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Thread: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    The boats in #15 are from the Regenboog class ( Rainbow class) one of the oldest one design classes in the Dutch sailing world. They are still raced today and are very powerful boats.
    The lake is indeed the Brasemermeer.
    I will add additional info about the boat later.
    This is the Rainbow that was donated to our King, of course in the color orange, he still owns the boat and races it now and then.
    Attachment 122593
    Any guesses why the Friesian foresail?
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Ron,

    the main battle every sailing year for the Rainbow class is the battle between Holland ( the western part of the Netherlands) and Friesland ( the province of Friesland in the north of the Netherlands). During that battle ( several matches on different locations) they use these sails, this is a small reference to this event. I don't know what the main battle is in Canadian sports ( probably hockey), but you can compare the importance of those (hockey) matches with this Holland-Friesland competition for these sailors ( there usually is some damage to the boats)

    A clip:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_as2Vnqu0uw
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-03-2022 at 05:25 AM.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Today's photo has 7 boats, to my count. We are in a canal again, but the size of some of the boats, and the sails and nets, says these boats are for larger waters. And we've got very visible leeboards!

    The caption is "De tol aan de reinheid (Spakenburg). The caption is not helpful, as it refers to the laundry, not the ships ("the toll on cleanliness").
    This is a small village on the river Nijkerkernauw, which does lead to several large lakes/estuaries and then to the ocean.
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  4. #39
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    That's a nice picture I've got a lot of information later today ( I'm busy now). The boat BU155 still exist, more on her later today.
    To keep you calm the picture of the oldest (1750) working shipyard in the Netherlands located, you guessed it probably, in Spakenburg . It's hidden somewhere behind the boy, the cyclist, the towels and the sheets on the OP.
    botterwerf.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-03-2022 at 08:29 AM.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Part 1

    First the title, if you take a good look you can see the little girl has some kind of old fashioned toy on the street in front of her. Such a spinning toy is called a "tol" in Dutch and is kept spinning with a little stick and some rope in a wip like configuration and movements. If you look closely you can see that she has just completed one whip like movement with her right arm.
    A pic of some "tollen".
    tollen.jpg
    The town of Spakenburg is situated at the outmost southern tip of the former inshore see called "Zuiderzee" renamed IJsselmeer after it was closed off from the Northsea with a long jetty called "Afsluitdijk" in 1934. This killed all the saltwater fish and nearly killed all fishing activities in the old fishing villages along the shores. Some of the fishing people switched to fresh water fishing but in the early 60's a large part of the IJsselmeer was changed into a polder ( new land ) from that time on there was just a small stretch of water outside of Spakenburg harbor. The inshore fishing stoped almost completely and most men switched to high sea fishing form ports in the western parts of the Netherlands.
    In the 30's until the late 50's there was much poverty in these villages, the picture was taken at the start of better times.

    Spakenburg now, the OP was taken approximately 50 meters behind the curve in the quay on the right, on the left the shipyard from #39.
    spakenburg 2015.jpg

    A picture of the IJsselmeer now.
    IJSselmeer.jpg
    The top is North, Spakenburg is situated in the little circle at the bottom end. A you can see there's a large polder just North of the harbor entrance now.
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-03-2022 at 01:56 PM.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Part 2.

