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Thread: Hoagies

  1. #1
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    Every Saturday, in a suburb of Cleveland, the Woolworths made a sandwwich of fresh bread, and ham, and salami, and cheese. Topped with Eyetalliand dressing and shredded iceburg.

    It was some ethnic thang, I wanta say Polish or Lithuanian. There was some Philadelphia connection.

    Boy they were good! We could only afford them five times a summer. Around a buck, back when a dollar was real money.

  2. #2
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    italian ish, and being from S.E. pa I know them well. also known as a sub., submarine sandwich etc. don't forget the tomato and onion

  3. #3
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    "YOU WANT HOTS WITH THAT?!"

  4. #4
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    Yeah man, hots!

    So where does the word "hoagie" come from? It sounds Polish or otherwise mid European. And there were a lot of Poles in Cleveland.

  5. #5
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    There is some indication that the name "hoagie" is derived from type of sandwich eaten by the shipbuilders that worked on Hog Island.

    Hoagie

  6. #6
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    Angry

    Donn, your a fast draw.

  7. #7
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    I heard them called "zepps" as well; presumably after "zepplin". Ever heard of a pepper and egg sandwich; it is breakfast fare that I have only seen in Philly.

  8. #8
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    [img]smile.gif[/img] Keep the Hoagie lore coming. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    They were a treat. I've eaten my share of subs and Italians, but there was sumpthin different in those Hoagies. Only on Saturday. It was special when mom said, let's have hoagies.

    [ 12-26-2005, 06:29 PM: Message edited by: ishmael ]

  9. #9
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    It is often the roll that makes the hoagie. Lots of great Italian bakeries around Philly.

    Recipe

    [ 12-26-2005, 06:40 PM: Message edited by: Karl A. Hilbert ]

  10. #10
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    Here's the Italian

    Italian

  11. #11
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    around philly though, a real hoagie is made on a roll from a small local bakery called amaroso's.I have had the sandwiches at others areas of the country, but without those rolls they don't taste the same

  12. #12
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    .
    I ate Hoagies in Philly and the famous Cheese Steak Sandwich too;loved 'em both. I had several different kinds of "subs" when I lived up in Boston. Had absolutely delicious muffalatta's in New York, but better'n all of them is the " Po Boy " sandwich, from the South.

    Fried oyster Po Boy's, shrimp Po Boys, Ham n' Cheese PoBoys', or, you name it ! Fantastic !
    'Course, I think a Po Boy is really nothing more than a sub, or a Hoagie, or a muffalatta by another name, only better tasting.

  13. #13
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    When I was 21 I worked at an ancient sheet metal shop in South Camden. You could walk for blocks on the brick sidewalks and never hear a word of English. Everyone sat out in front of their apt buildings. I used to buy steak sandwiches and hogies at a little (Italian of course) shop. Wonderful! Later I got a job teaching school in Blackwood Terrace NJ. I'd give one of the kids money for a hogie at a little place across the street. They'd load it with hot peppers to see if I could take it. I ate every one they brought me!

  14. #14
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    (an eight-inch roll that became the standard for the modern-day hoagie)
    Sounds like 'alf a hoagie to me. Usually around here it's a 14 or 15 inch loaf.
    I asked one "sub" maker in the SF bay area to put mine in the pizza oven for a few, to toast it up a bit, I thought he'd die. Kept shaking his head as he finished up with the lettuce and onion. It was better but still no hoagie.

  15. #15
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    Hoagie was also the name of a person, the person that drove the horse that pulled the canal boats on the Erie Canal.

  16. #16
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    Hoagie Charmicacal, too. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  17. #17
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    It is "sub" in most of NJ, but Hoagie around philadelphia. There seems to be some connection between the oven-toasted variety and the term "grinder."

    The oven-toasted subs are absolutely great, same ingredients, but the cheese is placed over the lettuce, tomato, and onions, then the sandwich is placed, open, in the pizza oven just long enough to toast the bread and melt the cheese.

    Its like baked alaska, hot on the outside and cold on the inside.

    Quiznos doesn't even come close.

    One big debate is whether a hoagie should have the top of the bread cut clean off, the meat and dressings laid on the bottom piece, then the top piece lowered down onto it, or, as is more common in south jersey, the bread is sliced from one side, but the other side is left attached, and the meat is layered in sideways, covering both the top and bottom of the bread, and the lettuce, tomato, etc, is sort of inside and contained by the meat.

    The first method, cut all the way through, construct a horizontal layer cake, I perceive to be a north jersy thing, the second method, cut from the side, wrap the meats around the salad, is a south jersey thing. The second method is best for the hot toasted grinder, though.

    White House subs in Atlantic City, undeservedly famous for its subs, serves a hideous concoction unworthy of the name. Made on "atlantic city bread," a style that produces something as flavorful as wonder bread, it uses the side-construction method, but they cut the meat very thick, and they use genoa salami (which to me is like coarse baloney, yuck), instead of dry salami or best of all, soppresata.

    Cheese steaks suck as well, sheer horror succeeding on hype alone.

    However, in South Philly, right across from one of the most famous cheese steak emporia, is a pplace that specializes in the roast pork, broccolirabe and provolone sandwich. These roast pork sandwiches are the real deal, no reconstituted powdered american cheese poured over formed and shaped lips, ears and assholes. this is genuine roast pork, sliced thin, fried with bitter brocolirabe, then sharp, pungent, real provolone is melted over the top. A culinary treat, as opposed to a guilty trash food pleasure.

    [ 12-27-2005, 11:22 AM: Message edited by: PatCox ]

  18. #18
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    Youse guys are makin me hungry...

    However, in South Philly, right across from one of the most famous cheese steak emporia,

    Would that be "PAT's" ??

    [ 12-27-2005, 11:42 AM: Message edited by: Gary E ]

  19. #19
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    yup it's PAT'S, cheesesteak capital of the world right by the stadiums....and we wonder why Andy Reid is a little on the heavy side

  20. #20
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    doubled that for some reason

    [ 12-27-2005, 12:09 PM: Message edited by: jack grebe ]

  21. #21
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    They are NOT hoagies, grinders, or subs. They are called heros. Best had with the works from a NYC deli.

  22. #22
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    thats a keiser roll donn.....got a history on that too

  23. #23
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    only if it has a frozen...nonfunctioning left hand....At least Willie did...

  24. #24
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    Is "hero" related to "gyro"?

  25. #25
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    Pat's??? Tony Lukes on Oregon Ave.

  26. #26
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    Thats right Troutman.

  27. #27
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    Kaiser rolls. . .must be the Brokeback Mountain chat room. How about some little finger cakes to.
    Kaiser rolls. . .ha, ha.

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