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Thread: riddle of the sands-esque

  1. #1
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    Default riddle of the sands-esque

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Could easily be the Manukau harbour.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Oh, I am so there.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Read that book, too. Was not that impressed. Can't understand why sailors seem to consider it some sort of great literature. I suspect folks are just enchanted with the Author's life.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Do you know anything about the boat or photo, Pablo? I just love it.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    nope
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    I believe this pic is posted here before, if I remember it correctly it was a discussion about an island or a port somewhere in the USA.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    Read that book, too. Was not that impressed. Can't understand why sailors seem to consider it some sort of great literature. I suspect folks are just enchanted with the Author's life.
    I knew nothing at all about the author or his life the first time I read "The Riddle of the Sands," yet I found the book, itself, completely enchanting.

    If you found the book good enough to finish, regardless of your apparent rejection of the author's life choices outside of his authorship, I'd suggest that you might owe the man's memory some gratitude for the enjoyment you found in those hours.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    ...
    Very atmospheric! Thanks!

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    jimmy w!
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    My opinion of the book has absolutely nothing to with the Author. I mentioned him only because his background is rather colorful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Noto View Post
    I knew nothing at all about the author or his life the first time I read "The Riddle of the Sands," yet I found the book, itself, completely enchanting.

    If you found the book good enough to finish, regardless of your apparent rejection of the author's life choices outside of his authorship, I'd suggest that you might owe the man's memory some gratitude for the enjoyment you found in those hours.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Tudor Collins, the photographer


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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    Read that book, too. Was not that impressed. Can't understand why sailors seem to consider it some sort of great literature. I suspect folks are just enchanted with the Author's life.
    The scene buying the gear is fantastic, as is its continuation, throwing stuff over the side.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque



    Survivors from the shipwrecked 'Niagara'. Shows a group in a lifeboat. Most probably taken by Tudor Washington Collins in June 1940.

    Tudor Washington Collins' memoir says that he was the only photographer who managed to get out to meet the survivors of the 'Niagara' coming ashore.

    You can copy this item for personal use, share it, and post it on a blog or website. It cannot be used commercially without permission, please ask us for advice. If reproducing this item, please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), and ensure the following credit accompanies it:

    Collins, Tudor Washington, 1898-1970: Photograph of survivors from the shipwrecked Niagara. Ref: PAColl-8634. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22902802

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy W View Post
    Tudor Collins, the photographer

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by David W Pratt View Post
    The scene buying the gear is fantastic, as is its continuation, throwing stuff over the side.
    The slow and (OK, oh-so-overwritten) first chapter "I'm really bored. I wish something would happen" is like blue touch-paper before the match is applied. It's the first real spy thriller, and re-read here yearly, at least.

    Andy
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Image definitely evokes the book!

    I enjoyed the book.
    The 'sequel' by a different author, not so much.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Whenever I invite someone cruising, it never fails that I'm tempted to ridicule their "Portmanteau"

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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Part of the fascination is the fact that the book was written in 1903 or 5, basically 10 years before the first world war. So as the build up escalated it was seen as prophetic.
    The Mullet boat in the Op has an Auckland registration which is why I thought it was probably Aucklands sacrificial harbour, the Manukau. Its shallow and rife with banks like that, I grew up next to it and latterly my family looked at it every day from our or their family home. Its the sacrificial harbour because its where all the industry , sewerage and general pollution was dumped or 'treated' for most of the last century, saving the Waitemata, 11 miles away across the ithmus, for most marine pursuits. The Waitemata is deep and pretty and ranges out into the rather excellent cruising ground of the Hauraki gulf. The Manukau has a very dangerous bar and is exposed to the prevailing Westerly winds .
    But I see Pam has identified it as the Whangateau harbour , a tiny little and shallow harbour with a bar entrance or very narrow channel about an hour North of Auckland by car.
    The boat itself is of the old generation mullet boat, ie a working fishing boat style and it has a raised cabin added. Later Mulleties became a lot beamier , known for over sized rigs and hard drinking and hard racing . There are still a few gaff boats around or boats changed back to gaff, but most are 22 ft bermudan rigged now.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    ^ Thanks for the history and local lore, John!

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    Read that book, too. Was not that impressed. Can't understand why sailors seem to consider it some sort of great literature. I suspect folks are just enchanted with the Author's life.
    I was also unimpressed and wondered what all the acclaim was about.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: riddle of the sands-esque

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyG View Post
    The slow and (OK, oh-so-overwritten) first chapter "I'm really bored. I wish something would happen" is like blue touch-paper before the match is applied. It's the first real spy thriller, and re-read here yearly, at least.

    Andy
    I also love it. Would have run guns with Erskine and his wife for Republican causes anytime....liked the real Asgard's dinghy , would suffer the novel's converted lifeboat's flaws, or even the movie's yacht. As a spy novel it is also good in a Hardy Boys sort of way. But then, I think A Spy of the Old School by Julian Rathbone is as good as the genre gets...

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