Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 59

Thread: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    WoodedBoat Forum... Hello!

    I've been soaking up the knowledge contained herein for many years now (at my grandpa's knee, almost, were he a boatbuilder or an internet user....) At long last, I find myself possessed of a question that must-needs-be asked in these byte-worn pages.

    So... the age old question; what is the best boat.... for "x"?

    And before you ship your tobacco-stained piped, hike out starboard (to balance my disappearing weight), and toss me overboard for asking such a lubberly question (pretty much used all the good nautical terms there, I think) read on. I actually have a list of requirements. In order of importance, no less!

    1st. She must be a sailboat. See point 3. And besides... sailboat.

    2nd. She must be buildable by a very capable amateur, but quickly and without steamers, arcane hand-tools, or exotic timbers. I live in Texas and have a full-time job; I'd love to build a period-accurate replica of a pilot cutter that would shame the Bristol channel beauties, but it's not practical. Plywood desired, nail-and-glue preferred, but stitch-and-glue is acceptable.

    3nd. She must be less than 14ft OA; I'm not a-feared of the eye of the lawman, but neither do I court it. In Texas, one must humbly request that the game warden approve one's craft if she be o'er 14 ft in her lines. This also applies to any form of boat with motorized contraptions applying forward pressure to her stern or interior crossmember to allow one to get where one is going without resorting to vagaries of the wind. I'd rather not have to get 'er registered, inspected, etc. One day, with another boat, but not at the most.

    4rd. Simple traditional rig, no stays. Preferably sprit-sail or lugger. Sailing is the priority, not playing with my bits of rope at the boat-ramp.

    d. She should be of fairly shallow draft; Texas lakes run deep in places, but they have many a shallow bay perfect for modern day buccaneering.

    5th. She should capable of carrying a substantial load (2-3 adults) and still make way to windward. Speed in doing so is not a priority; being able to get back to her trailer BEFORE the weekend is over is. I have all day, I don't want to spend it worrying if I'll miss work on Monday because I was marooned upwind of the boat ramp.

    6th. Preferably no cabin; wide side decks and foredecks for comfort in a blow or cold weather, yes, but if I need to overnight, I'll do so ashore in a tent, or with a custom made cover pulled over the whole boat. I have more need of elbow room (2 daughters and a wife) than I do of questionable sleeping room.

    With these mild and not at all demanding specifications in mind... where might I find plans for such a craft? I've perused many websites and seen many good craft. Weldsford's SCAMP, many of Selway-fisher's designs, several of Bolger's boats, even a few fiberglass wonders I considered purchasing, and of course the lovely small boats of Atkin's (I know, not plywood). In the end, I found myself with the same issue with all; for their length, they don't look very big. And when they look as though they would feel big, they are too long. (looking at you, Selway-Fisher Skylark 16).

    I am currently building a second Bolger Elegant Punt to complement my first (wonderful little craft, these but they aren't the sort of thing two adults would spend much time in). Multiple punts, multiple adults, racing each other would be a recipe for great summer fun. However, in the cold waters of wintertime Texas, racing such small craft is likely to end up chilly and wet. In the summer, one has plenty of friends and bystanders who are eager to learn the joys of sailing, but whom one wouldn't trust alone with a 70sqft canvas in a 8ft boat. Liability being what it is these days, not to mention the likelihood of loosing a pleasant little boat.

    I now want something bigger. Help?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Location
    Traverse City, MI, USA
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    You want beam for all those people in a boat under 14 feet. You'll be sitting side by side in that length, so having room port to starboard is what you need. Plus, you want the stability from a wider boat--having 3 adults who can't move without causing everyone else to adjust is not fun.

    My first impression would be an Ilur or Beg-Meil by Vivier, or a Tammie Norrie by Oughtred.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    You grasp my needs admirably swiftly! I agree and have been eyeing more of the "pram" variety of sailing vessels for exactly the reasons you elucidate. (just blew my allowance on 50 cent words there....)

    Ah, Tammie Norrie... she's beautiful, as are nearly all of Mr. Oughtred's craft. I've seen her before but dismissed her (perhaps without justice) as being too fiddly a build for my backyard efforts. Am I wrong in thinking so?