    The main part of the boats in the harbor of Spakenburg are "Botters" flat bottomed ships of approximately 11 meters LOA a beam of approximately 4 meters and a draft < 1 meter, they were equipped with large leeboards.
    These boats were specifically designed for fishing on the very shallow Zuiderzee/IJsselmeer, the average dept of the sea/lake was 2-3 meters, but it was much shallower along the shores, especially along the southern shore. Despite the shallowness the waves on this inshore sea can be rather annoying, they tend to have a higher frequency and are steeper than normal waves on a deeper sea
    Most of the boats you see on the picture in #40 are botters.
    A picture of a Botter with all of her working sails hoisted.
    Bottermetaap.jpeg
    The BU 155 (BU is the fishing indication of Bunschoten/Spakenburg) is a boat of another type, she is a so called "Pluut", she is also flat bottomed, has leeboards but is a bit smaller than a botter.
    She has a more pointy stem and her draft is much smaller, usually approximately 50-60 cm. They were designed for fishing along the southern and very shallow shoreline of the Zuiderzee/IJsselmeer.
    The BU 155 was bought by a Dutch fighter pilot around 1959 or 1960, just a few years after the original picture was taken. He worked as a testpilot of the F104 ( Starfighter, nicknamed the Widowmaker in Europe) for the Fokker company in Amsterdam. I'm sure he wanted a boat to get some peace of mind
    He ordered a Friesian shipyard to completely rebuilt the battered "Pluut". He even ordered a little cabin to create some comfort on the normally open boat. Almost every piece of wood was new after the rebuilt.
    1962 jaap na herbouw.jpg
    This is a picture on the Friesian shipyard, just outside the building shed after the rebuilt in 1962. You can see the cabin entrance, according to the history he named the boat "Jaap" ( a mans name) on the picture it seems more like "LANO" but I'm not sure.
    In sideview.
    te water jaap 62.jpg
    After this owner there's not much known about the little ship, but she has had another rebuilt because this is the BU155 in 2000. The cabin is gone and she is configured as a fishing vessel again. So 65 years later little BU155 is still sailing in Dutch waters.
    jaap 2000.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-03-2022 at 02:17 PM.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Thanks!

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Here is another fishing boat. No leeboards that I can see. It looks like a free standing mast with a lug sail, thokugh the sails are down to let the net dry out in the wind. The caption is "Enkhuizen is een prachtige stad", which means "Enkhuizen is a beautiful city." Enbkhuizen is north of Amsterdam, on a peninsula that juts out into the Zuiderzee/Ijsselmeer. Per Dutchpp's post above, this was open to the sea but closed off to become a freshwater lake in 1934.
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    The easy part is the Enkhuizen part, that was another fishing village along the western shore of the IJsselmeer. During the 50's a poor town. The large building next to the open bridge is called "Drommedaris" (Dromedary). It was built in 1540 as the southern entrance gate to Enkhuizen, it's a cultural centre now, visible just left of the centre on the underside of this picture. A fisherman still lives in the place where the original picture was taken.
    enkhuizen.jpg

    The name of the ship is the "Attie Trijntje" which is by close inspection just visible underneath the tiller. The boat was built in 1948 in Schoorldam at the Bakker&Kuijper shipyard, which was specialized in steel ships. Unfortunately I can't find the records of the shipyard to get more specifics.
    On the fishery registration the boat is categorized as a motor cutter ( motor kotter), which suggests that the sails were for support only, that's probably why there are no leeboards visible. The boat was sold to another fisherman in 1959 and went on as EH 13, I couldn't find a single picture of EH 23 or EH 13 (only later boats, they reused the fishing numbers). I'm very curious about the shape of the bow.
    Next time when I'm in Enkhuizen I will take a little walk along the harbors and try to find this boat or a similar one, I think some of them must have survived.
    If I find her I will publish it here of course.

    The fishery registration forms.
    EH23 foto 1.jpg
    EH 23 foto 2.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-04-2022 at 10:39 AM.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    We had to do some shopping and we did it in Enkhuizen.
    There's no trace of the boat in all the ports and marinas of Enkhuizen.
    Two pictures of the quay in the OP.
    The first one from almost the same spot ( the exact spot is private property and the quay is changed slightly)
    IMG_1421.jpg
    And the second one from the opposite direction.
    IMG_1422.jpg

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    next weekend there will be the Traditionele Schepen Beurs in Den Helder. 11, 12 and 13 november. This started some years ago as a boatshow where sailing barges and klippers were open to visitors who wanted to book a holiday on a sailing vessel. Directly others like Botter organisations joined them and also the Boatbuilding School from Bert van Baar ( who is involved in building the 2 masted cargo ship in the jungle of Costa Rica). Here you can meet Piet Blauw, maker of leeboards and masts, the editor of the Spiegel der Zeilvaart, the trad. boat scene magazine, skippers and crews of the largest Sailing charte Fleet in Europe and go aboard these boats. most are over 110 years old and stil going strong.
    https://traditioneleschepenbeurs.nl

