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Thread: I'm the new owner of Winwood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Cuba City, WI USA
    Posts
    40

    Default I'm the new owner of Winwood

    I'm the new owner of Winwood. She is the Windfall Yacht that was featured recently in the "Save a Classic" section or Woodenboat magazine.

    She is in pretty good shape but needs to have some of her planks put back on. I have all the original planks and all but two will be used again. I have a few questions about how to proceed.

    She has a new keel, new floor timbers and all the broken ribs have been sistered. All the work was very well done.

    Here are my questions:

    First, What is the best choice for bedding compound. Ive heard of both White lead and tar being used. Ive been unable to find white lead bedding compound. Is the tar anything special? Is it similar to roofing tar or is it pine tar?

    Second, Only a few planks have been removed on each side to access the keel and ribs. When I put the planks back on should I start from the top down or from the bottom up. Top down seems to make more sense to me since the keel has been replaced and the rebate for the garboard plank needs to be cut. If I start from the bottom I may not get the rebate in the correct place and end up with a gap when the last plank is screwed in place.

    Third, This yacht is carvel planked with 1/2 inch thick Honduras Mahogany. It does not look like there was any corking used. Is it acceptable to put the planks back on and not cork. Will it soak up ? Perhaps I just didn't see the corking.

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    59,355

    Default Re: I'm the new owner of Winwood

    Dunno why you need bedding compound, priming the faying surfaces with thick old oil based paint should be all that is needed. Bedding compound is for crappy fit.
    Your thoughts about working down to the rebate is sound.
    Tight seams were the best quality boat building. 1/2 inch planking does not leave much room for caulking, but you fit must be good. Edge set the planks to ensure tight seams. Then she should take up tight as the wood swells in the tide. If you are putting her into salt water, knife soap into any leaking seams until she takes up.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    3,757

    Default Re: I'm the new owner of Winwood

    Bedding compound is warranted in the rabbet, dolphinite is a good choice. Seal the wood first with shellac or paint. Tar is closer to roofing tar which works well but doesn't take paint so only in hidden areas.

    I would work up, the garboard is the toughest plank to twist into place, it should not be the shutter plank. Start there and work up to the area of least twist for the shutter. The shutter should not be in the tuck either, not familiar with your boat, maybe that doesn't apply. The rabbet can be cut immediately, use the frames and floors as the guide and fair it in. A plank fid shows when you have it right. You will need to make a new shutter plank, no way all the old planks go in perfectly regardless which direction you go. Probably new garboards too. Other planks can probably be reused.

    If there is a caulking bevel, you need caulking. Roll it in, planking is too thin for a mallet. For tight seam the planks are not beveled for caulking. It needs near perfect fits, but was fairly common in some regions.
    Last edited by J.Madison; 08-15-2022 at 06:34 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    EU
    Posts
    1,279

    Default Re: I'm the new owner of Winwood

    The planking was originally sealed with a thin cotton string placed in a rolled (not cut) groove. For this to work the fit must be perfect, A&R even beveled the steam bent ribs. I would first install the garboard, then it's up to you if you continue up, or start again and go down. It's probable that you will have to dress the edges for fit, any resulting gap will have to be made up by a thin, glued spline. Fasteners, both screws and rivets have to go one size up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Cuba City, WI USA
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: I'm the new owner of Winwood

    Thanks for the reply(s). I think I have the directions I need.

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