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Thread: Pipe cot/ berth

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1

    Post

    I'm the proud owner of an early H28 and looking for advice on how to build a pipe cot. The type I have in mind is a full loop of pipe supprted on one side on a couple of brackets fixed to the ribs (so that it will swing up by day) and hang from the deckhead on the other. LFH recommends pipe cots and describes in "Sensible Cruising Designs" how to decorate the underside but fails to describe any details of construction. I know that some modern boats still use them but can't find any information about material, tube size, wall thickness or whether bending or joining the pipe is the best method of changing direction. I originally planned to follow tradition and simply lash a canvas hammock to the frame but it occurs to me that there may be more modern or sophisticated fabrics and/ or lashing systems in that area as well. Some indication of minimum size(width) would also be helpful since I'm a cruising sailor and comfort does come into the equation.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Dana Point, CA, USA
    Posts
    379

    Post

    We use thes on our Nordhavn power yachts frequently. We differ from most people n the construction, but our pipe berths have many thousands of sea miles and no complaints, so here goes:

    We use about a 1 1/2" polished stainless pipe, capped on the ends. There is actually only one pipe on our berths. The rest is canvas. One side of the heavy canvas is attached to the hull, while the other side is looped and sewn around the pipe. the ends, where your head and feet are, are left open. the pipe itslef rests in two U shaped polished brackets mounted to the bulkhead.

    When you want to use it, you unroll it and place the pipe in the brackets. Voila.

    When you want to stow it, you roll the whole thing upon itslef, and have a strap or two to secure it all against the hull. It is neat, clean, and simple.

    And comfortable because it's like a hammock.

    Some of our boats have two sets of U brakcets...one set outboard, and one set further inboard in case the seas are rougher, in which case you would use the inboard position which would give the berth more depth and thus cradle the occupant more.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Brewster, Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    Posts
    896

    Post

    I have two pipe berths that are the only bedding on board my 22ft Bolger sloop. The dimensions were taken off of Phil's plans. They are 24" x 6'2". I'm 5'11" 210lbs and they fit me fine. I used 1 1/2" galvanized pipe and had a local welder bend and weld the ends together into a continous loop to give me a good strong frame. I painted the pipe with spray primer and several coats of enamel. In the nine years they've been aboard there is no sign of corrosion. I had a local upholestry maker sew the canvas using 10 oz. canvas for the cot and 13 oz. canvas as a 1 1/2" border to support the grommets and prevent ripping. The cots have a vinyl binding sewn in all the way around to protect the raw edges. The grommets are spaced at 3 inches apart. They are laced onto the cots using 3/8 dacron line in half hitches all the way around with one continous line that is tied off where they meet. The berths are attached to the sides of the hull by epoxying small blocks with concave grooves at the top to support the pipes. I put polyester straps over the blocks to hold the pipes in place. These straps are just to hold the pipe in place and let the blocks take the weight. The inside of the berths are supported from the cabin ceiling by two adjustable straps. This way you can adjust the cot to the heel of the boat.They also act like lee cloths. The cots stay folded up and out of the way until needed. They fold down quickly to sleep or rest on. You can store your bedding material and clothing behind them when not in use. I've spent up to three weeks on board using these cots. You could make them a little wider for more comfort if need be. For more info, try looking for these books "Improve Your Own Boat" Ian Nicolson and "The Big Book of Boat Canvas" Karen S. Lipe
    "If a man speaks at sea where no woman can hear, is he still wrong?"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    4,723

    Post

    It looks like 1 1/2" is the right pipe diameter, but how thick do the walls need to be? Can something like tubing from chain-fencing work or do you need schedule 40 wall thickness?

    Stu: which Bolger design do you have?

    JB

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