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Thread: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

  1. #1
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    Default Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Back in the U.S. we had a gas range. I cooked flawlessly nonstick omelets on it, in a ceramic-coated pan. They slid right out of the pan. Every time.

    Here in Wrocław we have an induction range. I'm completely flummoxed by my complete failure to cook eggs without them sticking--REALLY sticking--to the pan. They cook weirdly, too--they never quite seem to get hard (enough) before sticking completely to the pan.

    I've used my ceramic pan (utter failure) and a couple of cheaper pans that are apparently designed for an induction range--they have metal rings/protrusions on the bottom?

    So, what's the trick? How can I get my flawless nonstick fluffy omelets back?

    I've tried lower temps, higher temps, waiting longer to put the eggs in, putting the eggs in immediately after turning on the burner. Do I need to take a sacred oath to sacrifice my firstborn to Moloch to find success here? What's the deal?

    Thanks in advance for your wisdom!

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    So, what's the trick? How can I get my flawless nonstick fluffy omelets back?

    butter

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    you could try the oven, if the stove top remains beyond you

    soufflé or quiche
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    just get a plain steel pan for cooking eggs and season it as you would a cast iron skillet
    there are some eggcelent not very expensive ones made in france
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Back in the U.S. we had a gas range. I cooked flawlessly nonstick omelets on it, in a ceramic-coated pan. They slid right out of the pan. Every time.

    Here in Wrocław we have an induction range. I'm completely flummoxed by my complete failure to cook eggs without them sticking--REALLY sticking--to the pan. They cook weirdly, too--they never quite seem to get hard (enough) before sticking completely to the pan.

    I've used my ceramic pan (utter failure) and a couple of cheaper pans that are apparently designed for an induction range--they have metal rings/protrusions on the bottom?

    So, what's the trick? How can I get my flawless nonstick fluffy omelets back?

    I've tried lower temps, higher temps, waiting longer to put the eggs in, putting the eggs in immediately after turning on the burner. Do I need to take a sacred oath to sacrifice my firstborn to Moloch to find success here? What's the deal?

    Thanks in advance for your wisdom!

    Tom
    I cook on an old school cast iron pan. They work great on induction burners and the heavy iron gives a nice slow even heat. Of course you need to season the pan first. I have one cast iron pan I use only for cooking eggs and it is amazing - I don't cook anything else in this pan because I don't want to interfere with how well the eggs do not stick. I can cook an omelet or flip fried eggs with no mishaps.

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    I cook on nothing but gas my whole life I had a bitch of a time figuring out the induction stove in Florence. Yea it boils water lightning fast, but modulating it for delicate sauces or omelets was extremely difficult. You have to go MUCH lover level like 2 or 3 anything above that will scorch what you are working on.

    49F07C69-BE86-4C9B-97F3-D1494479E234.jpg

    5D39EFCF-AC08-42E3-B521-420AA16D9BD3.jpg

    They slid right out.
    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    It’s a poor craftsman who blames his tools…….

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by phiil View Post
    It’s a poor craftsman who blames his tools…….
    Try deglazing a roux With a ball-peen hammer. Thats what cooking on an induction “tool” is like
    Last edited by Joe (SoCal); 09-21-2022 at 05:51 PM.
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    butter

    I use what most would probably consider an excessive amount of butter. Sometimes I eat a spoonful of butter for breakfast. Butter is good.

    But it doesn't seem to make a difference on this range. Not for eggs, at least.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    I cook on nothing but gas my whole life I had a bitch of a time figuring out the induction stove in Florence. Yea it boils water lightning fast, but modulating it for delicate sauces or omelets was extremely difficult. You have to go MUCH lover level like 2 or 3 anything above that will scorch what you are working on.

    49F07C69-BE86-4C9B-97F3-D1494479E234.jpg

    5D39EFCF-AC08-42E3-B521-420AA16D9BD3.jpg

    They slid right out.
    Wow--2 or 3? I think the lowest I tried was 5 so far.

