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Thread: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Spannenburg (2)

    It's very hard to find a boat that fits the description and the shape of the OP.
    The only possibility I could find was this little 6 m. long yacht, designed especially for the Frisian waters bij the Dutch designer van Kampen in the 30's
    IMG_1438.jpg
    The mast height is comparable with the OP.
    IMG_1437.jpg
    I must admit that it's a wild guess, I think I see two portholes and a small bowsprit in the original picture, but that could be my imagination
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-18-2022 at 03:37 PM.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by AJBTC View Post
    Another photo from Friesland. This has three sailboats moving down a river or canal. The caption is "Wit en grijs", which google translate says is "white and gray", which is no real help.
    No leeboards on the boat in the foreground, and a sloop set up. I imagine, though I'm no expert, that this was a relatively modern design for the 1950s. It doesn't look like a fishing boat to me.
    Zoomed in, this boat looks to have reverse sheer.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Zoomed in, this boat looks to have reverse sheer.
    R
    You could be right Ron, I didn't notice.
    This is a picture of a sister ship of the drawing in #71, named "Kiek Ut" (watch out) in dialect.
    She was built by Abeking & Rasmussen in Lemwerder Germany,she is a bit larger and heavier, is 6,5 meter long and has a gaff rig.
    kiek ut.jpg

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Here we have a photo of 3 boys on a bridge or quay. It is captioned "Trio in Groningen", which you can probably translate yourself. Interestingly, this city is about 20 kilometers from the open sea, so I am not sure whether these relatively large boats are canal boats or for the open ocean (or the shallow waters between the mainland and the Frisian Islands). Some houseboats as well, I can see from modern pictures that there are still houseboats in this city.

    The large building in the middle of the background says, among other things, "porcelein glas" so I assume it is a department store. I couldn't find anything similar on google maps for something current.

    Again, this book was published in 1957. I'd like to think that at least one of these lads is still alive and still wandering down to look at boats.
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  5. #75
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    The 2 boats on the right are inland water "péniche";
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C3%A9niche_(barge)
    Common on canals and main rivers (as the Meuse) in Netherlands, Belgium and north of France.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    The three boys are standing on the "Kijk in 't jat" bridge over the "Noorderhaven" (Northern harbor) in Groningen.
    kijk in 't jat brug.jpg

    The bridge was built in the late 40's, the wrought iron balustrades survived in the last 65 years.
    The Noorderhaven used to be the tidal port of Groningen when it had an open connection to the Waddenzee via the Reitdiep. This open connection was closed in 1876.
    noorderhaven.jpg
    This recent satellite picture shows that there are still a lot of ships moored in the harbor, the bridge is located in the right hand upper corner, most of the ships are used to live on, the Noorderhaven is a bit of a sanctuary for those who live a "free" life. The township wants to regulate the number of ships, the boat owners push back
    A recent view of the Noorderhaven, the buildings have changed, the trees are a bit bigger but the boats are still there, mostly retired inshore ships as Touchatout pointed out.
    Groningen_Noorderhaven_HDR.jpg
    Groningen was and still is a city and province where a lot of shipping companies are located. These companies were specialized in coastal trading with ships like this;
    coaster.jpeg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-22-2022 at 04:05 AM.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Groningen (2)
    The possible department store on the picture is still a bit of a mystery.
    This is the map of all the properties in Groningen, the location of the possible department store building in the blue square. This building is a modern apartment building now, it was built in 1987.
    Up until now I can't find any additional information ( the history summary of this property is available but in that case I must pay €40,- to the registration office of properties in the Netherlands, which is a bit to much for a WBF post )
    warenhuis.jpg

    edit
    Some additional information, the last owner of the old building was a trading company specialized in office and hospital necessities, furniture etc. called van den Borg & Heslinga. They went bankrupt in 1983 the company was founded in 1963. So the store on the OP must have been the property of another owner.
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-22-2022 at 05:29 AM.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Thanks, as always, Dutchpp! Here is the same view as the prior photo (the boys on the bridge), about 65 years later:

    Nederlands 15-1.jpg

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Today's caption clearly lets us know where the photo was taken. It is "De sprong over de Waal bij Nijmegen", which means "The jump over the Waal near Nijmegen". I don't know why it says jump. The bridge, according to Google, is the Waalbrug, which says it is "River view bridge with WW2 history", though I think this is incorrect because it was the railroad bridge that was fought over, perhaps not this bridge? I think I have a modern photo below.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    This was definitely one of the hard fought bridges of WWII AJBTC.
    Both my parents lived in Nijmegen and I remember that my grandfather had a self taken picture of English soldiers under cover in his frontyard while shooting at the Germans.
    In september 1944 the allied forces tried to quickly cross the Rhine river to push into the Ruhr area. This route was chosen to avoid the fortified Siegfried line ( see map)
    Air borne troops were dropped north of the river Rhine to take the bridge in Arnhem, the troops south of Nijmegen had to take the bridges in Nijmegen in order to meet the paratroopers in Arnhem. In order to take the bridge in Nijmegen the troops crossed the Waal in small boats during nighttime.
    Marketgarden operastioneel plan.jpg
    This operation became known as Market Garden ( there's even a movie "A bridge too far") and the battle of Nijmegen.
    Market-Garden_-_Nijmegen_and_the_bridge.jpg
    Nijmegen after the battle.