    I have seen Vivier's boats before, but it was long ago, before the fortune of experience and good job were my lot, expanding the possibilities of bigger and better boats. Ilur ( in it's clinker form) is so close to my wants that I'm tempted to end the search here. I've been browsing for weeks; how did I miss this? I saw his "Morbic 10" just the other day on Duckworks, but it was a bit small, so I passed on.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Location
    Traverse City, MI, USA
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    I grasp your needs because I have a big family

    I'm not a builder so I can't advise on the difficulty of building one or another.

    A prom nose would be great to get volume in a short boat. I just don't know of any in the 14 foot range (they seem to be either shorter, as tenders, or longer as row/sail boats (Seil 18). There is a Nuthatch pram on the Duckworks site but I don't know anything about it.

    I would throw in an Arch Davis Penobscot 14 just because I personally find it so pretty.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    A good thing to hear!

    Fair enough! He DOES say that it is "easier to build", tho...

    Exactly the difficulty I find myself in: they are actually very "shippy" looking little boats (the Elegant Punt has rewarded my pocket and my labor admirably in that regard), but they do seem to be rare in the size I'm looking for.

    Ah, unfair shot, sir! Any sailor is a sucker for a sheer like that! If I had the time, ah, the wine-glass sterns and beautiful prows I'd craft....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Thank you for overcoming the hesitation! More eyes are better (and see more boats!)

    It always worries me to modify a good designer's plan; they know much better than I how their boat should handle. Plus, I'm one of those fellows that isn't much good at stopping when the stopping is good. I'd try to shorten her an inch and end up giving her a pram bow and a full cabin.... Still, all that said, do you suppose the modification would hurt her any? She does fit my needs well (especially in the ease of building), even if she hasn't the classic lines of Ilur...

    I'm fond of them myself, but I've found that in power-boat territory they have an unnerving tendency to pound unmercifully in any kind of a wake. That's not enough to prevent me building one, but just the reason I had overlooked Mayfly. It's no concern in a breeze when you're sailing on her chines, but Texas is a land of sporadic and untrust-worthy winds. Then again, my flatties have all been of the smaller variety (or aluminum mud-boats *shudder). Have you experienced better from the larger ones?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    5,183

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    If you don't mind the aesthetics (which fall into a category of their own here) an Oz Goose sounds like it would check most of your boxes. Probably about as far from a Bristol Channel Cutter as you can get and, in fact, closre to a cement mixing trough, but they're a truly impressive little boat.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Oh, that makes sense. Especially in sheltered waters. I believe I shall look further into this. The Mayfly to sail and Ilur to admire in my backyard....

    An endorsement from one has has been and done is always better heeded than any amount of blather from armchair sailors, I find. I shall keep that in mind.


    Avast!! Ta the bottom with any sailor caught on the seas with Harbor Fright special sail! *kicks the wife's polytarp damaged needles under the couch and out of sight* Ignore the bit' o blue canvas on me own craft, tis only a.... rain cover, for our Northeast Texas rainstorms, y'see!

    Understandable, but I always think the fellows who have been out and done it (even if it's not the "right" way *eye-roll*) tend have better stories than the fellows who spend all their time varnishing the brightwork. I'll not be sailing the world in a J Class sloop any-time soon, but I have a fine chance of having an adventure with my toddler matey's aboard of a flat-bottom skiff!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Hugh,

    I wondered if the venerable Bolger Brick or it's descendants would make an appearance here! I considered it long and hard, I assure you. In fact, I may build one next summer, just for the fun of it.

    *hushed whisper* I've heard tales of their speed, in the right hands.... 15 knots or so, in one extreme case...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,772

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    I think it's gotta be a catboat to do the job. Wittholz has a 14'11" one that would be nice, but yes, you'd have to squeeze 11" out of it -- if the authorities actually come around with a measuring tape. Do they? At any rate, you won't find a roomier cockpit in any other boat this length.

    The other option is to stretch a Scamp out to 14'. That would do the job, too.


    -Dave

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,714

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    The ilur is a mighty boat, but a bit big for your needs at 14’8”. The Morbic 12 is very similar, but within your requirements.
    7DF30AEF-6577-409B-B3D3-1EF4084460CB.jpg
    B0D6F216-D148-4DC1-BBF7-3C3910E5C8AA.jpg
    B7468342-459D-40AA-8953-56511E3AE2FA.jpg

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Woxbox,

    I was JUST pricing the Wittholz plans today! I think the one I was eyeing was just under 14ft? I may be mistaken... Then I posted here and got sidetracked...
    Anyway, to answer your question, yes, they will come a-measuring. Many people and badges Texans may be willing to ignore or jeer, but the game warden is not one of them. Within his bailiwick, he is very nearly all-powerful. And where he isn't, he usually thinks he is. Even if you're in the right, it only takes one with a nasty attitude to give you a very bad time for a very long time.

