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Thread: Small Boat Sailing

  1. #1
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    Default Small Boat Sailing

    In gusty winds isn't all that fun, actually.

    Took a friend out for a few hours yesterday. Winds consistently above 20 mph, frequent gusts as high as 32 mph. Double-reefed, we were OK. But it wasn't that much fun. (The sailing part, anyway--spending time with a friend was great).

    Not a good day to give a person lots of tiller time in an unfamiliar boat--one which happily dips the lee rail when pressed too hard, and uses a relatively uncommon sheeting set-up (the French misainier technique of hooking the sheet block on a cleat manually at each tack).

    On a long trip or wilderness cruise (which is my primary venue for sailing), I'd have either spent the day running or broad reaching (if the wind was favorable for a destination I wanted to reach), or I'd have stayed ashore.

    I'm either getting wiser, or wimpier, about my sailing choices. Or maybe they're the same thing.

    Tom
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Tom, with those conditions, I'd have stayed ashore on our deck and had a beer with my friend while we watched the waves roll by. I must admit that I'm a light wind sailor. Even though I am certain that my small boat, with its lead keel, is plenty safe in winds above 20, I'm just not comfortable. I like things a lot more relaxed. At 74 years old, I reckon I deserve calm.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Yes! I'm learning that dinghy sailing is different than sailing bigger boats with ballast keels. Concern for running aground has been replaced with concern for capsize. Winds above 15 mph have me wondering if I should stay home or take the kayak instead. Elliott Bay here in Seattle is open to the northwest and our recent hot days have brought strong north winds funneling into the bay and the wind waves combined with commercial boat traffic makes for a busy sailing experience. Too busy, sometimes.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I might well have stayed ashore, but we were the only boat that showed up for the local Sunday race series. I couldn't resist the easy victory for my boat's first-ever race participation.

    (Actually, the races were cancelled too.)

    Tom
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Loudon View Post
    strong north winds funneling into the bay and the wind waves combined with commercial boat traffic makes for a busy sailing experience. Too busy, sometimes.
    Yep, that's exactly it. Not that I was overly concerned about capsizing, but it gets awfully busy managing the boat to avoid it.

    Tom
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I was sailing Blue Moon on Sunday, 20mph gusting 25mph, the strongest we've been out in so far, not much waves as the wind was across the river.

    Blue moon is 16ft long 4ft wide with 150kg 3ft deep keel.
    According to onlookers she was heeling to 60degrees and I noted the rudder to start loosing its grip.
    She points very well but is not so good down wind.. loosing out badly..
    Until I get new sails with reefing points that's the strongest we'll go out in.

    Traffic.. try this.
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I'm with Jeff both chronologically and wind-use wise. At 74 I'm finding out big boat (Santana35) is a bit too much of a handful to doublehand in our normal 20-30 knot winds and my Mirror dinghy is still out of action pending finishing and would be too much of a handful in those winds anyway. I'm <this> close to selling the bog boat and reverting to trailering my little boat to compatible waters. We also have a Shearwater, built without the centerboard (built by Richard Stover...it's the grey/red one that WB used for the plans pic for years) that isn't fond of the 2' waves and big winds we have here.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    When I was new to sailing two different people I took out to try sailing ended up buying power boats.
    In my defense it was in the Columbia Gorge and to me 25+ knots against the current was just another day on the water. I should have rescheduled but I was working on call 24/7 and opportunities to match schedules were scarce as hen's teeth.
    My boat was up to the task having been designed for San Fransisco Bay conditions and I had been trained by a no-nonsense instructor. I was having too much fun and was oblivious to my guests' discomfort.
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I had a little 10ft 6" grp boat built in S Africa. Quite tubby and sort of double ender. Came with a ally pole mast and a dreadful sail. Converted to stayed rig with a gunter main and a bit later a little bowsprit and jib. It thrived on rough weather. After a fun afternoon on the Algarve coast, the local marineiros cautioned us about the conditions, as the wind was getting stiff. We nearly beat them back to the harbour, up wind. They had a small rib... They had the grace to smile as we hit the ramp.
    Had more fun with that little bateau, than almost any other boat.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    so pretty pictures

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I sail in the protected waters of a local Fjord/inlet. However it can have some strong outflow and inflow winds.
    I sailed my Shellback all winter and last summer I took it on a couple of 40km (there and back) camping jaunts. Once with my girlfriend.
    I had some hairy/ tiring moments on both trips.