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    ^ Looks interesting from the Wiki for Willemsoord https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willemsoord,_Den_Helder

    Nick

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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    This next photograph is not as pretty as others, but has a lot of detail that should be interesting. It is a spread of three photos with one caption, "Werk tussen wolken en water" , meaning "work between clouds and water." However, that might just refer to the page on the right, with the man operating the wheel-like a crane. Perhaps he's picking up the load in the photo on the top left, but I don't know.

    The bottom left picture has five boats in it. One larger, the Ivesser; I couldn't find any information on this boat online.
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    here are each of the three photos zoomed in. I like imagining what the lady is saying to the two men in the second photo.
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Well you certainly increase the difficulty.

    The man turning the wheel is easy, that's the mechanism that's used to turn the hood of a traditional windmill into the wind. The top part of a windmill can make a 360 degr. turn. The mechanism is clearly visible in the pictures in post #29

    The picture of the men unloading steel oil drums( with a bang!) is possibly taken in the port of Rotterdam, perhaps even in the same port as #4

    It's the picture of the boats that's difficult, it is a ship of the "Tjalk" type, a sailing vessel designed for inshore and sometimes coastal transport. There's a large variety of types, with my limited knowledge of Tjalken I would guess that is could be a "Groninger- or a Zee-tjalk" type, mainly because the "planks" and the rubrail end at the stern under a small angle and it has small oval portholes in the stern. The ship is possibly motorized and has a small steering cabin added. But perhaps another Dutchman with more knowledge will correct me.
    tjalken.jpg


    The small boat in the middle with the dodger could be an "Opduwer" a mini tugboat used by owners of a Tjalk for propulsion and/or maneuvering, but it also could be a normal motorized working boat. The wooden boat on the left seems to be a standard rowing boat for inshore use.
    A nice detail is that the man in the wooden boat is using a hand drill to drill a hole into a piece of wood with some kind of metal attached to the left end, perhaps it's a boom of a small sailing boat?

    You still can take similar pictures;
    kruize opduwer.jpg

    The weird thing is that I can't find any detail of the owner of the Tjalk in the OP, J.V. Esser, not in the maritime registers and not in the standard Google search items, which is quite rare. Almost everything in the Netherlands is registered

    A clip of an Opduwer.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCzqbPbqWaU
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-08-2022 at 01:05 PM.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Our caption today reads "De Brandaris is er altijd (Terschelling)". Terschelling is one of the Frisian Islands. My only reference to these islands is the excellent book "Riddle of the Sands" by Erskine Childers, a spy novel set in this area involving sailing, and which helped prompt England to beef up its naval defenses before WW1. The Frisian islands are, in the book, a labyrinth of channels and sandy reefs that make navigation incredibly difficult. The translation is "The Branderis is always there." The Branderis is, according to google, the lighthouse in the island and, presumably, in this photo.

    Obviously this photograph of this sloop was taken at low tide. I tried zooming in but I can't make out if there are leeboards or what is keeping it upright (I don't think it is a twin keel so maybe beaching legs on the side?).
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Terschelling is the second largest island of the Frisian isles, it's approximately 30 km's long and 5 km wide. It's a popular tourist destination.
    The northtshore along the North sea is sand, the south shore consists of silt and constructed dykes. The island has one main port with some fishery, a ferry terminal and there's a large marina for yachts. There's a large nautical college situated on the island, the island has a long history of providing sailors to the Dutch fleet.

