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Thread: How do we feel about restomods?

  1. #1
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    Default How do we feel about restomods?

    Motoring heritage ruined, or a valid way to breath new life into interesting cars that would otherwise be undesirable to regularly drive, whether it be on road or track?

    A few examples







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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    I don’t have a problem with them, (especially since I had an Alfa GTV like that, and would love to have one again in good running order). Also, the subject comes up with my boat. It’s a 1943 fishing boat. It sorta still looks similar but as a cruising boat it now has a form that is more appropriate to its new function.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    I have no problem with the concept, and sometimes great admiration for the execution. Devil's in the details, eh?
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    What's been modded about these cars?
    Only because I’m familiar with the GTV; it has a roll cage, no front bumper, the wheel wells have been flared, and it has four lug bolt wheels, pretty sure mine had five. No clue what’s under the hood.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Usually the concept involves updating the running gear to modern suspension and brakes as a bare minimum.

    The interior is worked on to bring it up to modern expectations of comfort - better seats with head restraints, modern infotainment systems and covering all the bare metal panels with some sort of interior material.

    Engine wise, there's a real mix - just blueprint and rebuild, period correct upgrades to power based on the original block or a period-correct replacement, to outright over-powering with a modern engine. The worst examples are Euro or Japanese cars that have been LS-swapped.

    Body work modifications should be done properly in steel (or whatever material is appropriate for the rest of the shell) and usually involves making provision for bigger, wider wheels. Rivet-on plastic body kits are not the idea.

    I think that Alfa is an all-carbon-bodied track tool. The Stratos has extensive bodywork mods and is powered by a modern Alfa V6 with a supercharger. Here's the story on the Ferrari 288 - https://www.carscoops.com/2022/09/gr...rrari-288-gto/

    And the Jags are to troll JohnB.
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    I wanted an updated Custom Cruiser station wagon with a modern 2.5 cylinder turbo diesel.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    I wanted an updated Custom Cruiser station wagon with a modern 2.5 cylinder turbo diesel.
    I'm surprised, I thought you'd want the same but with a full electric drivetrain.

    And that's another interesting angle to this game - repowering classics with electric powertrains from crash-damaged EVs. There's a Youtube channel for Classic Electric Cars - a company in Wales that does it with a 'no irreversible changes' ethos, everything is bolt on so as not to upset the die-hard petrol-heads any more than necessary.
    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    a modern 2.5 cylinder turbo diesel.
    How does that 1/2 cylinder work?

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Usually the concept involves updating the running gear to modern suspension and brakes as a bare minimum.

    The interior is worked on to bring it up to modern expectations of comfort - better seats with head restraints, modern infotainment systems and covering all the bare metal panels with some sort of interior material.

    Engine wise, there's a real mix - just blueprint and rebuild, period correct upgrades to power based on the original block or a period-correct replacement, to outright over-powering with a modern engine. The worst examples are Euro or Japanese cars that have been LS-swapped.

    Body work modifications should be done properly in steel (or whatever material is appropriate for the rest of the shell) and usually involves making provision for bigger, wider wheels. Rivet-on plastic body kits are not the idea.

    I think that Alfa is an all-carbon-bodied track tool. The Stratos has extensive bodywork mods and is powered by a modern Alfa V6 with a supercharger. Here's the story on the Ferrari 288 - https://www.carscoops.com/2022/09/gr...rrari-288-gto/

    And the Jags are to troll JohnB.
    I've met a couple of people who put American inline 6 engines in Jaguars, I suppose as an economy measure (breakdowns are expensive.) I'm sure most of these restomods would retain their value better if kept original. when you get down to it, I suppose a restomod is really just a classy hotrod. How do they differ from a restorod?

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    I'm not familiar with restorods, I think there more a North American thing. Restomods were initially defined as restored classics modified for usability and safety, with performance as a secondary concern.