    John Hartman,

    The bigger the better, but I didn't realize Ilur was over 14ft? Oops.
    That Morbic 12 looks beamier in those photos than in the ones I saw previously. Any idea how easy/difficult these little clinker-ply boats are to build?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,714

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Perhaps you were looking at Mr. Vivier’s 10 footer, also called Morbic. The CNC kits are very approachable for a homebuilder; different kit suppliers will have kits that are more or less complete, and some, like Clint Chase, have kits that are most sincerely complete. The whole concept of the interior furniture, bulkheads and stringers becoming the building jig in this type of build is well recognised now, but still mind bending to me for its combination of ease and speed of build, strength, and efficient use of materials. You will still need to learn how to cut gains and fashion rolling plank bevels, but those are not terribly challenging skills to muster as an amateur new to glued lap construction.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    620

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Hi,
    I suggest you have a really good ponder about how many will be sailing in the boat together. When I was growing up my father had an 11' dinghy which we rowed, sailed & motored with endless fun doing lots of highly dangerous maneuvers that fortunately came to naught (she was a very forgiving dinghy) - but when sailing we had generally with 2 or 1 people in the boat, unless we were motoring.
    So, if you want to sail with 4 people I'd suggest a minimum of 16' LOA, if you want to sail with 2 or possibly 3 then you could get away with 14-15'.

    Glued clinker is not difficult - my boats don't sink!!

    The Ilur is lovely (watch Roger Barnes's video on youtube), Paul Gartside's designs are great, I am an Oughtred fan. Is licensing/registering the boat really difficult? I thought this would happen when I had to register my 17' day launch (internal diesel) and my fears were unfounded - it was really easy. And we ca't let a wee bit of admin get in the way of our dreams can we!!

    Bon Chance Neil

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Decorah, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Texas, plywood, shallow, sub-14’, how about the Welsford Saturday Night Special which was literally designed for tat scenario: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-Special-quot, https://duckworks.com/saturday-night...tant-download/

    Lug rig, easy building, safe, dry, takes plenty of weight. What’s not to love? (Okay, it’s not as salty looking as a Morbic or an Ilur, but it’s a f’real boaty boat.)
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    dfw
    Posts
    1,573

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    MakoShark, when you spec'd 2-3 adults you virtually blew the <14' sailboat off your list

    under IDEAL conditions that much weight and many peeps can happen

    factor in ANY unforeseen conditions/circumstances you put yourself and passengers at risk of getting WET

    amish rob's suggestion to consider Jim Michalak's MayFy 14 would meet your skills level and building method specs

    Jim's book is a very good one and it uses the MayFly 14 as an example of how to build a nice 14 footer

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/15525547916...3ABFBMiqfQ25Fh

    Welsford's Saturday Night Special mentioned above is not a very good boat for a beginner and would generate great frustration to one w/ your OP stated skills level

    IMHO it would do you well to reconsider your goals

    either a larger vessel or less peeps

    if you would consider a larger vessel Michalak's MayFly 16 would meet your skills level and carry your desired number of peeps

    it could also carry a family w/ 2 munchkins and camping gear for a weekend

    BON CHANCE

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,902

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Quote Originally Posted by swoody126 View Post
    MakoShark, when you spec'd 2-3 adults you virtually blew the <14' sailboat off your list
    This is the unavoidable inevitable truth of it in my experience.

    Another one:

    You may be fooling yourself that you can even find one or two adults to sail with you, or that you will be happy that you did find them, if you do. I've found that most people think "sailing" means you take them out for a ride in your boat, and they sit there and enjoy the ride, while you do all the sailing. Then they quickly discover:

    In boats of this size, "comfort" is a relative term. If there are seats at all--often it's best to sail small boats sitting on a cushion on the bottom of the boat--they will be low, and narrow. And there will be very little room aboard to stretch out and sit in comfort. The sail will be in the way, flopping and waving around and getting in their face at (for them) unexpected moments. If the rig has a boom, they'll be worrying about it hitting their head. Or worse, they'll be oblivious to the fact that there are times when it probably will hit them in the head if they are in the wrong place.