    Sailing in winter is great because the area I was sailing in was largely deserted whilst in the summer it's powerboat/jetski mayhem. But if it's windy with white horses I generally didn't go out , or not far. It would be pretty easy to die of hypothermia if I ended up in the drink.

    I find my boat can handle much of the weather, and so can I, generally, but spending 6 hours tacking 6 nautical miles up a narrow inlet in short steep chop just gets a bit tedious and tiring.
    Anytime there's whitecaps I'm going to get wet and if it's cold, I need rain gear. etc.

    I find small boats are largely about pleasure, exploration, and some adventure.

    It's good to know I can handle these situations, for the most part, when I can't avoid them, but unless I feel like I want a testing experience. I generally avoid them.
    Like the old adage.

    Small boat sailing is lots of fun though. I find it easier overall.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    When windspeed exceeds the boat length....it a serious ting. no matter what size vessel.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    When windspeed exceeds the boat length....it a serious ting. no matter what size vessel.
    I fully agree. Nature is not to be trifled with.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxophilite View Post
    I sail in the protected waters of a local Fjord/inlet. However it can have some strong outflow and inflow winds.
    I sailed my Shellback all winter and last summer I took it on a couple of 40km (there and back) camping jaunts. Once with my girlfriend.
    I had some hairy/ tiring moments on both trips.

    Sailing in winter is great because the area I was sailing in was largely deserted whilst in the summer it's powerboat/jetski mayhem. But if it's windy with white horses I generally didn't go out , or not far. It would be pretty easy to die of hypothermia if I ended up in the drink.

    I find my boat can handle much of the weather, and so can I, generally, but spending 6 hours tacking 6 nautical miles up a narrow inlet in short steep chop just gets a bit tedious and tiring.
    Anytime there's whitecaps I'm going to get wet and if it's cold, I need rain gear. etc.

    I find small boats are largely about pleasure, exploration, and some adventure.

    It's good to know I can handle these situations, for the most part, when I can't avoid them, but unless I feel like I want a testing experience. I generally avoid them.
    Like the old adage.

    Small boat sailing is lots of fun though. I find it easier overall.
    Your post reminds me of something I wrote for an article a while back:

    I got to Gile by noon, an hour later than planned. The promised good weather hadn’t yet appeared. The rain had stopped, but bristling gray clouds raced by low overhead. A flag hung from a pole near the town-park dock, snapping and cracking in the wind. Waves were crashing over the dock and onto the launch ramp, driven by a fierce southwesterly blowing across 4 miles of open water. Streaks of white foam blown off the wave crests formed long wavering lines across the dark surface of the water, a sure sign of serious wind.

    I’d need two reefs at the very least—more likely three. That was verging on foolishly windy for windward work in my low-freeboard sail and oar boat, which even the designer describes as needing “a deft hand on the tiller when the wind pipes up.” It would mean a mile or two dead into the wind to reach the nearest islands—three or four hours of cold, wet sailing even if all went well. Rowing into such a stiff headwind wasn’t appealing, either. Luckily, the map showed another ramp a few miles away on the flowage’s eastern arm, which looked like it would be a little more sheltered. I got back in the car and drove off to find it, wondering if my years of small-boat sailing had made me wiser, or just more fearful. Perhaps they’re the same thing.
    Tom
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Bump this thread with a different take on "Small boat sailing..."

    in light winds on hot sunny days when you have 20+ miles to go isn't much fun.

