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Thread: Helping my son fix his transmission

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Salt Lake City, Utah
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    389

    Default Helping my son fix his transmission

    My son asked for some help repairing the auto transmission in his old car. I have done this a few times and can do the basics like clean and rebuild a valve body etc.

    I use YouTube videos often for DIY projects. You never know what you might turn up with the search function. This gem appeared...



    Moreover, whenever a forescent skor motion is required, it may also be employed in conjunction with a drawn reciprocation dingle arm, to reduce sinusoidal repleneration.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    n.c. tn
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    10,140

    Default Re: Helping my son fix his transmission

    I dunno.. ISTR the 'original' turboencabulator preceded the catalytic converter by a long shot.. say from the 60's? tho likely no video exist from then.

    (-:

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Helping my son fix his transmission

    That was funny!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Helping my son fix his transmission

    According to the University Of Wiki, the Turbo Encabulator has been around for 78 years!

    The turbo encabulator (later the retro encabulator) is a fictional electromechanical machine with a satirical technobabble description that became a famous in-joke amongst engineers after it was published by the British Institution of Electrical Engineersin their Students' Quarterly Journal in 1944.[1][2] Technical documentation has been written for the non-existent machine, and there are a number of parody marketing videos.
    The original machine has a base-plate of prefabulated amulite, surmounted by a malleable logarithmic casing in such a way that the two spurving bearings were in a direct line with the pentametric fan. The latter consisted simply of six hydrocoptic marzelvanes, so fitted to the ambifacient lunar waneshaft that side fumbling was effectively prevented. The main winding was of the normal lotus-o-delta type placed in panendermic semiboloid slots in the stator, every seventh conductor being connected by a non-reversible tremie pipe to the differential girdlespring on the "up" end of the grammeters.
    — John Hellins Quick, The turbo-encabulator in industry, Students' Quarterly Journal, Vol. 15, Issue 58, December 1944



    ITS CHAOS, BE KIND

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Helping my son fix his transmission

    British! For some reason I thought it was a Chrysler thing. (-:

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    o
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    10,514

    Default Re: Helping my son fix his transmission

    Not nearly as classic or funny, but it brings to mind when my high school autoshop teacher related how he helped a woman who had been scammed by a local mechanic when he ‘overcharged’ her for six sets of muffler bearings.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    59,365

    Default Re: Helping my son fix his transmission

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Bow View Post
    According to the University Of Wiki, the Turbo Encabulator has been around for 78 years!

    The turbo encabulator (later the retro encabulator) is a fictional electromechanical machine with a satirical technobabble description that became a famous in-joke amongst engineers after it was published by the British Institution of Electrical Engineersin their Students' Quarterly Journal in 1944.[1][2] Technical documentation has been written for the non-existent machine, and there are a number of parody marketing videos.
    The original machine has a base-plate of prefabulated amulite, surmounted by a malleable logarithmic casing in such a way that the two spurving bearings were in a direct line with the pentametric fan. The latter consisted simply of six hydrocoptic marzelvanes, so fitted to the ambifacient lunar waneshaft that side fumbling was effectively prevented. The main winding was of the normal lotus-o-delta type placed in panendermic semiboloid slots in the stator, every seventh conductor being connected by a non-reversible tremie pipe to the differential girdlespring on the "up" end of the grammeters.
    — John Hellins Quick, The turbo-encabulator in industry, Students' Quarterly Journal, Vol. 15, Issue 58, December 1944

    Reminiscent of Prof Stanley Unwin

    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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