    I typically used around 6 for omelets on the gas range, and 7 for scrambled eggs.

    I'll give it a try on 3. Of course, I might have to let the eggs cooking overnight...

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatbum View Post
    I cook on an old school cast iron pan. They work great on induction burners and the heavy iron gives a nice slow even heat. Of course you need to season the pan first. I have one cast iron pan I use only for cooking eggs and it is amazing - I don't cook anything else in this pan because I don't want to interfere with how well the eggs do not stick. I can cook an omelet or flip fried eggs with no mishaps.
    My wife likes cast iron. We left ours back in Wisconsin. I never really used them--the ceramic pan was just too slick to make me want to bother with it.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    Try deglazing a roux With a ball-peen hammer. Thats what cooking on an induction “tool”
    That's about how I feel as of now. Of course, with the price of gas in Europe, I may be happy to have a non-gas stove before winter is over.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    My omelet pan will adhere to some spots if it is not scrupulously clean and smooth. I scour it with Barkeeps Friend.

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    An old trick to make an iron pan non-stick is to put a little oil in a hot pan and rub half an onion over it.
    It may be worth trying that on your fancy pan.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by David W Pratt View Post
    My omelet pan will adhere to some spots if it is not scrupulously clean and smooth. I scour it with Barkeeps Friend.

    But don't do that to a non-stick pan

    Another thing is to not use vegetable oils on non-stick pans. They eventually polymerize from the heat and turn into gummy varnish that bonds with the non-stick coating. One of the primary reasons non-stick pans go T.U.

    Use animal fats -- butter, bacon fat, real lard (avoid that hydrogenated lard carp), schmalz -- as they don't do polymerize, at least not at normal cooking temperatures.

    Also, egg proteins set at a much lower temperature than you think -- c. 150° F (65° C) -- making an omelette in a non-stick pan requires a much lower heat than you might think.

    And induction hobs easily get much hotter much quicker than you might think. There's something to be said for an infrared thermometer like this, https://www.thermoworks.com/irk-2/, so you can suss out just how hot your pans are getting.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Rule of thumb with induction is don't assume you got it right. Just like a conventional electric range all heat goes into what ever is on it unlike gas. Sneek up on it until you understand it.
    Sister in law welded eggs onto a teflon coated pan at our rented cottage on the Chippewa Flowage.

    Tom

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    ...egg proteins set at a much lower temperature than you think -- c. 150° F (65° C) -- making an omelette in a non-stick pan requires a much lower heat than you might think.

    And induction hobs easily get much hotter much quicker than you might think.
    This.

    Took me awhile to get comfy with the induction range my wife bought three years ago. I learned on gas, went to electric when we got married (she was suspicious of any fumes from gas appliances), then this new thing appeared one day.

    I start eggs in a steel induction pan using butter on a 'burner' set to H (one step back from P which is MAX!!) for about 15 seconds then add eggs. 10 seconds later heat gets dropped to 4 for the duration.

    A four-egg omelette might take five or six minutes (more if I overdue the fillings), scrambled takes two or three. Sticking was chronic 'till I got over using anything higher than 5.

    (Do Polish eggs taste any different than what you were used to back here? We have a neighbor who raises chickens for eggs, those remind me of the ones I used to get from another neighbor back in the late '50's when I was a sprout. Nothing whatsoever like store-bought.)

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    I do scrambled and poached eggs in the microwave. No omelets though.

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    Try deglazing a roux With a ball-peen hammer. Thats what cooking on an induction “tool” is like
    Post of the week!
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Perfect sunny-side up eggs for lunch, off our induction range. "Basted", just the way I like them — cooked in butter over low heat, with a little bit of boiling water added to the pan, and covered with a lid. The steam helps cook them perfectly.