    They will also quickly discover that sailing can be hot. A bimini or sunshade on a small boat is an extreme rarity. Conversely, it can be very cold and windy. In Texas, it can be very very hot and very very windy, a combination that can really take a toll on people.

    They will also quickly discover that sailing in small boats is boring, unless you are at the tiller. (This isn't so bad if your crew will be experienced sailors, as in that case they can at least watch you at the tiller and think about--or TALK about--how much better they'd be doing it if they were at the tiller). On light-wind days there is not much happening. Conversely, on big-wind days, there is too much happening, and it will be very scary. And again, unless they are experienced sailors, everything the boat does will be scary and unpredictable and unconducive to comfort. They will be thinking "Is the boat supposed to lean that much? Is the sail supposed to do that? Why is the sail moving from this side to that side now?" and many many other things.

    They will get wet, and they won't like it. Because sailing in small boats is SLOW. Slow as in "that old lady on shore with her walker is going faster than we are" kind of slow. Which is too bad, because they will realize that this sailing business is going to go on a LOT longer than they had imagined when you invited them. And they won't like it. And they will have to go to the bathroom. And there are no bathrooms on small boats.

    They will sit in the wrong place, throwing off the boat's trim in a way that is utterly maddening to you, and they will be completely oblivious to it because they have no idea what a properly trimmed boat should feel like. They will be annoyed when you ask them to shift one way or another, and they do, and you tell them "No, that's too far" and they move back a bit and now it's too far the other way and you tell them and this gets repeated a few times and by then you are both annoyed.

    If your passengers are the type who want to try being at the tiller themselves, they will get everything wrong at first. And they won't know it. But you will. And it will be annoying.

    If you are not already a fairly experienced sailor, you will quickly find that those little things you aren't quite sure about what to do, or how to do it, or when, become MUCH more difficult with a passenger on board. And while you are trying to figure out the best way to do them without clobbering your passengers with the boom or capsizing the boat, your passengers will either be getting in the way or making things more difficult, or they will be scared because it will be obvious even to them that you aren't quite sure about these things, and they will begin to pepper you with fearful questions at exactly the wrong time. And those questions will increase your own uncertainties about your abilities. Just as meekness enrages bees, uncertainty angers the gods of the sea, and you and your passengers may invite a smiting.

    And by now your passengers are ready to be done sailing, and want to be back at the dock. Now. But you've just spent 45 minutes sailing and are now a half mile away from the dock (did I mention that sailing is slow), and because you started out with the downwind leg, or the wind shifted, or whatever, it will now be 2 hours before you are back at the ramp.

    By the time you do get back, you will find that you no longer need a boat that holds 2-3 adults.

    A far better plan, in my estimation, is to get your friends to build their own d@mn boats. Then you'll have people to sail with but you won't be stuck with being responsible for passengers who don't really like sailing anyway, at least not as passengers.

    The real truth is, being a passenger on a small boat is BORING. And if your friends are going to be more than passive freight, then they need their own boats anyway.

    Just one opinion. But an opinion based on (at this point) a fair number of miles sailing. Mostly alone. (I wonder why that is?)

    Best of luck!

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    825

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    How bad is, really, getting a boat registered? Sub 14' and passengers is quite intimate.
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
    ♦ The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it
    ♦ If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear
    ♦ George Orwell

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    28,822

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilMB View Post
    Texas, plywood, shallow, sub-14’, how about the Welsford Saturday Night Special which was literally designed for tat scenario: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-Special-quot, https://duckworks.com/saturday-night...tant-download/

    Lug rig, easy building, safe, dry, takes plenty of weight. What’s not to love? (Okay, it’s not as salty looking as a Morbic or an Ilur, but it’s a f’real boaty boat.)
    That's the boat I thought of as well, because it was designed to evade the very Texas regulations you mentioned. I think there are also plans for a lug yawl for this one.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,902

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    The Saturday Night Special is a great boat, but it does have a large centerboard case, and no seats. Two adults on board I think would be pretty comfortable. More than that would quickly feel crowded. I think that's true of almost every boat at this size.

    Being able to fit people in is one thing. Having enough room to be able to move freely (as sailing small boats sometimes requires), or to be comfortable, is something entirely different.

    It's not as simple as looking at a plan to see if there are enough "seats" for that many people. It's being able to envision how habitable that space will really be in actual sailing conditions. I think that's something that's very clear to those of us with small boat experience, but can be very hard to believe if looking at plans is all you've had the chance to do.