    Terschelling houses the oldest lighthouse in the Netherlands, de Brandaris, built of brick and square shaped, the lighthouse was constructed in 1593-1594 and is still active.
    The lighthouse houses the Terschelling traffic control centre, the main coordinating "coast guard" unit of the Frisian isles, callsign "Brandaris"
    Brandaris_vuurtoren_Terschelling_01.jpg
    The name of the place where the boat was dried out is called "Dellewal" , the situation in 2022 is slightly different than the situation in 1957. A large marina is created but to my surprise the gully to the port side of the yacht in 1957 seems to have a similar shape to the gully in 2022. The yacht is situated somewhere in the circle on the map of 2022.
    dellewal.jpg
    Terschelling port and the Dellewal in 2022

    The hardest part is trying to identify the boat and her details but I'm afraid the resolution is too limited to discover real details.
    The shape of the boat doesn't look like a traditional Dutch boat with leeboards, the boat doesn't seem to be very long and she has a rather short mast which suggests a gaff rigged boat. I will check my library of Dutch sailing yacht designs of the 50's, but I'm not very hopeful.

    Perhaps the boat was one of those converted rescue sloops.
    An rather nice example:
    zeilsloepje.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-10-2022 at 04:06 PM.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Not Terschelling, but Scheveningen, The Hague
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    A Bomschuit, unfortunately not a single one of these ships survived in a sailing condition. I would have loved to sail on one.
    The square shape and the extreme Length to Width ratio made her probably a lousy sailing ship but they were seaworthy enough to sail to Lerwick on the Shetland islands for the herring season.
    A picture of a model which shows the 2:1 ratio and the curious shape;
    bomschuit.jpg
    And a Bomschuit in Lerwick waiting for the start of the herring season;
    bom lerwick.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-11-2022 at 07:09 AM.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    A Bomschuit, unfortunately not a single one of these ships survived in a sailing condition. I would have loved to sail on one.
    The square shape and the extreme Length to Width ratio made her probably a lousy sailing ship but they were seaworthy enough to sail to Lerwick on the Shetland islands for the herring season.
    A picture of a model which shows the 2:1 ratio and the curious shape;
    bomschuit.jpg
    And a Bomschuit in Lerwick waiting for the start of the herring season;
    bom lerwick.jpg
    Lovely model.
    This one slipped through the net




    Bomschuit KW 88 en Vuurbaak Katwijk https://zwitserw.blogspot.com/2013/0...k-katwijk.html

    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    "The hardest part is trying to identify the boat and her details but I'm afraid the resolution is too limited to discover real details.
    The shape of the boat doesn't look like a traditional Dutch boat with leeboards, the boat doesn't seem to be very long and she has a rather short mast which suggests a gaff rigged boat. I will check my library of Dutch sailing yacht designs of the 50's, but I'm not very hopeful."

    Thanks again, Dutchpp! The original photo isn't clear enough to provide more details. The most I can make out is no leeboards--not because I can't see any but because the boat is obviously up off the sane, which would mean some sort of keel. The rescue sloop you show is a likely candidate.

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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Lovely model.
    This one slipped through the net
    Bomschuit KW 88 en Vuurbaak Katwijk
    Yes I have walked around it once Nick, it looks impressive.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by AJBTC View Post
    "The hardest part is trying to identify the boat and her details but I'm afraid the resolution is too limited to discover real details.
    The shape of the boat doesn't look like a traditional Dutch boat with leeboards, the boat doesn't seem to be very long and she has a rather short mast which suggests a gaff rigged boat. I will check my library of Dutch sailing yacht designs of the 50's, but I'm not very hopeful."

    Thanks again, Dutchpp! The original photo isn't clear enough to provide more details. The most I can make out is no leeboards--not because I can't see any but because the boat is obviously up off the sane, which would mean some sort of keel. The rescue sloop you show is a likely candidate.
    She looks like a bilge keel boat, Something like a Lysander.


    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  24. #59
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Nick's suggestion could be correct.
    I've searched for a possible match in my books of Dutch designers and in the boatlist of the Dutch classical yacht society.
    I've searched for keel yachts from the period 1940-1957 with a gaff or lug rig and I found only 2 possible candidates both from the Dutch designer E.G van der Stadt;

    The Juno;
    IMG_1431.jpg
    And the Tulla;
    IMG_1432.jpg
    But I must admit I'm not convinced of the match, imo the mast on the OP is shorter
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-11-2022 at 11:09 AM.