    The examples I posted though, are at the richer end of the scale, whether it be a well-funded designer or a wealthy owner being unconstrained by the economics of what can be achieved.
    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    I’m generally not a fan, but to some extent it depends on the car and the degree and scope of the modifications. I certainly wouldn’t think twice about upgrading an early VW Bug with disc brakes and upgrading the engine for a little more power, but I wouldn’t even consider swapping a Subaru engine for a type l powerplant. I also wouldn’t have any interest in putting a V8 engine in a Corvair.

    I also wouldn’t consider restomoding a 1950’s era Corvette, but I might buy one of the 1950’s Corvette bodies that are being manufactured now and build a faux-1957 Corvette with modern components. In reality, I’ll never have the money.

    One thing I might do is upgrade a Model A with one of the recently developed replacement engines that are being made. I’d keep the original Model A engine around if I ever sold the car. These replacement engines are new block castings that are stronger, and pressure lubricated, and much more durable and reliable for a car that would be driven frequently, while keeping much of the character of the original engine.


    Jeff C
    Last edited by leikec; 11-16-2022 at 07:23 PM.
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    An important virtue of my Karmann Ghia is that it needn't be kept original... I'm free to muck it up as I please.

    There are some cars which are remarkably original... "survivors" and I enthusiastically support keeping those in original condition.
    There are those who wish to restore an oldie to near-to-original-as-possible condition, and I admire their work. Its not for me, but I absolutely respect the energy and the craft that goes into such an endeavor.

    Unless it's somehow historically significant or the last of it's kind, I say do whatever lets you drive and enjoy it the most.
    "Visionary" is he who in every egg sees a carbonara.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post

    Unless it's somehow historically significant or the last of it's kind, I say do whatever lets you drive and enjoy it the most.
    There was a 1938 Locomobile on Craigslist in Michigan recently, and it was a running, driving car offered at a very fair price. It’s a better than even guess that the eventual buyer planned to “restomod” it, which seems a shame to me. But when someone buys a car they can do whatever they want, regardless of my feelings…

    Jeff C
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    An important virtue of my Karmann Ghia is that it needn't be kept original... I'm free to muck it up as I please.

    There are some cars which are remarkably original... "survivors" and I enthusiastically support keeping those in original condition.
    There are those who wish to restore an oldie to near-to-original-as-possible condition, and I admire their work. Its not for me, but I absolutely respect the energy and the craft that goes into such an endeavor.

    Unless it's somehow historically significant or the last of it's kind, I say do whatever lets you drive and enjoy it the most.
    Exactly.
    It also drives up the value of the remaining original vehicles.
    R
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy W View Post
    How does that 1/2 cylinder work?
    oh damn, I thought I was firing on all cylinders today.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Most restomods seem to be running around on rubber bands for tyres, lowered so low they end up pussy footing around unless they're on the best of roads.
    I don't mind repowers and the like , transmissions etc if its still a drivers car.... and Jags have always had v8 transplants. They're usually referred to by Jag club guys as having Lumps in them, or they are a Lump.
    Big thing now is electric repowers of course, kind of crazy in a Ferrari or E type where a significant part of its value is in the drivetrain, but hey ..its being done.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    I agree about the inappropriate wheels. Somme of the classic styling just looks wrong on big rims and low profile tyres. I an understand going that way on a track car where the lack of comfort and style is trumped by the lack of sidewall flex, but on a road-going car, it seems to lose the essence of the classic.
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    that would be fun

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Most restomods seem to be running around on rubber bands for tyres, lowered so low they end up pussy footing around unless they're on the best of roads.
    I don't mind repowers and the like , transmissions etc if its still a drivers car.... and Jags have always had v8 transplants. They're usually referred to by Jag club guys as having Lumps in them, or they are a Lump.
    Big thing now is electric repowers of course, kind of crazy in a Ferrari or E type where a significant part of its value is in the drivetrain, but hey ..its being done.
    as much as i admire small block chevy's
    i would go the other direction and search out one of these for a roadster build
    in my not humble opinion the most beautiful motor built in large series production
    cheap too, reliable with an msd ignition and webers. . .
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Anyways, this was all just the leadup to a dad-brag.

    My son is currently in the UK, probably for a couple of years, but we'll see.