    Actually, I enjoyed it a lot. But it took a long while. And these days being out in the sun that long really seems to take a toll. All I wanted to do the next day was stay in the shade. Which, fortunately, I was able to do, since I'd sailed to an island that is a state park--all shady beech/maple forest, cliffs, and cedar groves.

    I wonder how I'd fare in the Texas 200 nowadays. When I last sailed it in 2016, the heat and sun didn't seem to bother me much. Then again, "light winds" are not a thing in the Texas 200 usually.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Over 20 knots and our little boats are starting to run out of options. Over 20 miles to row and you’re going to need some current under you.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    In my little 9.5 ft row/sail dinghy I've had a couple of unintentional gybes in strongish winds here on Elliott Bay in Seattle, in part due to my general lack of small boat experience but particularly due my not getting on with the boomless main. I'm now building a boom for the sail which should settle this, and also make reefing easier.

    After my last gybe and near capsize I beached the boat, took down the rig, and continued on with oars. Very pleasant exercise and less fiddly than sailing. Years ago I didn't have the patience for rowing but now in my dotage it seems just right. This fall I'll build a dedicated rowing boat, probably Flint.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Loudon View Post
    In my little 9.5 ft row/sail dinghy I've had a couple of unintentional gybes in strongish winds here on Elliott Bay in Seattle, in part due to my general lack of small boat experience but particularly due my not getting on with the boomless main. I'm now building a boom for the sail which should settle this, and also make reefing easier.
    Sailing a boomless standing lugsail my ownself, I'm curious why your experience has persuaded you that gybing might be better with a boom. I'm not saying you're wrong, just trying to learn from your perspective. I find gybing a boomless rig quite simple--the key for me has been to manage the sheet by hand, and when it's windy, to reel in most of the slack on the sheet before gybing.

    And keeping your heading far enough off the wind to avoid unintended gybes. But there's certainly less damage you can do to passengers with a boomless gybe, which is worth something, maybe.

    I do, however, dispute the claim that reefing is easier with a boom. I suppose it might be a bit quicker if you're set up with lines to pull the new reef points down to the boom with a quick pull at each end. And, I suppose, you can choose not to tie in the nettles at all. So, quicker? Yes.

    But all I need to do to reef a boomless sail is roll up the foot and tie in each reef point. That's really really easy. And, I think, maybe not much slower than it would be with a boom.

    I stand ready to be corrected--or at least disagreed with--by others. What do y'all think?

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Over 20 knots and our little boats are starting to run out of options. Over 20 miles to row and you’re going to need some current under you.
    What is this "current" thing of which you speak?

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Sailing a boomless standing lugsail my ownself, I'm curious why your experience has persuaded you that gybing might be better with a boom. I'm not saying you're wrong, just trying to learn from your perspective. I find gybing a boomless rig quite simple--the key for me has been to manage the sheet by hand, and when it's windy, to reel in most of the slack on the sheet before gybing.

    And keeping your heading far enough off the wind to avoid unintended gybes. But there's certainly less damage you can do to passengers with a boomless gybe, which is worth something, maybe.

    I do, however, dispute the claim that reefing is easier with a boom. I suppose it might be a bit quicker if you're set up with lines to pull the new reef points down to the boom with a quick pull at each end. And, I suppose, you can choose not to tie in the nettles at all. So, quicker? Yes.

    But all I need to do to reef a boomless sail is roll up the foot and tie in each reef point. That's really really easy. And, I think, maybe not much slower than it would be with a boom.

    I stand ready to be corrected--or at least disagreed with--by others. What do y'all think?

    Tom
    Tom, thanks for your reply.

    My problem with boomless rigs is almost certainly due to my lack of experience, and due to habits learned on larger boats with boomed main and unboomed jib. On past boats when going downwind, the main usually behaved nicely but the jib needed attention to keep it full, and a whisker pole was often needed, especially going wing and wing. My current boomless sail wants to collapse or switch sides when going directly or nearly downwind, so like you suggested, I need to keep the wind more to one side. Maybe that's the whole of it right there. With more patience and experience (and unlearning my habit of going directly downwind) the boomless rig would likely be fine. But I was thinking that a boomed sail, especially on an unstayed rig where the boom could be could be swung forward of perpendicular, would be easy to control.

    Another obvious attraction to a boomed main is that no sheets need be touched when tacking; just move the tiller and switch sides. When tacking my current rig, hauling in the new leeward sheet one handed (2:1 purchase), while keeping the other hand on the tiller, while simultaneously scooting my butt to the new uphill side, I feel like the one-armed paper hanger.

    That said, my boomless sail sets beautifully on a reach, and is in other respects easy to handle. It is clearly safer (though the boom is above my head) and arguably simpler, though the sheet leads aren't that simple.

    When reefing my boomless rig, I could only think of fully dropping the sail in the boat, gathering the foot of the sail, tying the reef points, and re-hoisting. If the sail is not fully lowered, the wind will cause clew end to swing over the side and out of reach (my sail has full length battens), so I can't just partially lower the sail, tie the reef in the tack end, snug up the halyard, then grab and tie the clew reef. My thought with my new boomed main is to install jiffy reefing with a cheek block on the boom at the reef clew position, with the reefing line led to the forward end near the boom. Standard jiffy reefing. Then the entire job is done at the mast, and it doesn't matter if the boom end has swung out over the water. My boat is small and my home waters are bouncy. If I can accomplish the entire reefing process while seated at the mast, so much the better.

    Again, these are the thoughts of someone new to the workings of small unballasted boats. My reaction is to apply bigger boat solutions, which may be misguided.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Jack,

    that makes sense. I agree you certainly can't reef a boomless sail without dropping it entirely first--or at least, not easily or efficiently.

    I've always done the same even when sailing with a boomed balance lugsail, though I suppose it would be possible to reef with the sail still partially up. If I remember right, a lot of the PNW lugsail enthusiasts (boomed balance lug yawls) tend to sheet in the mizzen and drop the mainsail entirely to reef anyway--but they have the mizzen to hold the boat into the wind, so the sail drops nicely into the boat. Maybe it'll work just as you envision to set up to reef with the sail still partly up, with all controls at the mast.

    It'll be interesting to see what happens--thanks for posting!

    As for running, I think even with a boom that the small boat consensus is, dead downwind isn't a desirable heading. Too easy to gybe, and also slower speed. I think the usual tactic--certainly what I do--is to "tack" downwind so gybing is always predictable.

    A boomless sail can't be let out as far without risking an accidental gybe, so I've found this is even more important with a boomless sail. It pretty much removed all my worries about gybing.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I've always dropped my boomed lug rig into the boat to reef. When I need to reef, having everything calm and down in the boat seems better than things lashing about above me.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Thanks Tom, and Toxophilite, for your excellent advice. I built the boom, but in use it added complication and was a head banger, so the drawbacks outweighed the usefulness. I will revert to the original boomless rig, and will learn to tack downwind

    An aside, one of the great pleasures of small boats, especially owner-built boats, is problem solving and then making small modifications. Building and rigging my boom was a great learning experience, even if it seldom gets used. Other examples below.

    I've heard you should never cleat the sheet in a small boat, but don't see how it's possible to never let go of the sheet. I first began jamming the sheet under my foot when I needed a free hand, and then installed the pair of cleats shown below, which are used with caution. They are close at hand, and release instantly, and are mounted on the daggerboard so are removed with the board when rowing.

    Next is a cart for wheeling the boat from my pickup bed to the water. The fin slots in the daggerboard trunk and is very secure. When I lift up one end of the boat, the cart just drops out. The cart is small enough to take with me in the boat.

    These are not especially brilliant and probably not original (though original to me) but very satisfying to figure out and then build.



    Attachment 115529 Attachment 115530

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Loudon View Post

    I've heard you should never cleat the sheet in a small boat, but don't see how it's possible to never let go of the sheet. I first began jamming the sheet under my foot when I needed a free hand, and then installed the pair of cleats shown below, which are used with caution.


    Attachment 115529 Attachment 115530
    Cam cleats!

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I posted this in another thread, but it seems to fit here too. One of the dangers of these small boats is dipping a rail and downfloading leading to capsize. So something to lessen the influx of water would seem to increase safety. In bigger boats this might be decking or a washstrake. Has anyone employed or considered some sort of spray cover along the gunwales to decrease the risk of downfloading? I don't think it would have to be completely waterproof just something to slow the inflow for the second or so that the rail is under. I'm envisioning something that could hang from the gunwale when not needed but then be tightened with a line or bungee when wanted.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott de M View Post
    I posted this in another thread, but it seems to fit here too. One of the dangers of these small boats is dipping a rail and downfloading leading to capsize. So something to lessen the influx of water would seem to increase safety. In bigger boats this might be decking or a washstrake. Has anyone employed or considered some sort of spray cover along the gunwales to decrease the risk of downfloading? I don't think it would have to be completely waterproof just something to slow the inflow for the second or so that the rail is under. I'm envisioning something that could hang from the gunwale when not needed but then be tightened with a line or bungee when wanted.
    In practice with my boat, I've concluded that downflooding isn't an immediate threat for capsizing. Here's the boat:

    DSCN1212 (2).jpg

    As you can see, low freeboard. The reserve stability doesn't really kick in until the leeward gunwale is right down at the water's surface. I've taken in water over the rail many times that way. Once I got comfortable knowing how the boat behaves, I've never thought that I was in danger of capsizing just from taking in water that way. Plenty of time to react appropriately once the rail dips--so far, anyway!

    It's often a good signal that it might be time for another reef.

    I suppose a wash strake would keep the boat drier in rail-dipping conditions, but from what I've seen, I don't think that would make it less likely to capsize.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Great picture Tom. I've been getting more comfortable sailing my Caledonia Yawl with the rail right near the water and it seems very stable that way but I've never actually dipped the rail. I've been caught by gusts a couple times and I was sure the rail would dip but it just rounded up with out dipping. But this experience has got me thinking about what if it dips. Maybe it is not such a big deal - guess I need to push further and find out....

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott de M View Post
    Great picture Tom. I've been getting more comfortable sailing my Caledonia Yawl with the rail right near the water and it seems very stable that way but I've never actually dipped the rail. I've been caught by gusts a couple times and I was sure the rail would dip but it just rounded up with out dipping. But this experience has got me thinking about what if it dips. Maybe it is not such a big deal - guess I need to push further and find out....
    Well, I spent the entire first season with my boat sailing with one reef in the mainsail because I didn't trust the reserve stability yet, and thought that downflooding would mean capsizing. Gradually, I've come to believe otherwise.

    I also did 2 capsize tests, and on the second one (2 people aboard), we leaned to leeward while sailing in 15+ mph winds (small lake, no waves). The rail dipped, we kept leaning to leeward, and the boat flooded. It was obviously "sunk" so we jumped out over the leeward rail to recover it. But then, once we were out, it re-righted itself. That also helped me not worry about downflooding quite so much.

    But, every boat is different... It's wise, I think, to be thinking about these things, and to push the boundaries gradually, rather than suddenly!

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 07-28-2022 at 07:55 AM.
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott de M View Post
    I posted this in another thread, but it seems to fit here too. One of the dangers of these small boats is dipping a rail and downfloading leading to capsize. So something to lessen the influx of water would seem to increase safety. In bigger boats this might be decking or a washstrake. Has anyone employed or considered some sort of spray cover along the gunwales to decrease the risk of downfloading? I don't think it would have to be completely waterproof just something to slow the inflow for the second or so that the rail is under. I'm envisioning something that could hang from the gunwale when not needed but then be tightened with a line or bungee when wanted.
    I rather like the narrow side decks my First Mate has, they serve as a good warning that you're about to go over. On occasion I've sailed along with the rail buried and water halfway up the deck just for fun. Whenever I've had water actually come in I've been able to round up before it became dangerous.

    One plus to sailing small boats is the ability to go 70 MPH to windward! I made it to New Jersey today to help my in-laws move and I hope to get some sailing in. Here's how to bring two trailers with you.


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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Hmm... One boat, two trailers. I've done it the other way 'round, too:

    DSCF6296.jpg
    Attachment 115561

    Small trailer boats sure do increase your ability to reach distant cruising grounds quickly!

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 07-29-2022 at 07:29 AM.
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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    It's wise, I think, to be thinking about these things, and to push the boundaries gradually, rather than suddenly!
    100% in agreement there Tom, and your signature tag serves to remind of that axiom.

    Good luck with your new adventure across the Big Pond to our east! Let us know of your new experiences when you have time.

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    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    I rather like the narrow side decks my First Mate has, they serve as a good warning that you're about to go over. On occasion I've sailed along with the rail buried and water halfway up the deck just for fun. Whenever I've had water actually come in I've been able to round up before it became dangerous.
    I know we've discussed this before, but it's such a good reminder how individual/personal each person's experience with small boats is. Neither my brother or I have ever come anywhere near to dipping the lee rail or putting the side decks in the water in his Phoenix III. But then, we sail with the 76 sq ft balance lug rig, which is obviously a lot less sail area. We've never even needed to sit on the side decks to keep the boat flat, even when sailing solo in some pretty windy winds.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    359

    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I know we've discussed this before, but it's such a good reminder how individual/personal each person's experience with small boats is. Neither my brother or I have ever come anywhere near to dipping the lee rail or putting the side decks in the water in his Phoenix III. But then, we sail with the 76 sq ft balance lug rig, which is obviously a lot less sail area. We've never even needed to sit on the side decks to keep the boat flat, even when sailing solo in some pretty windy winds.

    Tom
    Whenever I'm hiking out with one foot hooked under the main thwart I wonder what the difference is. I have to assume it's a bunch of things that add up. 28 extra square feet of sail, Okoume vs Baltic birch hull, lack of camping gear. I built the 10" extended mast to get the boom up, not sure if your brother did as well. And I've been pretty lax about reefing until recently too. Even the plank laps probably help a minute amount.

    Although... maybe your anti type A boat is just baloney. I bet you've got one of those high tech canting keels under there!

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saco, ME
    Posts
    2,413

    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I have become "wimpy" as well, Tom. Still sailing my GIS....it is the beating into gusty conditions...living on the edge solo is one thing....adrenaline and all that. But when you have someone aboard and you want them to come out of the sail feeling like they would do it again, it is exhausting and stressful.
    I am actually a good boat handler, thanks to the GIS years. I have found that I can not make passengers nervous even though I am! But I am a bit tired of it. So when my Goat goes back into the water, it will have comfy side benches, the new and improved reef system (essentially the "Joost" system which I have already tested and can reef under 2 minutes), a lighter box boom, and the sail has a hollow leech and I think will be easier to use. But I will always have a reef for those gusts! This is why I spend time for each of my boats, designing the reef system and they come with a plan for how to reef and the hardware for setting it up. Reefing has been the key, and a system that works quickly and effectively is a huge boon for small boaters.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,621

    Default Re: Small Boat Sailing

    I would echo Clint’s thoughts, as a crew that enjoys a day sail may decide dinghy cruising is worth a try. That said, “small” is definitely relative. I am loving my 6m Jewell—it sails like a big dinghy, and is trailerable and easy to launch and retrieve. With decks and a small cabin, I suspect Tom would not characterize her as a small boat. One aspect of dinghy cruising in sail and oar type vessels that I find limiting is the fatigue factor after several days of constant low amplitude motion. Beyond 5-6 days, I find it tiring enough to become a real safety issue, less if conditions are less than nice. The bigger boat dampens the constant “jiggle” enough to cruise more comfortably and with less fatigue.

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