Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345 LastLast
Results 106 to 140 of 147

Thread: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Not quite summer yet, though…
    You can never have too many clamps

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Unintended duplicate post. This forum software behaves in very odd ways sometimes - or it was a lag in internet connection(s) coupled with my impatience. Back under my rock, I think…
    Last edited by Alex1N; 11-16-2022 at 10:59 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Since our trip to Christchurch, but not because of it, I have had a dose of Covid. I'm OK now, but it did slow me down a bit. My wife had it too, but remained asymptomatic, fortunately. We were both well vaccinated. We had to stay at home for a week, but we didn't mind that!

    I've been back in the workshop this week, making some visible progress for the first time in ages.

    On Tuesday I glued the stem knee to the keelson and stem, with epoxy glue (105/205), assisted by a couple of silicon-bronze carriage-bolts, and a couple of s.b. 2 1/2" woodscrews, more or less according to Eric's fastenings layout provided with the HV16 plan. I used masking tape to keep the glue off the surrounding parts. This is the second stem knee I had made, as it incorporates the mast-step, and I had realised that the mast for a sprit rig has to be able to rotate. My piece of elm was 50mm (2") thick, so I made another knee the full thickness, to provide a square step. I still have to put sides on it, with drain-holes.
    P1040597.jpg

    On Wednesday I cleaned it up with my angle-grinder.
    P1040598.jpg

    On Thursday I fastened the transom knee to the keelson with epoxy glue and a couple of screws. There is a hole for a 6" bronze lag-screw into the skeg. It looks like I should have put it a bit further forward. I haven't drilled the skeg for it yet.
    P1040595.jpg

    On Friday, after a lot of checking that it was lined up correctly, I fastened the transom to the transom-knee, with Sika 291 polyurethane flexible sealant and s.bronze woodscrews, in case the oak transom "moves". I chose the black colour to look like tar, as I will also be using it in the planking seams, and some of it might show. (The other colours were white or grey.) I plan to finish the inside of the planking with the old "boat sauce" recipe provided in several books, so it will go blackish after a while. I have since discovered that there is a Sika 291 LOT (long open time) sealant in a mahogany colour. Hmm.....
    P1040603.jpg

    Today (Saturday) I have cleaned it up by scraping away the squeezed out sealant. The last photo shows the skeg, which still needs a bit of fitting before I fasten it on. I will use the black sealant for that, too. It will have the lag screw in it, and a 6" carriage bolt through the keelson just forward of the mould, and some more screws. After the planking I will put a vertical strip of hardwood on the transom to cover the end-grain of the skeg and provide a thicker base for the rudder fittings. There will also be a "shoe" of kwila, right along the length of the keel and skeg.
    P1040596.jpg

    So, after the skeg will come the final shaping of the keel and stem rabbets to take the garboards. I plan to put the garboards on with the sealant in the seams, ring-nails along the keelson, and 1" (25mm) woodscrews in the hood-ends.

    Any comments welcome.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-25-2022 at 11:47 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Looking great, Ian. Good to see the keel ish bits in place, very heavy-duty!

    Sorry to hear about the covid attack, but it sounds as though you‘ve both weathered it really well.

    there is a Sika 291 LOT (long open time) sealant in a mahogany colour. Hmm…..
    Hmm indeed. Thanks for the heads-up: I’ll have to do some digging on this side of the Ditch. That Bostik sealant that you used on Kotik is nowhere to be found over here using the description used on the .nz Bostik website, although there are some quite similar products on show. While Sikaflex is a different manufacturer altogether, I won‘t hold my breath. That won’t stop me looking - with crossed fingers - though.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    947

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Great progress Ian.

    That 291 is great stuff, have used it quite a bit over the years in a few large wooden joinery projects that had to allow for some expansion and contraction.
    Looking forward to the planking posts.

    BTW where are you sourcing your bronze bolts from?

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Alex and Mike.
    I get my silicon bronze screws and bolts from "Boat NZ" in Christchurch. They have been a mail-order firm since 1949. I have always found them friendly and good to deal with, both online and in person. See https://www.boat.net.nz/products/sil...32644007526485 Also search bolts, lag screws, machine screws, nails and roves. The slotted-head screws with a cut thread are stronger than the rolled threaded ones, and it is said to be easier to clean out the slot for replacement in later years, but I have put a dab of sealant into the hole first so they will probably never come out.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks for the pictures Ian. She’s coming along nicely. It will be rewarding to get full length planks out. I’ll have to see if we can get that Sika291 Wood colour here.
    It’s great that Covid didn’t deal you a rough hand, glad you pulled through.