    Chef Jacques Pepin demonstrating the technique (though I learnt it from a short-order cook years ago, long before I was a disciple of Jacques):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-0D_kL91PI

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    Perfect sunny-side up eggs for lunch, off our induction range. "Basted", just the way I like them — cooked in butter over low heat, with a little bit of boiling water added to the pan, and covered with a lid. The steam helps cook them perfectly.



    Chef Jacques Pepin demonstrating the technique (though I learnt it from a short-order cook years ago, long before I was a disciple of Jacques):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-0D_kL91PI

    Fried eggs even I can manage. Can he (or you) cook a fluffy non-stick omelet on an induction range? If so, how?

    Or can he/you cook scrambled eggs? If so, how?

    It sure ain't working for me. Yet.

    Tom
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    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Fried eggs even I can manage. Can he (or you) cook a fluffy non-stick omelet on an induction range? If so, how?

    Or can he/you cook scrambled eggs? If so, how?

    It sure ain't working for me. Yet.

    Tom

    SWMBO and the sprogs swear that I make the best scrambled eggs. Not sure I believe them, but...

    Heat. Getting the heat right is the key.

    Also, the size of the pan needs to match the quantity of eggs. Too many eggs in too small a pan and they won't set before they start to stick.

    [Now I'll have to scramble some eggs tomorrow so I can figure out exactly what It is that I do. Hope the kids are in the mood for eggs for breakfast tomorrow ]

    This is my technique, from memory (and I like a large-ish, but still creamy, curd).

    Start with 2 eggs. Whisk them up well. Whisk in 1-2 tablespoons of half-and-half. Ordinary milk will make the eggs watery.

    With a normal skillet, you need fat and the right heat. Too low and it sticks, too hot and the eggs will stick (and burn). At the right temperature the water in the eggs will turn to steam when the eggs hit the skillet and prevent the eggs from sticking. If the fat is smoking, or the butter browning, it's too hot. You want it hot enough that when the cold eggs hit the pan, the temperature drop doesn't take the temperature too low.

    When you hit the right temperature, swirl the fat around the pan to make sure it's all coated and pitch the eggs.

    I use a silicone spatula (like this one: https://www.lecreuset.com/craft-seri...oon/JS420.html) to scramble the eggs and keep them moving.

    I wish I could be more specific with the heat, but it's a matter of experience with your pan and your hob. It is "The Craftsmanship of Risk."

    With a non-stick pan, my technique is pretty much the same, but at a somewhat lower temperature.

    Jacques Pepin's technique is different and produces very creamy scramble eggs with a very small curd. He also uses a heavy saucepan rather than a skillet, and you need a balloon whisk.

    Not my style, but they are quite good. From his book La Technique:

    5 large fresh eggs
    1 tablespoon butter, plus an additional 1/2 tablespoon, diced.
    Salt and white pepper
    1 tablespoon heavy cream.

    Break the eggs in a bow. Beat well with a whisk. Add some salt and white pepper.

    Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a heavy saucepan over low heat. When the butter foams, swirl it around the pan (get the sides, too).

    Add the eggs and whisk constantly, ensuring you get the corners of the pan so it doesn't stick. As soon as the eggs set, but are still creamy, remove from the heat and keep whisking - they'll keep cooking for a bit. Whisk in the cream and diced butter. Adjust seasonings as needed.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Thanks for the details. I seem to have a range that (so far) does not have a "right heat" setting. On a gas range I can cook flawless eggs and omelets with nary a hint of sticking.

    Does one need a special pan for an induction range? My "good" pan (which doesn't work at all so far) is ceramic coated for the nonstick--no Teflon or chemical coating nonsense like that.

    With the heat set below 5, the eggs never seem to set at all. And then, before they are cooked, they are stuck to the pan. I also use a silicon spatula and have tried constant stirring. This seems to delay the onset of sticking, but they still stick before they actually cook.

    I use butter or coconut oil--both work fine on the gas range. I use water in the eggs--makes them fluffier than milk or cream, I've found. 3 eggs at a time, occasionally 4. But the pan is big enough, I think.

