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Thread: Jupiter

  1. #1
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    Default Jupiter

    Close to earth these days and a pretty amazing sight in the morning western sky.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    A good deity, Jupiter. We shoulda kept it.

    As for the planet, yeh. You can really see the Galilean moons too.
    Gerard>
    Albuquerque, NM

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Yeah, I put the binocs on it and thought I was seeing moons. Then I thought, no that can’t be possible. But I guess it is.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    It's frustrating, but I work on the invisible science. I just published a paper with a student where we found and studied magnetic waves in the solar wind outside the Jupiter bow shock that are excited by newly ionized H+ that originate as H atoms in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

    And I can't show you a single picture of them!
    "Where you live in the world should not determine whether you live in the world." - Bono

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Iím reading deGrasse Tysonís new book in which he encourages us to step back and view the larger picture of things. In spite of the bad nomenclature weíve been raised with, like sunrise and sunset, itís gratifying to sit here with Jupiter on my right and the sun on my left, and visualize the earth rotating with me aboard and seeing the Olympic mountain range rise up to obscure Jupiter while the sky gets lighter as we face more toward the sun. I know, obvious stuff, but sometimes itís just too easy and lazy to think we are on a stationary platform with things moving around us. Almost makes you want to hang on to something so you wonít fall off.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Sirius is pretty bright too, twinkling nicely.
    Anyone know why it appears to have colours changing from red to blue? the first time I saw it, I thought it was a plane.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Quote Originally Posted by birlinn View Post
    Sirius is pretty bright too, twinkling nicely.
    Anyone know why it appears to have colours changing from red to blue? the first time I saw it, I thought it was a plane.
    Doppler shift in the light emitted due to it spinning at near the speed of light. Think of it like the sound of a siren coming toward you then away from you. It sounds different no?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    We purposely went out the other night to see Jupiter. It didn't take much searching as it was very bright. My 8x binoculars didn't bring it in all that much but a 60x spotting scope showed the horizontal cloud like bands. They weren't too clear, but still visible. I need a better scope and sturdier tripod. At 60x the jiggles are very disturbing.

    Viewing it reminded us of last year when Saturn was so close and Jupiter was visible nearby but further away. Also very cool.

    Jeff

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Quote Originally Posted by White River View Post
    Doppler shift in the light emitted due to it spinning at near the speed of light. Think of it like the sound of a siren coming toward you then away from you. It sounds different no?
    Thanks- hadn't thought of Doppler shift.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Just a reminder, on the West Coast of North America, if you are up about four or five am, look above the horizon due West. We rotate out of its line of sight about 7:00-7:30am or so.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Also visible on the west coast in the eastern sky, rising around the time of sunset

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Cue the song And look at the number of views- unbelievable. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Xf-Lesrkuc JayInOz

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Quote Originally Posted by White River View Post
    Doppler shift in the light emitted due to it spinning at near the speed of light. Think of it like the sound of a siren coming toward you then away from you. It sounds different no?
    No.

    Just a very bright point source with its light refracted by the atmosphere. All stars twinkle. Sirius does it on steroids.

    Andy
    "In case of fire ring Fellside 75..."

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Yeah, I put the binocs on it and thought I was seeing moons. Then I thought, no that can’t be possible. But I guess it is.
    Some people can see them with the naked eye.
    without freedom of speech, we wouldn't know who the idiots are.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyG View Post
    No.

    Just a very bright point source with its light refracted by the atmosphere. All stars twinkle. Sirius does it on steroids.

    Andy
    But why the apparent colours? No other stars seem to exhibit that. If it is refraction, why do other stars not show it?

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Jupiter

    At our latitudes, Sirius is always near the horizon - so there's much more bobbly air to pass through. It's twice as bright as the next brightest star, and all stars (save the Sun) are, literally, point sources. So natural refraction and scintillation are the most noticeable when looking at Sirius.

    Colour sensitivity (from our cones and photopic vision) is almost dead at star brightness levels (we're mostly on rods and scotopic vision, by then). So while we can convince ourselves that Antares, Betelgeuse and Arcturus, for example, are yellow-to-reddish, and deffo not white, the scintillation of Sirius is enough to provide our eyes with a bit of colour information.

    And the Greek? Sirius means glowing or scorching. Which fits.

    Andy. Betelgeuse, betelgeuse.
    "In case of fire ring Fellside 75..."

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