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Andrew. Yes, we're OK now, thanks.
    I expect to get some of the straighter planks out of single lengths of that kauri, but I don't mind dog-legging some of them, to keep the grain going straighter along them. I will get all the long narrow bits (risers, etc.) out of them too.
    I fitted the skeg yesterday, and will install it permanently today. It has a bolt and a lag-screw in it, and some woodscrews. Pictures to come.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Here are some pics of the skeg. Yesterday had a lot of interruptions, including a big tidy-up, so I put the skeg on last night.

    There's a little bit of rocker in the profile.
    P1040605.jpg

    Port side.
    P1040609.jpg

    Starboard side.
    P1040611.jpg

    The whole length of it.
    P1040610.jpg

    Some people from a local social club are coming this morning to see what goes on here, so we will be having a sort of mini boat-show.

    Cheers.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #115
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Conway, MA
    Posts
    6,229

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Ian. Looking good. Have fun with your show.

  11. #116
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
    Posts
    2,422

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Good progress.
    You asked ... so
    One thing to do with the skeg, unless you never ever intend to drag the boat up and down the beach, is to give the back corner a strong radius. Every hull it seems I tend to ponder and fine tune the depth of the skeg. You're fine,but could probably take a wee bit of depth off the back end. I understand your inclination to cover the end grain of the skeg but I've never found this to be critical or neccessary. Some builds involve a structural sternpost, this does not. The transom appears adequate to directly fasten strap gudgeons for 1/2" pintles which is all I've ever done, I tend to use off the shelf SS pintles and gudgeons on these little boats. Are you concerned about transom thickness for this? The sprit rig can use a square mortise but I agree rotation is probably a better idea. I use ring nails in the hood ends. I believe they are less likely than a countersunk screw head to split the plank and, when piloted properly, are a more reliable fastening into (transom) end grain. Of course ring nails make some folks nervious - perceived lack of reversability, repairability etc. You're transom is oak, I 'spose you'll get a good enough bite with cut thread screws.

  12. #117
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Thad and Eric.
    I just spent an hour doing a posting but lost it. I'll try again tomorrow.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #118
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,906

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    I just spent an hour doing a posting but lost it. Ian
    Ian, if I have a long post to write, I write it in a Word doc first then copy and paste into the Forum thread window. Easier to save the Word doc to your hard drive as you go. Depending on how you handle the pictures, you can copy and paste the link from a third party hoster to the Word doc, if that is where you keep your pictures, or, if uploading the pictures directly to the Forum software, you can do that after you past the text from Word.

    I occasionally post from my smartphone, but nothing long or complex
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  14. #119
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks Alex. That's good advice! Good to see you're still watching.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    OK. Here's another go at it.

    Thanks Thad. Yes, we enjoyed our little boat show last Tuesday. Nine guys came. I showed them Eric’s plans and the offset table, my lofting, the HV set-up, Kotik, and the Feather Pram, yet unlaunched. I had a slide show going on this lap-top and my books displayed along the bench but we forgot to take photos at the time so I bunched the books up later for this one. (My model of Islesburgh lives in the house these days.) They all seemed quite interested. Then we all walked along to the local coffee shop.
    P1040628.jpg

    Back at work, I tried the wallpaper pattern on the set-up to see if I could make it more accurate, but it was hard to control the edge-set with no firm base under it.
    P1040616.jpg

    I abandoned the paper pattern and made a 3mm MDF pattern for the forefoot, attached it to a full-length spiling batten, and spiled the garboard by my favourite method, compass-arcs.
    P1040617.jpg

    Then I made a complete pattern of the plank from 3mm MDF and was pleased to find that it fitted both sides of the hull. (I don’t expect to make full patterns for all the planks.)
    P1040635.jpg

    Here on the floor, right to left, are the wallpaper pattern, the spiling batten, the complete pattern, and the starboard garboard. I cut it out with my jig-saw (sabre-saw) about 1/8” clear of the line and faired it down to the line with a plane. On the bench is the port garboard, ready to be cut out.
    P1040638.jpg

    Eric, thanks for your thoughts. I will give the skeg a radius (after the layer of kwila), epoxy-seal the end-grain, and put some kind of metal strap around it, up to the lower rudder fitting, and leave it at that. I do not intend to use the dinghy for cruise-camping (been there, done that), but just to take it out on the local harbour on fine days, now and then. Most of the shoreline is rocky but the harbourside suburbs have small sandy beaches to land on if I want to go ashore. (The sand was brought here as ships’ ballast.) I don’t think the skeg will get heavily worn.