    Ah, well. I'll keep experimenting. There are worse problems to have.

    Tom
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    Default Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Does one need a special pan for an induction range? My "good" pan (which doesn't work at all so far) is ceramic coated for the nonstick--no Teflon or chemical coating nonsense like that.
    Pan has to be made of or contain magnetic material in its base: if a magnet won't stick to it the bottom of the pan, the pan won't heat. So cast iron, carbon steel, or pans marked on the bottom as "induction ready".

    The induction-ready symbol is the symbol with the coils in the upper-left corner. It may or may not say "Induction" or "Induktion".



    If you use cast iron, get enameled cast iron, like Le Creuset or Staub, with a glossy smooth bottom. Rough cast iron will scratch the glass cooktop.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Thanks--that may be the problem, then. I just need the right pan. I'll check, but I don't think mine has any of those symbols.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Absent the symbols, if a magnet sticks to the base then the pan will probably work on an induction hob.

    Buy a laser death ray thermometer - this will find a multitude of uses.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=laser+t...l_6xc8kth7pw_e
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Well, I tried scrambling some eggs on 3 today. Not much of a success. A little less sticking, but they still don't cook/set convincingly. This on a pan (Green Pan) specifically described by the manufacturer as compatible with an induction range--steel ceramic-coated pan that works perfectly on a gas burner.

    The conclusion I'm edging my way toward is that induction stovetops suck for cooking eggs.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    My wife turned out a perfectly non-stick plate of fried eggs the other day. Apparently her secret was, she kept adjusting the temp up (to 7) and down. The range has a habit of turning itself on and off (glowing red and not glowing red), which prevents the eggs from cooking. And seemingly, by turning the temp to a new setting, it comes on again. She had to do this once or twice, and that forced the stove to stay on and keep heating.

    Is this how these dumb stoves work? If so, what a stupid design!

    I'll experiment with this myself and see if I can make my old flawless omelets again.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom from Rubicon View Post
    Sister in law welded eggs onto a teflon coated pan at our rented cottage

    Tom
    Ha! I welded swmbo's copper tea kettle to her ceramic cook top. It only took a couple of hours to melt the copper. Had to prize it off as a lump of copper with a chisel.
    Still paying for that one!

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    My wife turned out a perfectly non-stick plate of fried eggs the other day. Apparently her secret was, she kept adjusting the temp up (to 7) and down. The range has a habit of turning itself on and off (glowing red and not glowing red), which prevents the eggs from cooking. And seemingly, by turning the temp to a new setting, it comes on again. She had to do this once or twice, and that forced the stove to stay on and keep heating.

    Is this how these dumb stoves work?
    Not normally. Too much hysteresis?

    This is a cooktop in a rental? Landlords are not exactly known for springing for anything resembling top of the appliances. Usually more like, "what's the cheapest thing I can possibly get?"
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    Pan has to be made of or contain magnetic material in its base: if a magnet won't stick to it the bottom of the pan, the pan won't heat.
    Won't heat? Really?
    If Russia wins, there will be no Ukraine; if Ukraine wins, there will be a new Russia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Osborne Russell View Post
    Won't heat? Really?

    Induction cooktops use electromagnetic induction to heat the pan.

    Thank Michael Faraday, back in the 1830s, for it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_cooking
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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    Default Re: Cooking Wisdom Sought (induction range)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    Induction cooktops use electromagnetic induction to heat the pan.

    Thank Michael Faraday, back in the 1830s, for it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_cooking
    Thanks for that. I note that

    The control system shuts down the element if a pot is not present or not large enough. If a pan boils dry it can get extremely hot – a thermostat in the surface will turn off the power if it senses overheating to prevent cooker failures and potential fires.
    What could go wrong?
    If Russia wins, there will be no Ukraine; if Ukraine wins, there will be a new Russia.

    -- Dmytro Kuleba, Foreign Minister of Ukraine

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