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Thread: Back on the chain gang...

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Quote Originally Posted by epoxyboy View Post
    Great thread, always interesting seeing big engineering.
    With the bent sections of pipe, how do they get accurately indexed/clocked (I'm sure there's a better word) relative to the previous section? I assume the bending machine makes some sort of accurate "this side up" mark?

    Pete
    Not exactly sure. Ever cut tubes at angles to fit each other? horrible. There's a huge bend coming up tomorrow, I'll ask and get some snaps. Honestly its a question of surveying and engineering calculation. It is a nightmare for us to scan bends because they do not tally up bevel to bevel exactly, and ultrasonics depends largely on geometry, like the root and cap, being where they should.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    My helper and I got a huge laugh out of that! Thanks Rob..

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    I come by my calluses honestly.

    The eventual finished ditch was three times deeper. And longer. It also took a turn an paralleled the grass down yonder. I took that picture on day one at 0 Hot Thirty.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Let's race. You have about 3 months to beat me, so the odds are in your favour Rob.

    Lets bet an inflatable donkey?

    Shake now..

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Oh, Iím long done. I have to bust ass to make this crap pay. I ended up paying Quad to come help, and then we did another similar ďtrenching operation together. Also in a spot too tight for a machine.

    I was on a ladder this week.

    Next week is still open, so who knows? But, enough hijacking. Back to the big pipes and the welders who weld them!

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Good morning Germany.


    Attachment 119361
    Great thread, thanks.
    How do they get this into the trench without rolling it?
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Side boomed tractors. When you have a long string it is as if a ballet...

    IMG_20190810_091406_9 (1).jpg

    IMG_8661.jpg

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Attachment 119415
    Amateur hour. The conduit was a depressing reminder of how short I still was.
    Could you change your diet?
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Iím afraid I donít get that one.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Sorry. It's just the only thing I could think of unless you know someone with a rack who wouldn't mind doing a stretch?
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Ohhhh! Duh. Short! I got it! Hahaha. My brain has been extra fuzzy of late, so that one took me a minute. The rack comment really helped.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Sorry, my jokes are always crap!
    Rick

    Lean and nosey like a ferret

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    The new LNG terminal under construction at Hooksiel. It was blowing ten bells out there today.

    DSC_1792.jpg

    DSC_1790.1.jpg

    We scanned a tie-in at 0700, the other end of a drilling weld. Incredibly there was a guy in there grinding the root flush, I'm not sure how he got in, or out for that matter.

    DSC_1774.jpg

    Scanner and band lowered in with a swing shovel.

    DSC_1776.jpg

    The tracks of my tears.

    DSC_1781.jpg

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    So, how often to you find a duff weld?

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    I can't talk about this project, but typically when a project starts the repair rate might be as high as 20%. That is the % of welds that have a repair needed, not the % of weld run that needs repairing. On a 1 meter diameter weld, the weld run is over 3 meters (3150mm aprox) and if a weld has only a 29mm repair needed, that one entire weld counts in the %. So 20% sounds worse than it is, although it is generally considered that 2% or under for an entire project is a reasonable overall final number.

    IMG_20220818_105204_334.jpg

    I consider it my job to get that rate down. AUT (automated ultrasonic testing) is a system designed for pipe laying ships, where you might have a weld coming down the production line every 2 minutes. It needs to be fast, accurate and have automated systems such as motorisation, a defect sizing algorithm and automatic reporting that can deliver the inspection quickly. I can scan a weld as soon as it has cooled sufficiently and feed back information to the welders in time for them to change their parameters or welding techniques for the next one to avoid making the same mistakes. This is a huge advantage to the welding companies over radiographic testing (which also happens on land pipelines) as the site does not need to be closed and films developed. RT has a waiting time for results that can run to 24 hours. I can tell a welding foreman everything about his weld in about 20 seconds.