    I have seen the stern-posts on some of the designs in John Gardner’s book, but your design uses the knee instead. I am not concerned about the thickness of the oak transom for the rudder fittings, as long as it’s the same for both upper and lower fittings. The fittings will be off-the-shelf, nothing fancy.

    The mast will have a round base, rotating in a square step. I found that rotation was desirable with the mizzen on my Sooty Tern Trondra, and it is mentioned in articles about sprit rig in WB magazines #76, 1987 and #89, 1989. I think it is good to be able to let the sprit swing right around to the centre-line forward, on occasion. With its unstayed mast, the boom of the leg o’ mutton sail on my Swampscott dory Clarsach could do that. If the mast does not rotate, the sprit will go around it on one side but not the other. I had to get the mast-step right before I started the planking.

    I bought the s.bronze cut-thread screws (1”x 8g) for the hood-ends about 2 months ago, so I will use them, but will be careful not to sink them in too deeply. These are used for the hood-ends of the carvel planking in the WB Mastering Skills videos by Greg Rossel and Rich Hilsinger. I also have the ring-nails for along the keelson.

    I hope to get some planks steamed and installed this week. I think it's only about the first 4 ft of 3 strakes that will need steaming, and I will use a heavy-duty plastic bag.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-04-2022 at 02:49 PM. Reason: A liitle tweaking.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #121
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    947

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Measure thrice, cut once, then fair. Great stuff Ian.
    3 mm MDF is my go to pattern material, a nice balance between flexi and stiffness.
    I see we have a few books in common too.
    Carry on, Sir.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  17. #122
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Mike. Careful, not fast, is me.
    I think my books are a fairly typical collection of the ones that people like us should have. I didn't buy them all at once, of course.
    Aye aye, Sir.

    Today I cut out the other garboard and matched them up at my planing bench.
    The boards I used to make the garboards were the two shortest ones you can see on top of the pile in #102, p.3. Then I used the off-cuts of the two boards to make duplicates of the ends of a garbpard and tried them on the set-up. I was pleasantly surprised to find that they pushed down into place with very little trouble, just judicious leaning on them and clamping them down, unsoaked and unsteamed. I am leaving them clamped like this overnight, to see how much they spring back in the morning. Then I will steam these dummies, to see how they behave.

    The starboard quarter.
    P1040640.jpg

    The starboard bow. Where the gaps are, the plank is not quite right down in the rabbet.
    P1040641.jpg

    And another view.
    P1040644.jpg

    I will steam the ends of the real garboards anyway. When they are set in shape, it will be easier to make some small adjustments to the fit of them, and easier to handle the full length of them.
    The next couple of weeks will be interesting!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-05-2022 at 03:39 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #123
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
    Posts
    2,422

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Ian,
    Yup I eventually learned the hard way it is better for the sprit rig to rotate!
    Wow the planking stock looks beautiful and appears quite supple. I would hesitate to try a cold bend like that even with wet cedar. The garboard looks huge but looks about right too, the sharp toe gives it that big footprint. For what it's worth how I install these first steamed planks:
    *Complete fussy fitting and plane the gains on the bench, port and starboard, bow and stern. Knock down what will be the inboard plank edge. I do the gains with rabbet plane and fence.
    I do all the gain on the one plank (I've done them every way possible) - starting 12-16 inches out full thickness to a feather edge or corner, with a very slight roll. Slightly curving ramp. It's
    easy to take too much off. Final fairing occurs on the boat with the lap bevel.
    *Organize clamps and pads. If I'm working solo, organize a lassoe to hang the back end of the plank. Bed surfaces on the boat. Wet out and put the plank in the hot steambox, for cedar
    about 1/2 hour, no more.
    *The crux - bring in the hot plank and push it only into the stem rabbet. Pilot, and one fastening, ring nail in my case, into the meat of the plank just above the gain. Then continue wrapping the
    hot plank around the forefoot, in the case of the garboard, and clamp to molds from bow to stern. Run a fastening into the transom. The plank is now set. Add fastenings bow and stern, and
    along the keel or previous lap. Along the length of the plank generally fasten from midships out.

