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Thread: I liked Ike. Still do.

  1. #1
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    Default I liked Ike. Still do.

    I like the way he climbs on the jeep to get in the plane. That P-51 looks like an early model. Why is a crewman riding on the wing? Ike generated a couple of laughs at the end.
    ITS CHAOS, BE KIND

  2. #2
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    He must be Ike's wing man.

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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quite a few missions on that Mustang, the joke was I think when the pilot was filling out his log.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    cool bit of film
    demonstrating the allies complete air superiority on that day
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    "Wingman" was helping the pilot taxi. Visibility straight ahead over the engine was severely limited, and the passenger is the Supreme Commander. You can see the "wingman" signaling the pilot with his hands. I've seen video here on WBF of a whole group of P-47 Thunderbolts with "wingmen" taxiing for takeoff. They jump off the wing at the end of the runway; maybe ride a truck back to coffee break. Haven't seen film showing that practice to be universal. Maybe it was an option exercised by individual Operations Officers.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    So do I! Still looking after an icon of his "Atoms for Peace" program.
    Savannah fog.jpg
    You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Still a good--looking freighter, Bob ! We steamed near her in 1978 / 1979, if that photo is current, she has withstood 'the ravages of time' quite well ! !



    Rick
    Charter Member - - Professional Procrastinators Association of America - - putting things off since 1965 " I'll get around to it tomorrow, .... maybe "

  8. #8
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    I was an Adlai Stevenson fan, even at my young age. But compared to today’s Republicans, Ike was a saint.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    that is a neat clip. My dad flew in the back of a P-51 that was stripped of guns and modified for aerial surveys of Saudi Arabia. He worked for Aramco.

  10. #10
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    Default I liked Ike. Still do.

    I'm a little dubious about this being Ike flying recon to plan strategy for the Battle of the Bulge.

    This is clearly summer. The Battle of the Bulge was late December. And we (Allied Forces) got pretty much sucker punched at the Bulge.

    They were expecting localized counterattacks from the Germans, not a major offensive with a quarter million soldiers and 1600 artillery pieces.

    Allied forces were stretched pretty thin in the Ardennes at the time -- a lot of the units there were pretty depleted at the time and replacements weren't coming fast enough. The 99th Infantry Division, my dad's unit, was brand new, completely green and unblooded (they'd only arrived in-theatre in November and went on the line December 6), and, so he told me, they had responsibility for a sector some 20 miles wide. They were stretched thin.

    Not a planned battle.
    Last edited by Nicholas Carey; 01-24-2023 at 11:48 AM.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  11. #11
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    I share doubts about this being over the Bulge.

    BTW: I was about 12. We were living in New Haven. My mom was slowly driving our 57 Ford Country Squire. We were near Yale, approaching a crosswalk when a guy ran out and motioned for us to stop. He even put his hands on the hood/bonnet. After a few seconds a gaggle of suits walked across. One of whom was Adlai Stevenson. My mom throughly embarrassed us by rolling down the window and yelling “Thank you, Mr Stevenson!”. I don’t know what the thanks were for, but he waved back.
    ITS CHAOS, BE KIND

  12. #12
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Another website says this was July 44 in preparation for the battle of the Bulge. BS. No one knew such a battle would happen. The Allies didn’t do a routing breakout from Normandy till August, Operation Cobra.
    Ike’s pilot was Pete Queseda, who is credited as the father of ground support including direct communications between units on the ground and the planes.
    ITS CHAOS, BE KIND

  13. #13
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    "Wingman" was helping the pilot taxi. Visibility straight ahead over the engine was severely limited, and the passenger is the Supreme Commander. You can see the "wingman" signaling the pilot with his hands. I've seen video here on WBF of a whole group of P-47 Thunderbolts with "wingmen" taxiing for takeoff. They jump off the wing at the end of the runway; maybe ride a truck back to coffee break. Haven't seen film showing that practice to be universal. Maybe it was an option exercised by individual Operations Officers.
    It seems like a really good idea for most WW2 single engine fighters, which tend to be taildraggers with large diameter propellers, resulting in a very “nose up” attitude on the ground. Dave Hadfield can tell us more but I think that without a “wing man” the procedure is to repeatedly swing the nose from one side to the other using the brakes, which of course increases brake wear.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  14. #14
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    "I share doubts about this being over the Bulge."

    As do I. I might also question the July 4/44 date as at that time the German fighter force were in the midst of a week-long offensive in the skies over Normandy. Canadian Spitfire squadrons who were primarily occupied with close ground support had been given the green light to go after the greatly increased #'s of enemy fighters, with much success. I would wonder at the wisdom of the Supreme commander of Allied forces flitting around behind enemy lines at that particular moment.
    Having a member of the ground crew assist the pilot by riding the wing during taxiing was a regular occurrence with the Spit squadrons. / Jim
    Last edited by chas; 01-24-2023 at 12:53 PM.

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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Still a good--looking freighter, Bob ! We steamed near her in 1978 / 1979, if that photo is current, she has withstood 'the ravages of time' quite well ! !



    Rick
    Oh she is well loved, here's a recent picture. The NRC and other agencies often use the Ike Room (former passenger lounge) for meetings.

    savannah wicklien.jpg
    You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Unlike all but a very few museum ships, Savannah is maintained by the feds. Most are funded by non profit fairly local groups.
    ITS CHAOS, BE KIND

  17. #17
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Bow View Post
    Unlike all but a very few museum ships, Savannah is maintained by the feds. Most are funded by non profit fairly local groups.
    Thankfully required as long as the nuclear license is active. She did benefit from some historic grants for cosmetic restoration. My organization is concerned with finding her a home when the license is terminated, right now expected in the first quarter of 2025.

    Atoms_For_Peace_symbol (00000002).jpg
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  18. #18
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Adams View Post
    My organization is concerned with finding her a home when the license is terminated, right now expected in the first quarter of 2025.
    now i understand why you're thinking of giving up your current boat

    making room for savannah
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    now i understand why you're thinking of giving up your current boat

    making room for savannah
    I may be broke but I have the coolest toy on the planet!
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    You must be the change you wish to see in the world."
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  20. #20
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "I share doubts about this being over the Bulge."

    As do I. I might also question the July 4/44 date as at that time the German fighter force were in the midst of a week-long offensive in the skies over Normandy. Canadian Spitfire squadrons who were primarily occupied with close ground support had been given the green light to go after the greatly increased #'s of enemy fighters, with much success. I would wonder at the wisdom of the Supreme commander of Allied forces flitting around behind enemy lines at that particular moment.
    Having a member of the ground crew assist the pilot by riding the wing during taxiing was a regular occurrence with the Spit squadrons. / Jim
    Ike could no more fly over enemy lines than could Patton, Bradley or Montgomery; they all received Ultra decrypts.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  21. #21
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    but compared to today’s republicans, ike was a democrat.
    ftfy.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    Tks Andrew. I may have been a little facetious regarding the ‘flitting about’ part, given the claim at the start of that video clip.
    F2717F6D-D7BA-4733-A170-56FF30F1C285.jpg
    They did have the squadron info correct. / Jim

  23. #23
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    wingman flies behind the leader in formation, not sure if its to the right or left but offset

  24. #24
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    Default Re: I liked Ike. Still do.

    In this case we're talking about the groundcrew guy actually riding on the wing, which is why I put "wingman" in quotes (").

    Quote Originally Posted by shortboot View Post
    wingman flies behind the leader in formation, not sure if its to the right or left but offset

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