    His brief job history so far includes a Saturday job at a panel beaters, school experience and a bit of full-time work at a classic car workshop (ended when the owner retired) and stints at 3 different fabrication jobs, ranging from architectural to food-grade stainless.

    He'd been following one of the restomod workshops on Youtube for a while, they'd been building a Mk 1 Ford Escort to the demanding specifications of Gordon Murray, F1 car designer (as in race cars, but also the McLaren F1). Then he realised that said restomod outfit is in our old hometown, where he and his partner are currently staying with my mum. So he sent them a CV on the off-chance, which led to an interview, then a trial day, and this week he properly started work at what he described prior to leaving as his dream job.

    I got a message this morning saying that he was about to get introduced on their weekly workshop tour video, but managed to duck away from the camera just in time. They'll get to him eventually, in which case I'll post a link.
    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Anyways, this was all just the leadup to a dad-brag.

    My son is currently in the UK, probably for a couple of years, but we'll see.

    His brief job history so far includes a Saturday job at a panel beaters, school experience and a bit of full-time work at a classic car workshop (ended when the owner retired) and stints at 3 different fabrication jobs, ranging from architectural to food-grade stainless.

    He'd been following one of the restomod workshops on Youtube for a while, they'd been building a Mk 1 Ford Escort to the demanding specifications of Gordon Murray, F1 car designer (as in race cars, but also the McLaren F1). Then he realised that said restomod outfit is in our old hometown, where he and his partner are currently staying with my mum. So he sent them a CV on the off-chance, which led to an interview, then a trial day, and this week he properly started work at what he described prior to leaving as his dream job.

    I got a message this morning saying that he was about to get introduced on their weekly workshop tour video, but managed to duck away from the camera just in time. They'll get to him eventually, in which case I'll post a link.
    bomb post
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    as much as i admire small block chevy's
    i would go the other direction and search out one of these for a roadster build
    in my not humble opinion the most beautiful motor built in large series production
    cheap too, reliable with an msd ignition and webers. . .
    33FC362E-33B5-48D6-8288-00099571E8BC.jpg
    Might go well in a Morgan, eh?

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Anyways, this was all just the leadup to a dad-brag.

    My son is currently in the UK, probably for a couple of years, but we'll see.

    His brief job history so far includes a Saturday job at a panel beaters, school experience and a bit of full-time work at a classic car workshop (ended when the owner retired) and stints at 3 different fabrication jobs, ranging from architectural to food-grade stainless.

    He'd been following one of the restomod workshops on Youtube for a while, they'd been building a Mk 1 Ford Escort to the demanding specifications of Gordon Murray, F1 car designer (as in race cars, but also the McLaren F1). Then he realised that said restomod outfit is in our old hometown, where he and his partner are currently staying with my mum. So he sent them a CV on the off-chance, which led to an interview, then a trial day, and this week he properly started work at what he described prior to leaving as his dream job.

    I got a message this morning saying that he was about to get introduced on their weekly workshop tour video, but managed to duck away from the camera just in time. They'll get to him eventually, in which case I'll post a link.
    How cool is that. A long way from Beach haven.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    And one more thing
    I got the pink slip daddy
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    Anyways, this was all just the leadup to a dad-brag.

    My son is currently in the UK, probably for a couple of years, but we'll see.

    His brief job history so far includes a Saturday job at a panel beaters, school experience and a bit of full-time work at a classic car workshop (ended when the owner retired) and stints at 3 different fabrication jobs, ranging from architectural to food-grade stainless.

    He'd been following one of the restomod workshops on Youtube for a while, they'd been building a Mk 1 Ford Escort to the demanding specifications of Gordon Murray, F1 car designer (as in race cars, but also the McLaren F1). Then he realised that said restomod outfit is in our old hometown, where he and his partner are currently staying with my mum. So he sent them a CV on the off-chance, which led to an interview, then a trial day, and this week he properly started work at what he described prior to leaving as his dream job.