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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Here is another small boat resting on the beach. The caption is "Slib (Zeeland)". Slib means sludge, and Zeeland is, according to wikipedia, "the westernmost and least populous province of the Netherlands."
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    Nick's suggestion could be correct.
    I've searched for a possible match in my books of Dutch designers and in the boatlist of the Dutch classical yacht society.
    I've searched for keel yachts from the period 1940-1957 with a gaff or lug rig and I found only 2 possible candidates both from the Dutch designer E.G van der Stadt;

    The Juno;
    IMG_1431.jpg
    And the Tulla;
    IMG_1432.jpg
    But I must admit I'm not convinced of the match, imo the mast on the OP is shorter
    And the stem is more upright as well. So we need a gunter rigged bilge keeler with short overhangs.
    Depending on the age of the image, we could be in the era of converting all sorts of craft to yachts by bolting keels under them and nailing on a cabin top.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  27. #62
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    It was a bit of a search to find this small tidal harbor in Zeeland, we look into the sun so it must be on the south side of the land along larger water with a lot of mudbanks.
    I think I've found it, it's the tidal harbor of the little village called Waarde along the Westerschelde.
    It's located in the little circle just right off the centre of the picture, in the righthand bottom corner of the picture the port of Antwerp, left of the centre the port of Flushing.
    zeeland.jpg
    The harbor is renovated a couple of years ago, the tidal poles and wooden guidance poles were removed, a part of the eastern jetty was removed. The western jetty has IMO the exact shape as pictured in the OP. The distance to the trees on the other side of the water seems comparable.
    haventje waarde1.jpg
    haventje waarde 2.jpg

    The boat is interesting, it's an open boat with a flat sheer, a large cockpit and seems to be approximately 6? meters in length, it seems to have a 20's-30's bow shape and a rather plump shaped back end. It probably is a centerboard or a keel centerboard boat although a keelboat can be moored in this mud, she just sinks in. The mast seems to indicate a Bermuda rig or a high gaff or Gunter rig although the details are hard to spot and perhaps the rig was modernized during the lifetime of the boat.
    The back end was the main defining factor most Dutch boats from that era had a more refined stern. This picture shows a boat that has the exact same hull shape.
    zzf zeilklasse?.jpg
    It's a rather obscure Dutch sailing class of the 20's-30's, called ZZV class and was even built in a keel centre board version.
    kiel centreboard zzv.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-12-2022 at 12:55 PM.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Zeeland (2)_

    Another possible candidate as the boat in the OP could be the Dutch national 30m2 class. The design is from 1936 and is slightly longer than the ZZV class pictured above. The hulll shape is comparable with the picture.
    The 30m2 class has a LOA of 7 m 50 cm, is round bilged and has rather flat ribs, she has a shallow keel with a draft of 90 cm and a rudder which is part of the keel structure.
    The boat was originally designed as an inshore racing boat for the Frisian lakes in the North of the Netherlands.
    IMG_1433.jpg
    This 30m2 class has a lot of similarities with the (keel) boat pictured in #62, but the boat in #62 is verified to have a length of 6,55 meters, so it isn't a 30m2 class boat.
    And a picture of a 30m2 during a race.
    30 m2.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-12-2022 at 01:04 PM.

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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Sorry for the delay, there are more pictures but I've been busy at work. This one is titled simply Dike, Friesland. Again the boats have little detail to them, but it is still a neat scene.
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Work is normally more important than posting pictures on this forum

    I'm quite sure that this picture is a picture of the sea dike just west of Harlingen, Friesland. The jetties are the entrance of the port of Harlingen.
    Harlingen is situated in the WNW of Friesland and is located at the shores of the Waddenzee ( down here better known as the Riddle of the Sands sea).
    Schermafbeelding 2022-11-17 om 16.57.40.jpg
    The OP was taken somewhere in the little circle.
    The location of Harlingen.
    Friesland.jpg
    Harlingen has a very beautiful tidal port (Noorderhaven) with some very old buildings and is a well known tourist attraction during the summer season.
    noorderhaven.jpg
    The ferries to two of the Frisian islands (Terschelling and Vlieland) depart from Harlingen.