    Relationship forming with the foremen and welders is hugely important, as they need to trust what we say, believe us and change their specs accordingly. Most of them have never seen a TOFD scan or understand anything about our systems when we first meet them. That has to be changed quickly so that they believe we are on their side, and not the nasty welding police. Quality helps everyone. It helps the welders, it helps me, it helps the owners. Defects are everyone's enemy; welders reputations go out the window, the crews get stressed, pressure comes down from on high, and I have to work twice, sometimes three or four times as hard as I have to scan every weld twice or three or four times until they get it right. Defects bad. Quality good.

    Pipe lay ship.

    images.jpg

    AUT uses 2 advanced ultrasonic methods, phased array and TOFD, and it also uses transverse probes facing forward in a pitch catch configuration to detect transverse defects, typically cracks that run transverse to the weld in the direction of gas travel. The phased array can use up to 20 shots focussed at different depths in the steel both at the bevel and inside the weld body. All of them must be calibrated to be within specification after every weld, no matter the temperature (which affects the calibration a huge amount). Cal in, scan weld, cal out. It is like juggling 46 balls at once. There are around 500 competent AUT operator in the entire world, not that I'm one of them
    Last edited by lupussonic; 09-17-2022 at 01:26 PM. Reason: typo

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Internal pipe clamp, commonly known as a 'Sputnik'. It travels inside the pipe, operated remotely until it comes to rest under the ends of two pipes that will be joined together. It has a dual ring of circumferential rams that push outwards, fixing the ends in place and minimising ovality.

    I saw one that set itself on fire once whilst still on duty.

    IMG_20220721_103329_851.jpg

    Bevelling machine. Bring ear defenders. This one is run from the hydraulics on a tracked swing shovel. Fearsome. The swarf can be 1mm thick.

    IMG_20220721_120344_659.jpg

    Helder the welder. Yes seriously that is his name. He got a special horsey for services to quality welding. I don't just hand them out willy-nilly.

    IMG_20220720_144318_052.jpg

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Wow! Thanks for all that. Makes me pretty humble in my metal shop. Though, yet to have a failure.
    Nice Horsey!

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    What do you do in your metal shop Andrew?

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Since you ask... Architectural metal work, so gates, railings, spiral stairs, decorative stuff, along with the occasional space frame chassis for cars. Just doing some structural frames to replace the roof beams in in an old house. Did some bridges earlier, so bit of a mish-mash. Depends what people come in with as projects. I was often the 'last resort' after people had been turned down by mainstream fabricators. Keeps it interesting...

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Tough when you never know what will come through the door but it speaks to your versatility, and if you are the last resort then that speaks volumes. Respect.

    I seem to remember some wood stoves of yours?

    My welding crap. Self taught, I just go for quantity.

  21. #56
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Bevelling machine. Bring ear defenders. This one is run from the hydraulics on a tracked swing shovel. Fearsome. The swarf can be 1mm thick.IMG_20220721_120344_659.jpg
    My dad worked for a company that made railroad trackwork -- switches, frogs, crossovers, etc. -- as a draftsman.

    He go out to the shop every week or two and bring home swarf from the milling machines. Usually some sort of tungsten/molybdenum steel alloy, 1/4-3/4 inch (6-18mm) thick, curled up like a corkscrew, and colored like a rainbow from the heat.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. ó P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Yep on the stoves. Made one for us out of a 45kg gas bottle. Quite good. Then had people at the door to make more. Tided up the ideas and knocked out a few hundred. All out out of plate, as no interest in the ownership of gas bottles....
    Self taught here too, sort of wanted a decent soap box, not the wooden stuff with rope steering. So got busy under the eye of the guy building our trailers. Think I was 11 or 12. Bit later ran the trailer business. Then aeroplanes, though mostly left the welding to pros.

    Back to serious tube gluing

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    An update.. I think it was Pete asking about the horizontal directional drilling apparatus. It is pushed a few meters at a time, then the jig is moved forwards to push again.

    DSC_1846.jpg

    Scanning a few weeks ago. When a weld is hot we flip the scanner on its back and cool it with our coupling water for a few minutes hoping it will not melt the scanner wedges. Under 400C it makes no difference to the metallurgy.

    DSC_1826.jpg

    Thorsten.. welding foreman; quality welder and time served pipeliner.

