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Thread: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Hamilton, Waikato, New Zealand
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    Default A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    I wasnít going to build another boat, ever; and I wasnít going to write anything for the Forum, but you know how it is, so here we go, another winter, another boat.


    And as for recording progress on the forum, well,I have gained a huge amount of information from the various Ilur blogs (thank you guys), but havenít found much about building another Vivier design, the Morbic 12.
    So here goes, and I hope there are other Morbic builders out there who might like to contribute.


    First, why another dinghy, and why the Morbic? Iíve built several Oughtred designs, the last was an Auk. Itís a lovely tender, rows and tows beautifully, but I wanted to sail on the local lakes and find (at 72) I am no longer flexible enough to cramp in the bottom of a small boat for several hours at a time.
    I was tempted to build the Tirrik, but the Auk took 150 hours to spile and fit the planks. I could buy a kit for the Tirrik from Australia, but shipping costs are huge, and post-covid delivery to New Zealand is unreliable Ö we are a long way from Melbourne.


    Vivierís designs are beautiful, thoroughly detailed, and Vivier is the only designer I have found who sells CNC files. So when another member of the Waikato Yacht Squadron said he had just acquired an old CNC cutting machine, and heíd like to try it out on few sheets of ply, well, you canít turn down an offer like that.
    So here is the machine in operation and the end result.



    Iím going to go backwards, starting with the spars, rudder and so on, rather than race into the main hull. Weíll see how we go




    Morbic CNC sheets.jpgCNC cutter.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    NW Georgia
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    I really like the Morbic 12. Almost chose to build one but chose the Calandar Islands Yawl 16 instead. I've also built mine "backwards". I'm painting now. I still have a sail to make and the trailer to fit out.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Glues and Ooze


    So far, I’ve used three types of glue on the boat


    West system epoxy with different fillers – the most common and the most lauded of boat building glues, but:

    • Need to be fussy about the application conditions; temperature >18 įC (64 įF) and humidity (< 70%).
    • Some users have a an allergic reaction to the hardener.
    • Exothermic reaction means that large volumes of glue go off quickly.
    • Needs careful measurement and mixing
    • Clean up is often tedious and time consuming



    I’m using epoxy for all the fillets and major joints


    Polyurethene glue.

    • Single component, fewer mixing and application conditions.
    • Doesn’t keep, as the glue reacts with atmospheric water.
    • Foams and is messy, but relatively easy to clean up.
    • Quite useful in areas where there is reasonable contact between two panels; for example doubling layers under the deck, where it can be difficult to be certain that the space between the panels is completely filled. In these cases, the space will filled by the foam, and the panel edges can be sealed with epoxy at a later stage



    I used Gorilla glue on the stem doubling and rudder construction, and for bird’s mouth joints in boom and yard. It was great for the flat panels, less successful for the spars because the milled joints were not even. I don't think I will be using it again.
    Polyurethe squeeze out.jpg



    Titebond III is a yellow polyamide glue,

    • Single component, resistant to water submersion. It is easy to use,
    • Keeps for a long time, clean up with water
    • Limited gap filling properties compared with epoxy.


    Titebond ooze.jpg
    So I’ve used it on transom and bulkhead doubling, and will use it in preference to the Polyurethene elsewhere.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Nigel McC; 09-20-2022 at 03:26 PM. Reason: wrong photo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Auckland New Zealand
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Nigel I will watch your progress with a keen interest.
    I am presently putting my workshop together slowly but surely along with renovating the main house and fighting off the lions and tigers in the garden here in Mangawhai.
    The availability of CNC files were for me a real driver in choosing the Morbic 12.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Brilliant ... so pleased to find someone else building one. I have various bits and pieces completed, and will put some piccies up later.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Brilliant, so good to find some else building in NZ ... I'll put some more photos on later.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    I also posted some of the information below to the forum under “Wooden Spar Finish, after I had made three bird’s mouth spars from Oregon Pine (Pseudotsuga menziesi, Douglas Fir in NZ), using polyurethene (Gorilla) glue for the boom and yard, and epoxy (West system) for the mast. The spars are plugged with Victorian Ash plugs (Eucalyptus delegatensis) and Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata).
    However, I was disappointed with the quality of the pine, which was brittle. In some places, the strips (32 mm x 15 mm) split along the grain and in other cuts, the tangental surface lifted.
    I suspect the brittle nature has something to do with kiln drying of the original log, and wondered whether to finish the outside of the spars with epoxy.
    The general consensus was that adding epoxy to the outside would be a bad idea, and epoxy and Titebond III are preferable to polyurethene glues, (like gorrilla glue) for the bird’s mouth joints. European builders report using formulations of polyurethene that have a longer work time, but we can’t get these in NZ. Titebond III does need accurately milled joints, because it has limited gap filling projects.
    Two other things to note:

    1. You can see in the larger section, that one of the joints didn’t quite mate … I suspect because of inadequate clamping pressure – I don’t think that was particularly important, since this section was taken from the end the spar.
    2. I built the mast in two halves; cut the sheave slot, added reinforcing ply sides for the halyard sheave, added octagonal plugs above and below the sheave slot. This is to (a) reinforce the top of the mast, since the jib halyard will be attached about 100 mm above the sheave, and the slot itself will be a point of weakness. The plug below the sheave should seal the inside of the mast, to provide additional floatation in case of capsize

    I’m reasonably happy with the end results, wait and see how long the spars last in practice

    .Attachment 119948Cross sections mast.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    All coming along ... Rudder, centreboard and centreboard case component all assembled. 100 gm fibreglass cloth over the blades and on the bearing surface of the rudder and inside the case, test fitted, primed and faired.
    Note I have added a 4 mm space to the rudder core to allow for the thicker rudder blade. Some adjustment and final plaint to go
    Centreboard.jpgRudder components.jpgtest fit the centreboard.jpg

  9. #9
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Stem and transom assembly not complete.
    Notes:
    1. I cut additional holes in the stem leaf because my clamps are not long enough
    2. I predrilled a hole through the stem and false stem, above the water line, to allow me to insert an eye bolt to sercure the boat to a trailer, and possibly tow for short distances. If this turns out to be impracticable, I'll fill it in. The hole is reinforced with fibreglass and reinforced with a large washer to spread the load, so I don't think that it will weaken the stem,
    3. I used Titebond III to laminate the transom, turns out this has an additional advantage over epoxy in that there was little squeeze out into the mortices set in the inside layer, that receive the longitudinal bulkheads.Stem assembly.jpg

  10. #10
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Fitting the sole - assuming that the sole is CNC cut and the slot is accurately cut.
    1. Check centre line and distance between of all the molds, the transom, and bulkhead 3. Set a string fore and aft, and sight along to ensure there is a straight line.
    2. Mark a centre line on both sides of the sole, then measure back from the forward end of the centre board slot, 372 mm, and mark a transverse line, on the inside. This is the forward position of bulkhead 3 (C3 on Plan 12).
    3. Position the sole so that the centre line, and the bulkhead-3 line exactly match the mold centre lines and the bulk head forward face
    4. Mark a transverse line across the molds 2 & 4.1, drill a hole exactly on the centre line, and secure the sole to the molds.
    5. Check the measurements; check the chamfers on the transom and bulkhead C1, check alignment of the stem, and glue the sole on to the transom.
    6. Measure cntbd to S3.jpg



    Garboards on.jpgGarboards on

  11. #11
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    NW Georgia
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Great feeling getting that planking started!

  12. #12
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    Aug 2017
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    I'm enjoying watching the process/progress Nigel.
    The Morbic 12 is a nice looking boat.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  13. #13
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Three planks on ...not without drama. I stuffed up the last mix to the fibreglass on the sole and garboard.
    I put down a layer of resin to the ply, rolled on the cloth, filled the cloth then rolled on peel ply. Peel ply is an additional expense but does improve the surface. On the recommendation of another builder, I then smeared a final coat of resin on top of the peel ply. I can't have mixed or measured that last coat correctly, because about 25% of the total area, in patches, failed to cure after 24 hours, although the underlying cloth and resin was fully cured.
    Bugger.
    I found the most effective way to remove the uncured resin was to brush on neat Acetone in small areas (30 cm x 30 cm), work into the surface with a wire brush, then scrape off the slurry with a cabinet scraper. Smelly, laborious, and a total pain, but after 48 hours the entire surface is now cured. I sanded the surface, and will apply a fairing coat later.Scraping of uncured resin.jpg