    The boats on the OP lack detail but I'm pretty sure the left one is a small cutter similar to this one.
    ijsselmeerkotter.jpg
    They were used for coastal fishing on shrimps and flatfish.
    The boat on the right seems to be another tjalk, as described in post #50, or it could be one of the inshore sailing freighters of Friesland a "Skūtsje". Very shallow flat bottomed sailing vessels with leeboards which were used for transport across the Frisian channels. In the 50's the masts of these vessels were much lower, in recent times these "Skūtsjes" are used for racing and the rigs grew significantly.

    A Skūtsje.
    Skutsje.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-17-2022 at 01:57 PM.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    I've been fascinated by this very lean double ender for a while.I saw it in Hoorn a few years ago and it is the only steel hull I have ever seen with such a fine bow,quite the antithesis of the traditional style.

    Hoorn quay.jpg

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    I've been fascinated by this very lean double ender for a while.I saw it in Hoorn a few years ago and it is the only steel hull I have ever seen with such a fine bow,quite the antithesis of the traditional style.

    Hoorn quay.jpg
    John, this looks like what is called an old "Notarisboot" (notary boat) in the Netherlands, a boat that was used by the rich and famous to quietly sail around in their "habitat".
    These boats were equipped with a very fine bow to reduce drag, so a low HP engine was enough to push her around, I think the original design of this type is from the UK.
    I couldn't find the details of the actual boat on your picture.

    However an Amsterdam shipping company bought a Notarisboot in 2013 for use in the Amsterdam canals, they restored the clenched steel boat that was built by the Nicolaas Witsen shipyard in Alkmaar in 1907-1908.
    An electric engine was installed and she's equipped with a nice cabin made of wood. The name of this boat is Farahilde, I'm not sure if it's the same boat but she seems to have a similar look and feel although the front deck of Farahilde seems to have more camber and doesn't seem to be as fine, a sister ship perhaps?
    The archive of the Witsen shipyard is available (in Dutch) via a website, I will check it to see if I can find the boat in Hoorn, but that will take some time
    Farahilde.jpg
    farahilde 2.jpg
    And a pinterest pic of the rebuilt of Farahilde with a view of the front deck, the white dots are added by the Pinterest site.
    restauratie boot.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-18-2022 at 07:58 AM.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    An update on the Witsen archive investigation, it is not possible to scroll through pictures and construction drawings via the website. These drawings and pictures are only available at the actual archive location, so I won't be able to find a possible second boat I'm sorry!

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Another photo from Friesland. This has three sailboats moving down a river or canal. The caption is "Wit en grijs", which google translate says is "white and gray", which is no real help.
    No leeboards on the boat in the foreground, and a sloop set up. I imagine, though I'm no expert, that this was a relatively modern design for the 1950s. It doesn't look like a fishing boat to me.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    I'm glad I probably found the location of the picture because identifying the boat is really difficult, I'm sure I need some more time for the boat

    The channel is the princes Margriet channel in Friesland, one of the main channels. The curve in the channel correlates with the curve in the vicinity of the Spannenburg bridge, well known to every sailor in Friesland because there's a very large communication tower right next to the bridge.
    Spannenburg can be found on the map of Friesland in post 65 halfway between Lemmer and Sneek.

    The curve in the channel was widened in the 1990's to facilitate heavier ships. During that operation the original windmill was dismantled in 1992.
    The former location of the windmill.
    molen spannenburg.jpg
    And a picture of the old mill
    molen foto.jpg
    The boat is really difficult, at first I thought is was this one
    kolibri 560.jpg
    But that's impossible, the boat of this design a Kolibri 560 is to small and it was "born" in 1962, that's 5 years after the picture in the book.
    The main dimensions of the sailboat in the OP seem to be a bit larger, I would guess a LOA of approximately 6,5-7,5 meter, a transom hung rudder and a total mast height of 8-9 meters.
    I'll keep looking.
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-18-2022 at 01:39 PM.

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