    I don't think 3 adults in comfort is achievable in a 14' boat, with the possible exception of a catboat. Maybe a Bolger Bobcat stretched to 14' would do it? Then again, Jean Alden (a modified Bobcat stretched to 14') appears on several of the WBG west coast threads, and it doesn't look like it would be comfortable for 3 adults, either.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Auckland New Zealand
    Posts
    255

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    The relative ease of build for the Morbic 12 was a big factor in driving my choice.
    I purchased from Francois the CNC cutting files along with the build instructions I then delivered 8 sheets of marine plywood and 4 sheets of MDF to a local company who did a sterling job with the CNC work and I now have in my workspace a rather large Airfix styled flat pack boat.
    Included in the cutting file pack was a building spine and moulds also handily a cradle to sit her in once upright hence the MDF.
    We sold our cruising yacht a few moons ago and my wife had a series of complex operations with a long period of recuperation attached so we relocated to a lifestyle block with a view of the upper reaches of the local harbour.
    I wanted a smallish light and therefore manageable craft that I can row motor and sail locally but also with an eye to traversing the many available waterways that are on offer here in Aotearoa.
    Verviers Morbic design has its roots as a utilitarian working boat and my efforts will be along those lines too.
    As to the size we are a couple and 3 up in my opinion would really not really be that practicable unless you have a family history stacked with Leprecians.
    3B7FFF71-E6AC-4F5E-9C32-1B840E6E0DE2.jpgDFBFAAEF-3765-412F-A6E2-C8E9E6C9AAED.jpg
    Last edited by Priscilla; 11-19-2022 at 03:01 AM.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Padanaram, MA USA
    Posts
    10,365

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    I’d look hard at Doug Hylan’s Oonagh

    oonagh_sail1.jpg

    There are some very good how-to-build videos on Off Center Harbor.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,714

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Just for comparison in volume between the Morbic 12 and the Ilur, assuming that a conversation with your game warden isn’t going to be a dealbreaker, here are some photos of Waxwing under sail with two aboard:
    9618E551-EB5D-46B2-A7EF-8FE9DF5403AC.jpg

    and Morbic, 2 up:
    BFCF78A3-16BE-466B-A5AD-11F6E29FBF50.jpg
    and the Ilur, with 4 adults—
    4CC7653D-4047-4C67-BE0D-B88B48684ED5.jpg
    the boat is carrying the weight without difficulty, and sailing well. Moving around with this many aboard requires careful choreography, and Tom’s comments about crew awareness of shifting weights are spot on.
    For what it’s worth, when I built the Jewell, registration required an inspection by a state official before she was assigned a hull ID number. The official was very pleasant, and actually excited to give a home made wooden sailing vessel a looking over. Other than scheduling the visit during a pandemic it was not an odious process. If a bigger boat suits your needs, don’t be put off by the bureaucracy. There are so many excellent designs available for home builders these days.
    One other thought— I think you are right to look for a boat with a rig that will be easy to manage; as your children grow, it will be great fun to get them started in sailing, and a rig that young ones can easily handle, on a well sorted design that is pleasant and straightforward to sail will give your family years of fun, stories, and adventure.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,902

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    John,

    your Ilur always reminds me how little length has to do with the usable size (volume) of a boat. Your 14' boat is far roomier than my 18' boat, which is ideal for a solo sailor, good with 2, and OK with 3 if one of them parks up in the bow seat and doesn't move (that's actually pretty comfy--I often sit there when I'm letting someone else handle the sailing duties).

    Watching Roger Barnes's videos, too, you can see just how stable Ilur is. My Alaska would not tolerate all the standing up and walking around Roger does.

    I used to look at boat plans all the time and think that just because there was room for people to sit, there would be room to go sailing with them. And yes, I've even sailed with 4 people aboard a 12' Bolger Cartopper. But I have revised my opinions about how many people I can have on board and still have it be fun for everyone.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    Cason, Tx, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    To all saying the 14 ft boat for 3 adults isn't practical. True. However, maybe I should clarify: I want a boat that I can sail with one passenger (my wife, the very definition of a passive -and patient- sailor) and take a friend out in in order to "teach them the ropes" of sailing. I have quite a few who are interested, but don't know the first thing about sailing. I didn't quite mean full time three man sailing. My family runs to small, anyway (145 lbs average and short).


