Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Decorah, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    208

    Default Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    We've got threads when videos come out on other YouTube channels, but I'm not sure if I've seen one for Sailing Magic Carpet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr1IGQQNt_k

    I enjoy watching Maya and Aladino and in this recent video, they visited a wooden boat museum in Scandinavia. (Is it bad that I can't remember what country they are in right now?) There's some cool footage, including a gorgeous clinker hull where the plank laps are pegged together with what I have always thought of as "tree nails". But the thing I had never seen before on a boat (not saying much) was that the pegs were back-wedged like I would on a staked chair or bench.

    Screen Shot 2023-01-09 at 10.53.51.jpg

    Screen Shot 2023-01-09 at 10.54.34.jpg

    I guess I've heard much more about copper rivets, but wooden rivets were a really interesting technique to me.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Conway, MA
    Posts
    6,242

    Default Re: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    Classic!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    beer city usa
    Posts
    119,815

    Default Re: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    3,821

    Default Re: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    There is another version for big boats, the holes are bored nearly through the frame, with a wedge inserted into a split in the end of the trunnel before driving. When hammered home the wedge bottoms out and the trunnel is never coming out. Make sure the wedges are aligned to apply force with the grain, not across it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,304

    Default Re: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    So the trunnel is a tight press fit in the plank, and wedged into the sawn frame? This actually sounds too permanent to me!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    60,041

    Default Re: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    Quote Originally Posted by robm View Post
    So the trunnel is a tight press fit in the plank, and wedged into the sawn frame? This actually sounds too permanent to me!
    It is wood. If you want to take it out for any reason drill it out with an auger.'
    The Shetland sailing sixarens used to be maintained by disbanding them to check for rot in the faying surfaces. The trunnels were bored out to release the frame (band), which were then replaced after any repairs were carried out.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,062

    Default Re: Tree-nailed back-wedged clinker?

    Around here clinker boats held together entirely using back wedged juniper pegs is a thing of the past. None has survived to our time. Though oral tradition has it that some old ones were in existence as late as the mid 19th century. The sole survivor being a mid 19th century knop from Korsnäs partially pegged and partially nailed. It is now preserved in a museum. All other old boats are clench nailed.

    On the western coast of Sweden they continued pegging boats together well into the 20th century.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •