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Thread: Staunchions vs simply leaving the frames tall/proud?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    Sale, Gippsland, Australia
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    Default Staunchions vs simply leaving the frames tall/proud?

    Watching the latest Tally Ho video I found myself wondering why Leo cut all the frames to be fair with the deck, and then installed staunchions to support the guard rails? Wouldn't it be easier/stronger to simply leave the frames jutting above the deck and to attach the guard rails directly to those? I don't for one second doubt Leo's knowledge or skill, so there must be a reason that I haven't thought of, and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on it. I've never worked on a boat that size before so it's definitely beyond my experience!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    58,650

    Default Re: Staunchions vs simply leaving the frames tall/proud?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chucknuckle View Post
    Watching the latest Tally Ho video I found myself wondering why Leo cut all the frames to be fair with the deck, and then installed staunchions to support the guard rails? Wouldn't it be easier/stronger to simply leave the frames jutting above the deck and to attach the guard rails directly to those? I don't for one second doubt Leo's knowledge or skill, so there must be a reason that I haven't thought of, and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on it. I've never worked on a boat that size before so it's definitely beyond my experience!
    Water lays against the up slope sides of the stantions and causes rot. It is much easier to replace stations than the tops of the frame timbers.
    Furthermore the ideal spacing of the stantions may well vary from those of the top timbers.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    La Conner, WA
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    525

    Default Re: Staunchions vs simply leaving the frames tall/proud?

    Generally using separate stanchions or top timbers is best practice, it allows a bit of freedom in fairing the caprail line especially if there is flair, and as Peerie said keeps problems away from the much harder to repair frames.
    Having said that, I was up at Bill Gardens island studio with a client wanting a 55’ Sailboat, and Bill took us by a nearby yard building a similar sized boat, so my client to get some idea of just how big a project this was. They had let the steam bent frames continue past the deck line to the caprail line plus 6” or so more. They rigged up a cup set up using pipe fittings I think, that had a section of maybe 1-1/2 pipe reduced to about a 1/2” nipple. The nipple was bored for and screwed into the end grain of the frame. Then they proceeded to fill and re-fill the cups with some kind of linseed oil/diesel/turps/pine tar solution. The first day the refilling was almost constant, and then the refilling gradually increased to maybe once a day.
    i cannot remember how many days they said it took before the solution started coming out the butt ends of the frames, but you could see the staining.
    The idea was that this process would both stabilize and preserve the frames and prevent leaks between them and the covering boards.
    Vessel name was “Bear”, and unfortunately I don’t know what happened to her, or those frames.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Somewhere in South Central PA
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    3,732

    Default Re: Staunchions vs simply leaving the frames tall/proud?

    Also, the staunchions are smaller dimensions than the frames on Tally Ho.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
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    21,850

    Default Re: Staunchions vs simply leaving the frames tall/proud?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    Generally using separate stanchions or top timbers is best practice, it allows a bit of freedom in fairing the caprail line especially if there is flair, and as Peerie said keeps problems away from the much harder to repair frames.
    Having said that, I was up at Bill Gardens island studio with a client wanting a 55’ Sailboat, and Bill took us by a nearby yard building a similar sized boat, so my client to get some idea of just how big a project this was. They had let the steam bent frames continue past the deck line to the caprail line plus 6” or so more. They rigged up a cup set up using pipe fittings I think, that had a section of maybe 1-1/2 pipe reduced to about a 1/2” nipple. The nipple was bored for and screwed into the end grain of the frame. Then they proceeded to fill and re-fill the cups with some kind of linseed oil/diesel/turps/pine tar solution. The first day the refilling was almost constant, and then the refilling gradually increased to maybe once a day.
    i cannot remember how many days they said it took before the solution started coming out the butt ends of the frames, but you could see the staining.
    The idea was that this process would both stabilize and preserve the frames and prevent leaks between them and the covering boards.
    Vessel name was “Bear”, and unfortunately I don’t know what happened to her, or those frames.
    I bored a one inch hole the length of a regular paddle bit straight down the truck of Woodwinds tree/pole mast 38 years ago , and have kept it full of poison since. The spar ,second growth Dfir,was popped in the morning after launch and has never been back out.
    I've often wondered why is was not standard practice with large fir stems etc.

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