    Also, for the difficulty of build... I could quite comfortably build a steam-bent frame, traditionally lofted boat from a sketch in the back of an old sailing magazine. However, that's not exactly a recipe for getting on the water quick with no'but 30 minute evenings and weekends packed with house, car, and farm work. (I need fewer projects...eh, well, that ain't happening) It also explains why I want to avoid registering it; I'd hate to build a boat of any cost range and find out at the last second that the local game warden spilled his coffee down his front after getting notified of a pay cut. I may build Ilur and risk this anyway, though; she's exactly the sort of thing I was looking for, if a bit over my stated length.

    John, I'm glad to hear your inspection went well. It makes me feel a bit better about the prospect. I need to call up our TPWD and ask them more about the process. Perhaps I'm just being paranoid.

    I love catboats of pretty much any description. Had I the time and money, I'd build a "Woods Hole Spritsail Boat" as shown in Small Boats Monthly. Not "technically" a catboat, but close enough for my loose definitions. I'd love to have a true, traditional Cape Cod style catboat of about 18ft, but that's a dream for another day.

    Edit: Four people... in a Cartopper... I began building one of these (lack of time with new job and Texas weather conspired to ruin her before I could epoxy coat). As a result, I know of what I speak when I say... you're a brave man, sir. O.o
    Last edited by MakoShark; 11-19-2022 at 08:38 AM.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wrocław, Poland
    Posts
    13,902

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Quote Originally Posted by MakoShark View Post
    Edit: Four people... in a Cartopper... I began building one of these (lack of time with new job and Texas weather conspired to ruin her before I could epoxy coat). As a result, I know of what I speak when I say... you're a brave man, sir. O.o
    I only did it once...

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    83,757

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    I'll join those who question pairing the short oa length and the # of crew you specify.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,714

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Just to be clear, I was in no way endorsing routinely sailing with 4 adults on a boat the size of an Ilur. It can be done, and has, but is not optimal in any way. She is a pleasure to single hand, and two is dandy, assuming that the crew has some small boat sense.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Charleston, SC USA
    Posts
    248

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    quoting Wi-Tom

    A far better plan, in my estimation, is to get your friends to build their own d@mn boats. Then you'll have people to sail with but you won't be stuck with being responsible for passengers who don't really like sailing anyway, at least not as passengers.

    The real truth is, being a passenger on a small boat is BORING. And if your friends are going to be more than passive freight, then they need their own boats anyway.

    I’ll second Wi-Tom.
    That’s why I end up using my kayak more than my sailboat. It’s more social and everybody has their own boat! A fleet of dinghy sailors out sailing together though is a blast! Eat food, drink beer and talk about the misadventures of the day back at the club afterwords. And everybody has their own boat!

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    dfw
    Posts
    1,573

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    i might suggest a personal visit(not just a phone call) to the TP&W office and asking the clerk what actually is expected and picking up 2 sets of documents needed(you might just flub 1 up)

    easy peasy ... if you have your ducks al in a row

    btw ... listen to WI-Tom ... he has a clue

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Auckland New Zealand
    Posts
    255

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    and Morbic, 2 up:
    BFCF78A3-16BE-466B-A5AD-11F6E29FBF50.jpg
    I see 3 aboard.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,714

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    You are absolutely correct! My anthropocentric bad. We are bringing a non human crew aboard Umami on occasion. Like human children, if they get started early, they take new routines in stride:
    C26482A1-89F2-4D43-9CD7-B157CF4CB250.jpg
    Apologies for the thread drift.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Metro West, MA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario


  34. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    25,145

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    Paul Gartside's 14' pram, Design #222. You could add fore and aft decks and he'd design a sailing rig for you. He's very helpful. https://store.gartsideboats.com/prod...ram-design-222
    "Be curious, not judgmental." - (Misattributed to Walt Whitman as recalled by) Ted Lasso

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    585

    Default Re: Best Boat... For This Specific Scenario

    https://www.selway-fisher.com/GPDinghyover13.htm

    You said you looked though Selway-Fisher. A number of good 14' options in there, shave 1" if you want to be safe from the State. The Goshawk-14 and Highlander-14 look good. Add side decks if you want.

    Where is Cason, TX?

    Goshawk14d1.jpg

    Highlander 141 d1.jpg
    Last edited by Matt young; 11-20-2022 at 05:08 PM.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
    -The Dude-

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •