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Thread: Lofting Paper?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
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    Wappapello, Mo.,USA
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    I'm getting ready to start a new boat that involves lofting. I want to use paper instead of plywood and will need a sheet 4'x18'min. What do people use for lofting paper and where do they get it?
    Thanks,
    Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Lincolnville Center, ME, USA
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    595

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    Mylar is available up to 60" wide from Charrette. If you are intent on avoiding plywood, mylar is probably the only workable choice.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 1999
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Check with your local decent builders supply house-ask for red rosin paper. kind of stiff and more durable than many-and more waterresistant.
    Illigitimi non carborundum

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
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    brunswick,ga,us
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    I used that transparent (actually semi-opaque) film used for chart overlays. Easy to roll up, cut, draw on and erasable. Available thru most office supply stores. Being transparent, its easy to lay over the frame stock and mark out lines.
    Just a thought.
    Matt

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    Berryville, VA
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    3,864

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    Glen-l has pattern transfer paper, in 2'x16' slices, 7.95 apiece.
    Berryville, VA: A quaint little drinking community with a farming problem.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
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    Virginia
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    I used Red Rosin builder's paper, and next time I'd use plywood. The paper shrank when water dripped on it (rainy day; leaky shed) and was fragile enough to worry me as I crawled around on my hands and knees.

    Any special reason you're avoiding plywood? It's more expensive than red rosin paper, but a 4x18 lofting bed is only 3 sheets of ply with plenty left over.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
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    Wappapello, Mo.,USA
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    Thanks for the info, guys. I might just reconsider and spring for 3 sheets of ply. I'll need it anyway for the planking.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    Eagan, Minnesota, USA
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    10,480

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    Local building supply store has 4'x8' sheets of melanine paneling that has reasonable (not great) tooth for a pencil, about $us7 each.
    Await dreams, loves, life; | There is always tomorrow. | Until there is not.

    Grieving love unsaid. | Tomorrow will fail someday. | Tell them today, OK?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Lincolnville Center, ME, USA
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    I mentioned mylar because it is completely dimensionally stable, and very tough. Red rosin paper 18' long could change over that dimension by 2-3" with large changes in humidity. And it's fragile.

    If expense is your concern, then mylar would defeat the purpose; that much mylar would probably more expensive than the plywood, if you buty lumber yard plywood.

    Plywood is great for a lofting, and can be recycled when you're done. Loftings tend to take a lot of grief - more than you'd imagine if you haven't done one - even one small enough that you're not crawling around on it (mine was 12' x 40').

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    New Hampshire
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    A good source of zero cost ply is when they open a new lift of material at the local home center. Some material in particular lauan is covered with 1/8 inch ply for protection when shipping. Keep your eyes open when they uncover it you can get it for zero $. I have got quite a few which I use for various templates. I also laminated 3 thicknesses into a 38 ft long spiling batten, which only cost me a few bucks for 1/2 gal of white glue and a few tacks.
    TALLY HO
    Ken

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA USA
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    Heh. I was just at the orange box to pick up a piece of 3/4" birch ply to finish a job. I usually go to a plywood wholesaler, but I was in a hurry.

    Anyway, the guy in the store helped me take off the first sheet (which was damaged) from the pile. I offered to help put it back, and he said, "No, I'm gonna put it out back in the dumpster."

    I, being of sound mind and Scottish ancestry, immediately said "I'll take care of it for you. I'll just toss it in the back of my truck."

    He said, "No, we have a crusher out back and we crush the damaged pieces."

    They crush the damaged pieces.

    THEY CRUSH THE DAMAGED PIECES!!!!

    You may not be able to get the damaged luaun.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
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    No accounting for the mentality of the Big Box! I was in Home Despot last month picking up a sheet of birch ply and the top sheet had a three foot gouge across the face where some clown had dragged the corner of the sheet on top across it. Didn't break the veneer, just a scrape. I asked the guy in the orange vest, "You wanna sell me this sheet at a discount because of the gouge?" (Obviously, I only need ONE good side.) He says, "Sure! I write it up for you." He pulled a book out of his vest and stuck a "floor sample / discount" receipt on it for three bucks! I was one happy camper. LOL Go figger?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    I hope that crushing desease doesn't spread to New Hampshire, I think I will make frequent trips back to the orange box again to restock my supply just to be prepared.
    Pehaps you just got someone with an orange apron who is keeping himself or a friend supplied. Try again one never knows.
    TALLY HO
    Ken

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Austin, Texas
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    The Glen-L stuff is actually a long piece of carbon paper. It is for transferring patterns to stock, not for lofting.

    [ 02-26-2003, 08:33 PM: Message edited by: Steve Lansdowne ]

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Atlanta
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    2,250

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    Are we telling Home Depoe stories ? I was in the rope department the other day getting some steel cable and some fittings when I noticed a strange smell . I was intent on reading some info on a package and so ignored this for a while , but it got worse and worse till I was forced to Look . There was one of the Men in Orange trying to cut a length of 1 in. Manila on the hot knife intended for the synthetics . Smoke was pouring off and the part on the knife was smoldering . He stuck to his task , sawing back and forth faster and faster , producing more and more smoke .I finally had to tell him to Please Stop That because he was going to burn the place down ; why don't you try a knife ; ect .

    [ 02-25-2003, 08:49 PM: Message edited by: Bill Perkins ]
    The creation of beauty is more satisfying and joyous than mere possession.

    John Gardner

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Wisconsin--Lake Michigan, where the water tastes funny
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    Paper shrinks; packing material from plywood stacks is too thin--it would need some kind of backing, e.g., plywood; mylar is good, stable, etc. but expensive and needs backing, e.g., plywood. So why not use A/C plywood, or some 1088 grade if you can use it later for planking? Or to loft another boat?

    As for transferring, IMHO the old laid out tacks method is still the simplest and most accurate.
    Pricking through mylar is OK, too, but there is some chance of slippage if not done with care.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    162

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    If you are really looking for wide paper check with your friendly local photographer. Many times the last ten or so feet cannot be used because it cannot be draped to hide a horizon line. I would bet you could get all the paper you needed for nothing. Photo background paper is of good quality and pretty stout as paper goes. The most common widths are 4', 8' and 10'. White is probably the most common color. Heck even if it was walked on a little it wouldn't hurt anything much.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Quadra Island,B.C.
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    I used a few sheets of medium density fibre board (MDF) It paints well,is smooth as ice and your eraser can be a small paint brush or an eraser of course. Cheaper than plywood.

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