with turpentine. (I skipped that step). (Before applying the color coat, find all the screw holes for deck hardware. Poke through the canvas with an awl into the holes). When this dries, you are ready to apply your color coats.

    You should apply 2 thin coats of your finish color paint. At Melges we use Pettit brand "Ship-N-Deck" paint, but any other marine enamel paint would be fine. Between coats, put your rubrail and cockpit trim back on, and stain and varnish the trim one coat. Cut the canvas off around the edges with a sharp razpr knife. Then apply another coat of varnish to the trim and the final color coat to the deck. Be sure to finish all brush strokes on your final coat aft. (I recommend varnishing all sides of the trim and rub rail. Bare wood on canvas becomes a place where moisture collects. The canvas under the trim will degrade quickly, expecially if not painted.)

    There are two ways to make the job of re-hardwaring easier. One way is to save the old piece of canvas and use it as a pattern. The other is - before applying the first coat of sealer, mark around the mounting holes with magic marker. Then continue as instructed. After the canvas is painted with the white mixture, the magic marker will bleed through. Poke holes though the canvas with an awl. (I used a combination of both methods, making a template out of paper and marking the holes. It was still difficult to find a few of the holes.) Your color coats will then cover up the magic marker lines.

    If you are planning to update your hardware, be sure to put filler blocks under the deck where the new hardware will be installed.

    That is the end of the instructions. Hope you find this helpful.

    tim

  14. #14
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    Tim,
    Thanks for all the great info. You have saved me many, many hours of research. The boat is being moved down here tommorow. I feel like its Christmas eve all over again. Looking at the pile of sandpaper my kids can't understand my excitement.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    19

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    Well its here!
    I spent a good part of saturday inspecting every aspect of the boat. As I expected there will be more work than I had hoped , but thats OK the boat has so much potential and the hardware is in such great shape its worth it.
    A previous owner stored the boat with water inside under a tarp to keep the wood "swelled". needless to say many ribs in the center of the boat are ruined.
    1st. Build shelter next to shop so I can work all summer without have boat in center of shop. (any ideas?) While I have my kids enthusiasm I will have them sand and finish Mast, Boom, and both spinaker poles.
    2nd. Build cradle low to ground so boat is stable and I can work on ribs. (will have a lot of questions)
    3rd. once ribs in roll boat, decide on hull finish. Tim I am leaning towards what you did.
    4rth. roll boat again, finish deck, replace fittings.

    Let the work begin.
    Anyone with experience in temporary shelter, perhaps something I could convert to greenhouse after boat is finished? Minimum 13'wide X 35' long.

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