    DSC_1828.jpg

    240 tonnes of side-boom lowering in a string.

    DSC_1859.jpg

    DSC_1861.jpg

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Some early morning shots.

    DSC_1807.jpg

    DSC_1868.jpg


    DSC_1878.jpg
    Attachment 121132

    Attachment 121133
    DSC_1891.jpg
    Attachment 121134

    The weather has not been kind the last month up here. We have had biblical rain and 60kph hail squalls. They guys pumping out the trenches and bell-holes are keeping up however, but the resulting quagmire of sloppy clay down there is challenging to say the least.

    Here we were joined by Homo Surveyous Digitalis-Satellatus, a curious species that never talk, they just wander around with their GPS pressing buttons.

    DSC_1888.jpg
    Attachment 121135
    Last edited by lupussonic; 10-11-2022 at 03:12 PM.

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Inside a welder tent. I will get some more shots of these guys soon when the work load drops off.

    Pipeline welding inspection.jpg

    Attachment 121138
    Last edited by lupussonic; 10-11-2022 at 03:13 PM.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Invalid attachments on the last two posts, lupu

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Thanks Berlinn, hopefully fixed. This forum software is a massive ball-ache most of the time with photos.

    Scanner and band being lifted in.


    DSC_1720.jpg

    One of the trenchers at work.

    DSC_1844.jpg

    DSC_1873.jpg

    Side-boom assistance this morning.

    DSC_1916.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 10-12-2022 at 08:40 AM.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    A big THANK YOU!!!! to you and all who work on the pipeline for your work!

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    epic stuff

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Thank you gentlemen..

    Todays offering.

    Cutting to length.

    DSC_1803.jpg

    Lowering in a three section bend string which will go under a stream.

    DSC_1909.jpg

    Internal pipe clamp. The earth here is a meter of clay, a brown peaty underlayer, then sand under that.

    DSC_1913.jpg

    Pre-dawn crane migration. I hear they trundle all the way to Africa, mate, and then return to Friesland in the spring. Amazing creatures when you think about it.

    DSC_1933.jpg

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    This is great stuff Martin. Thank you for taking the time to post it!

    So - doesn't it make you a bit nervous when the cranes fly over you on their way south?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    Thanks Martin, a world away from most of our experience, but essential to modern life.
    I was going to ask earlier about balance on those side boom bits of kit, but your photos (excellent!) just showed the balance weights.
    Are they made in Africa, or just go for the winter...?

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    The migratory habits of the pipeline crane are entirely unknown to science as of yet. My initial studies can only conclude that they are..

    A. Social in nature, and travel in herds.

    B. Unpredictable in their location, you never know where one will turn up, often obstinately blocking your intended path. Chocolate bars can persuade them to get out of your fecking way, although this approach often fails if they are otherwise occupied.

    C. Loyal to rewards. If chocolate bars are accepted, they can be forever after called upon to serve the hand that feeds them. A mere whistle even from a kilometer away with a few hand special arm gestures will beckon them and summon them to your will. I stress that a rapport involving chocolate bars must first be struck up in order for this characteristic of the species to be taken advantage of.

    D. Large, heavy, slow, encumbersome.. but immensely strong. If tamed they can make very useful pets.

    Inside the tough natural exoskeleton lies the encased 'meat brain' which controls all major functions. Be sure to pack your multi-lingual dictionary, as although they all look similar to a novice, you will never be sure which set of commands will be understood.

    DSC_1932.jpg

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    I found the photo of the internal pipe clamp on fire.

    IMG_8822.jpg

    After extinction. A sad day. I was however assured by ALL of the welders, that it was not the welders fault, nor anything to do with the welding that caused the fire. It was in fact an electrical fault, or possibly lightening (see photo above), or possibly a random tramp that had set up camp inside the pipe and lit a fire to keep warm (see photo above), and even one very reliable witness said he thought it was an act of God.. and all in all it was definitely nothing to do with the welders.

    They cost around 600K each.

    IMG_8828.jpg

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Back on the chain gang...

    I shoulda asked sooner - do they whoop as they fly over?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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