  14. #14
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Final Plank on, now days of filling, fairing and sandingMorbic planked.jpg

  15. #15
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    I have cracked into building/assembling the mould for the Morby seeing that the biblical rain shows no sign of abating anytime soon here on the ranch.
    Took a while to find a company that could take Francois Viviers CNC files and produce the cutting list required but Paul and crew at https://www.fineformes.co.nz/ certainly made a sterling job of it.
    The spine/ladder I cut and assembled myself and will mount the mould on castors so I can move it around the workspace to gain room for the new kitchen island that needs to be built asap...
    IMG_2217.jpgIMG_2218.jpg

  16. #16
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    The two biggest changes to life on the ranch here in Mangawhai recently are the addition of a New World supermarket and a Bunnings.
    Picked up some bread and milk wandered across the road purchased some castors and bolts oh and the sun shone for the predominant part of the day.
    Looking for suggestions as to what sort of timber to use as general stock, is it a crime to use Tokoroa Teak (treated pine) for battens cleats and general bits and bobs that will never see the light of day.


    16D7A395-4D37-42A5-BB35-4058AD3AC04A.jpgB89FB844-7650-4E2D-B739-650E5C5CFB47.jpg

  17. #17
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Did you find at all that you got high spots on the planking where the stations were ?
    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel McC View Post
    Final Plank on, now days of filling, fairing and sandingMorbic planked.jpg

  18. #18
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Supply issues for the kitchen meant another day on the Morby bugger....
    IMG_2235.jpgIMG_2239.jpgIMG_2236.jpg

  19. #19
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Is this two simultaneous builds?

  20. #20
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    Yes two different Morbic 12 builds in Aotearoa.
    I have removed the parts from the tabbed cnc cut sheets of plywood and completed minimal edge cleaning and sanding.
    The build mould/jig is now PLS and ready for the glue up process to begin once the weather abates.
    My rather poor collection of clamps has seen the light of day for the first time in many moons however I will produce some more for the lap strakes.
    IMG_2244.jpgIMG_2247.jpgIMG_2251.jpgIMG_2250.jpg

  21. #21
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    I will enjoy watching these builds. I've built boats from 4 different designers and the Vivier had by far the best (most complete) plans. it's okay to assume that the designer can make changes and figure things out, but it's nice to see at least one way to make a complete boat in the plans. I'm just glad that my first build was a Vivier as that gave me enough experience to fill in the holes on the next builds.

    Btw, I had pinged Francois V to see if I could build a Morbic 12 using strip planks, instead of the laps, and having consulting a bit he made the Morbic 11 design for me, based on a strip plank build style. His designs are very well thought out. The boat school I volunteer at built an Ebihim and also an Ilur. Both came out nice.

    Good luck with your Morbic 12s! I'm sure you will love them.
    Gary

  22. #22
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    Default Re: A Morbic 12 build in New Zealand

    More rain so I am in the barn with all my little buddies having a decent glue session.
    A space like this is mind blowingly fantastic as I have hankered after a modest workshop for many moons and when I first viewed the property all I saw was the barn no dated house no overgrown expanse of garden and endless lawn areas just the barn...
    Have stem ,forward bulkhead, transom rudder and centreboard to glue up and then a bit of epoxy filleting before the sole gets sheathed and installed.
    I have mounted one of the carbon bikes to a exercise thingy as the weather is junk and a couple of sessions a day gives one time to contemplate the intricacies of all the projects one has underway.
    Most important is the kitchen island however the linen stainless steel top has yet to emerge from the fabricator.
    Have some Kauri posts to mill and dress crikey it is tight grained.
    One thing I have learnt recently is you cannot have enough benches.
    IMG_2255.jpg
    IMG_2275.jpg

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