    After 4 days of heavy fighting the troops succeeded in taking the Waalbridges ( relatively unharmed only the rail bridge had damage). The explosives on the bridge were removed before the Germans could use them.
    British soldiers removing the explosives from the Waalbridge.
    Operation_'market_Garden'_(the_Battle_For_Arnhem)-_17_-_25_September_1944-_Nijmegen_and_Grave_17.jpg
    Unfortunately the troops couldn't conquer the Rhinebridge in Arnhem, it took another long winter before the Allied forces could cross this bridge, which is now called the John Frost bridge, named after one of these heroes Lt. Colonel John Dutton Frost.

    The boats are nice, they are typical 50's river freighters, with a size of 50<100 metric tons. I always like the ones with a clipper bow, as the right one on the OP.
    This is a recent example ( by the way this one is for sale with it's mooring which is on the Reitdiep, see the Groningen part above)
    klipper.jpg
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-22-2022 at 02:39 PM.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    I remember driving in the vicinity of Groningen several years ago when my satnav got seriously confused.The reason was that a new bridge had just opened,only a few days previously.I noticed the placard on the new bridge that told the world about the very novel use of acetylated wood in the structure and by some coincidence the then current issue of Woodenboat had a feature on this type of wood and it's potential for use in marine structures.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    ^ I think it was this bridge in the vicinity of Winschoten?
    oldambt.jpg
    brug blauwe stad.jpg

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Here is the last boat photograph in this book. The caption is "Lek bij Vianen", which means literally "leak at Vianen", but I assume here means the river Lek at the town of Vianen in central Netherlands. If I had to guess, this would be around the current location of the Hagesteinsebrug bridge, which was not built until 1975. My guess is only based on the trees and the riverbank in that area, which can be seen on google maps there.
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  14. #84
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Quote Originally Posted by dutchpp View Post
    ^ I think it was this bridge in the vicinity of Winschoten?
    oldambt.jpg
    brug blauwe stad.jpg
    I believe you are right,thanks for doing the homework.This boat I saw in Workum three years ago made me smile,you can always count on a Dutchman or Frieslander to have his bicycle close by.

    Workum sighting.jpg

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    ^ Yes most of them have electric "motorized" mini bicycles now

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    For the last picture I had to do some astronavigation calculus, which was a bit rusty so don't expect extreme accuracy the date is a rough estimate!
    The river Lek is the downstream part of the river Rhine.
    Nederland 17.jpg
    The picture was taken from an altitude well above ground level, this correlates with the height of the old Lek bridge (15 meter) which was located right next (east) to the new bridge we see on the map below. The old bridge had a footpath from where the photographer took the picture.

    The bridge in 1952.
    Lekbrug_Vianen_1952.jpg
    The trees still carry their summer foliage, the picture must be taken in the period June-Oktober. Vianen is located in the approximate centre of the Netherlands, for my estimates I have used the centre of the Netherlands as the basis for the rough calculations.

    When you plot a line comparable with the sun reflection on the original picture in the map below ( from the location of the old bridge right next to the new one in the elipse),you'll get an azimuth of approx. 265- 270 degrees.
    vianen.jpg
    The sun has a height of slightly more than 3 degrees above the horizon ( the sun = 0,5 degrees), that correlates with approximately half an hour before sunset in the summer. In those 30 minutes the sun turns another 7 to 8 degrees to the North, so sunset is at an azimuth of 275 degrees ( plus or minus a few degrees), 275 degrees correlates with September 21 1956 or 1957 ( plus or minus a few days)
    The picture was shot at 6.15 PM according to the calculations.
    When we look at the weather in September 1957 (see graph below) we can see that the was a spike in sunshine ( zonneschijn) and no rain ( neerslag) on September 19, 25 and 26, perhaps these three dates are the best guesses.
    In 1956 the period from September 15 until September 30 was sunny without rain, not very helpful for determining the date the picture was taken
    weer 1957.jpg

    The boats are once again typical 50's riverboats similar to the ones on the Nijmegen picture.

    It would be nice to have a small Time Machine to check the guesses in all the posts above
    Thanks AJBTC, it was a lot of fun, I will try to visit that little harbor in Zeeland this summer, I will post a pic of it here!
    Last edited by dutchpp; 11-24-2022 at 07:36 AM.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Boats in Netherlands Post WW2 era

    Thanks so much, Dutchpp, your comments have made this much more interesting than I thought it would be!

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