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Thread: Noank Pulling Boat

  1. #1
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    Default Noank Pulling Boat

    Hello,
    I'm planning to build Nick Schade's Noank Pulling Boat and was wondering if anyone has built this boat? Is it only suitable for a rowing unit or could I install a bench? And is it possible to install an aft bench for an occasional passenger?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Dutch - this sort of question is good but best addressed to the designer.
    I imagine it can be set up for fixed seat but you will need to out-rig the oars somehow - there is not much gunwale width there for a decent oar length.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch Harry View Post
    Hello,
    I'm planning to build Nick Schade's Noank Pulling Boat and was wondering if anyone has built this boat? Is it only suitable for a rowing unit or could I install a bench? And is it possible to install an aft bench for an occasional passenger?
    From the CLC website: "The Noank Pulling Boat doesn't have the volume for a second rower or passenger, but a single crew could pack quite a lot of camping gear into the watertight compartments at the bow and stern."

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Thanks for the response. I'm a newby at boatbuilding, so I will contact the designer before making any adjustments. About the passenger: in the manual, Nick Schade mentions making extra holes in the centre rail to be able to adjust the position of the rowing rig depending on how the boat is loaded. He also mentions making a passenger seat that can be mounted on the aft end of the rail. That's why I'm interested in the (building and rowing) experiences of anyone who has built this boat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    On a skinny 'recreational performance' rower you'll need to make doubly sure you have the boat balanced longitudinally and have spare design displacement capacity. Immersing one end, besides distortion to waterline shape and freeboard, immersing the keel more will also make it hard to turn.

    If you mean "a non rowing passenger facing forward' you need to be looking at Thames Skiffs. That's what they were designed for. Oughtred has some for glued construction that will work well.

    This one at 19ft will have a decent enough waterline, and gives you a central rowing position solo and a forward one to offset when a passenger is sat aft facing forward. Or two can row and one passenger sits facing forward and steers the boat with lines to the rudder. The forward station has a slightly narrower interoarlock distance but you get the correct balance. A relatively 'high transom' prevents any chance of transom immersion at higher displacement loadings for the same reasons as a Whitehall.



    This is an Oughtred Badger:








    "She rows like a dream, even with Rhea and Ken sitting together in the caned back seat arm in arm enjoying the afternoon with a glass of Champagne".

    https://woodonwaterblog.wordpress.co...s-river-skiff/
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 11-03-2022 at 05:39 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Wow, that's a beauty. However, it's a bit too big for my workshop and a bit too heavy for my cartop i think. I'd rather settle for ougthreds Mole-design, the Badgers little sister. Point is, I want to build it strip-planked, and most of the time, I'll be sitting alone in the boat (though perhaps the dog would like to accompany me). btw, nice roomy workshop you got.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Not my shed or boat unfortunately. I had shed envy too!

    If you're set on strip plank, also look through Paul Gartside's rowing catalogue. He has a few for strip plank. He avoids the cost of a rigger, and he reckons 3-4mm tortured ply is a bit lighter, but I can understand the attraction to strip construction.

    It would appear this one is ribbed and that was probably to avoid glass. That would be up to you.

    No.94



    With a shorter boat, you'll be closer to the bow with an unpaying passenger, and have a narrower inter oarlock distance plus the sheer line rise will put your oarlock higher when it wants to be lower - leading to windmilling compared to a longer boat. That's something to consider. With one person I'd be looking for 16-18ft waterline, two people you really will get a better glide with at 20ft'ish.

    No.179. Paul uses a two position mid ship thwart to give a middle rowing position or rear seat on alot of his boats.



    Check Bob No. 115, and 242 out too, they're strip plank. Quite a few have been published in Watercraft magazine over the years. His Light Rowing Skiff was in last months. I think you can build from them or give the discounted plans fee (about $60 or so for that month or two he has them on offer when they are published so you can print them out big and ask a question or two if you've paid him.



    https://store.gartsideboats.com/coll...d-a-pedal-boat

    Speed will be conferred much by length waterline unto 20ft and how narrow the waterline beam is. Narrow beam though means tipsy wipsy. In bigger waves and wind double ended is better and having more keel rocker and not having a deep immersed forefoot and symmetrical windage. Low midship freeboard means less lifting and dropping of the oars (more efficient) and ideally 5'2"- 5'4" inter oarlock beam depending on your height - is where alot of performance rowers and sail and oar boat are evolutionary converged on. Light accelerates faster and goes faster. Heavy is less easily stopped. If you want to hold a fast top speed you want a higher prismatic coefficient than you get with sinusoidal waterlines. If you want fast, Clint Chase's Drake Race is your boat and the only one designed properly for that, but you'll have to start up the jigsaw - it's clinker ply as drawn. As a new builder I wouldn't change build method shown on plans until you know what you're doing.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 11-04-2022 at 10:25 AM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch Harry View Post
    Wow, that's a beauty. However, it's a bit too big for my workshop and a bit too heavy for my cartop i think. I'd rather settle for ougthreds Mole-design, the Badgers little sister. Point is, I want to build it strip-planked, and most of the time, I'll be sitting alone in the boat (though perhaps the dog would like to accompany me). btw, nice roomy workshop you got.
    I don't see why it can't be done. As a reference, a Mardarin 15' rowing skiff by Paul Fisher has been built in strip plank and was covered in an past issue of Watercraft. Try this link and scroll down to the photos https://www.selway-fisher.com/Rowskiffs.htm#DARIN

    Nick

    PS Edited to add:- It's Watercraft issue 122 March / April 2017 pages 45 - 50.
    Last edited by NickW; 11-04-2022 at 03:53 PM. Reason: Add Issue number

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Another alternative would be building a strip planked Adirondack Guideboat. Hard to get lighter or faster. Michine's book Building an Adirondack Guideboat has the details.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  10. #10

    Default Re: Noank Pulling Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Another alternative would be building a strip planked Adirondack Guideboat. Hard to get lighter or faster. Michine's book Building an Adirondack Guideboat has the details.
    Nick Schade also has a guideboat plan, I built one in 8mm paulownia and it came out around 25kg, with a bit more thought and care I think around 20kg would be possible.

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