    I got a message this morning saying that he was about to get introduced on their weekly workshop tour video, but managed to duck away from the camera just in time. They'll get to him eventually, in which case I'll post a link.
    Awesome dad-brag, Congrats to all of you!

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    I also wouldn’t consider restomoding a 1950’s era Corvette, but I might buy one of the 1950’s Corvette bodies that are being manufactured now and build a faux-1957 Corvette with modern components.
    Exactly. Or what I did, a 1963 e-type that had been seriously damaged - I just banged it out on the cheap and made it what I wanted. Since it was never going to be worth doing a real restoration on, that seemed okay to do. I wouldn't want to see that happen to a pristine example.

    One thing I might do is upgrade a Model A with one of the recently developed replacement engines that are being made. I’d keep the original Model A engine around if I ever sold the car. These replacement engines are new block castings that are stronger, and pressure lubricated, and much more durable and reliable for a car that would be driven frequently, while keeping much of the character of the original engine.
    They are almost exactly the same, except for the mains and rod bearings. However I just got through measuring three of those blocks with a friend who does model t stuff and they were not within spec. Checked with another guy who does these, out of several he came up with a few with newer serial numbers which had crank bearing bores of the correct size. Answer from the seller was not encouraging, "They have to be right, they were done from a solidworks model and made on cnc machines". That was Fail Number One, fail two was "I talked to the federal-mogul tech engineer and he said they should be okay as long as they aren't overstressed." I can just see us seliing these in new engines and telling the customer "Well, they should be okay, as long as you don't drive it too hard or too much". Yeah right. That's why they bought new blocks.

    I'd have been more circumspect about these except that those answers were not responsible or realistic. Buying brand new blocks which you have to line bore is less than ideal. They also were not cheap.

    The rods were all okay.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    To me, it depends upon the value, originality, and condition of the original car. I'm currently building a '72 F-250. Not particularly rare, and it was pretty much used up and shot when I started on it. I'm going 'retro'; step-side bed, no chrome trim, 6 cylinder engine, and stock wheels and tires. I don't car for pick-ups that have been slammed or jacked. They don't make repro 8' step-side beds, so I fabricated one, and actually found a set of the ultra-rare side steps in good shape. The original grille was shot, so I found an older style white painted steel grille off of a '68. I'm going for the old farm truck look.

    On the other hand, my '92 Miata is a rare model, one of only 1500 made. It's in very good original shape, and to me it would be a crime to hack it up.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Formally requesting a thread on that pickup project!
    "Visionary" is he who in every egg sees a carbonara.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    ^ for sure.. on that 6cyl, Ford's inline? or one of the v's? it is restoMod, eh?

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by MushCreek View Post

    On the other hand, my '92 Miata is a rare model, one of only 1500 made. It's in very good original shape, and to me it would be a crime to hack it up.
    I feel the same way about my Miata. I'm guessing Sunburst Yellow, right? Mine is an automatic which really works just fine for me.


    This landed at the abomination end of the scale for me

    My '68 Bronco is a very light restomod, mostly to make it less of a beast to drive. I stopped at power front disc brakes and a floor shift conversion. If I was planning on keeping it much longer I'd go with fuel injection, new suspension and power steering but that'll be for the next owner.
    Steve

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Big thing now is electric repowers of course, kind of crazy in a Ferrari or E type where a significant part of its value is in the drivetrain, but hey ..its being done.


    These folks have been working on electric conversions, their selling point is that you don't have modify the car. Everything bolts in so if you want to go back to ICE you can.
    Steve

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogKid View Post
    I'm surprised, I thought you'd want the same but with a full electric drivetrain.

    And that's another interesting angle to this game - repowering classics with electric powertrains from crash-damaged EVs. There's a Youtube channel for Classic Electric Cars - a company in Wales that does it with a 'no irreversible changes' ethos, everything is bolt on so as not to upset the die-hard petrol-heads any more than necessary.
    I like the power curve, vibration and sound.

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    Default Re: How do we feel about restomods?

    There are a number of older classic vehicles where I live. They look really cool but I'd like them a lot more if they were modified to not emit oily/gassy stink as they drive by.

    Jeff

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