  19. #124
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Eric. It's helpful to have the sequence written out like that. It's a bit different from the way I hung my plywood planks.

    Today I put sides on the mast step, before I install the planking.
    P1040651.jpg

    Then I took the clamps off the dummy planks that were on the frame overnight, and they sprang back to almost their original flatness. Then I steamed the forward one, in the blue polythene tube with the wallpaper stripper, and it bent very easily into place. I let it cool and then took the clamps off and it held most of its shape. I have marked out the positions of the frames and nails on it and will transfer the marks to the whole pair of planks.
    P1040649.jpg

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #125
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    She does have a very fine bow. Hope that the garboards go well.
    You can never have too many clamps

  21. #126
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
    Posts
    2,422

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    I just noticed how nicely those garboards are tucking into the toe and forward end of the keel. Nicely done Ian, that is a very challenging rolling bevel and transition. I would be lucky to do as well.

  22. #127
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Starting to get very exciting Ian, I bet you’re looking fwd to getting out in shed for the first plank fitting? I look fwd to that posting.

  23. #128
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, guys.

    Yes, Alex, she does have a fine entry, a nice flat run, and a sturdy mid-section, all making for good performance.

    Thanks for the compliment, Eric. Here are some photos of the garboard installation. It has been a bit of a challenge alright, and it's not quite perfect, but it's done now anyway.

    Hi Andrew. Glad you're watching, but I have to tell you (all) that there is about to be another delay. We will be leaving home on 28th December to go cruising on the Abel Tasman National Park and Pelorus Sound as two separate trips, launching from Motueka and Havelock respectively, and then going to the Antique and Classic Boat Show at Lake Rotoiti (Nelson Lakes) for the first weekend of March. We did a good trip all over Pelorus Sound ten years ago on our Eun Mara Islesburgh, and have been on the ATNP several times but have not explored all of it.

    I tried all sorts of clamping arrangements. These photos just show a few stages along the way. I have left the stem square for clamping the end of the plank.
    P1040655.jpg

    This is Eric's "lasso", I think.
    P1040656.jpg

    Plastic bag steamer. The vent holes were a bit small.
    P1040658.jpg

    C-clamps
    P1040661.jpg

    and old plywood lap-planks, from other jobs, suitably modified. They work well.
    P1040664.jpg

    To be continued.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  24. #129
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Garboards, Part 2.

    I put a fairly thick bead of black Sika 291 on the stem, keel rabbet and transom. In Will Stirling's book, he uses Gorilla glue here (only here).
    P1040675.jpg

    The finished garboards, forward quarter,
    P1040689.jpg

    and dead ahead.
    P1040695.jpg

    Stern view.
    P1040693.jpg

    You can see here that the outer edge of the plank has gone a bit flat between the two forward moulds. Another mould here might have been a good idea, as Eric has provided for the HV 16, which has the moulds further apart. I will see if I can prop the edges up a bit and put some steam under them.
    P1040688.jpg

    That's all for the garboards. I have used almost two cartridges of sealant so far. I won't be using as much in the plank laps, but I don't expect to get another plank on before we go away.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-17-2022 at 09:22 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  25. #130
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    After doing the garboards, I decided to make a steaming box out of the cheap plywood that was the backing for my 3mm MDF lofting boards, for steaming the ends of the planks instead of plastic bags, and possibly the frames, and the floorboards.

    The box is generally along the lines of the example in Greg Rossel's book. It is probably biggrer than necessary, because I just ripped the plywood into four equal strips. I might cut it down to half its height yet.
    P1040677 - Copy.jpg

    This arrangement uses the frame-steamer to supply the steam. The pipe is pushed well in. I had to build the box deep enough to take it.
    P1040678 - Copy.jpg. .

    and this is the result. Pretty good, I reckon.
    P1040680 - Copy.jpg

    I also tried this arrangement. It worked too. I could put another pot on the other element, as well.
    P1040682 - Copy.jpg

    The "lid" is trimmed down from a bulkhead I was making for a stitch-and-tape kayak I built in 1982, so it is about time it gets used for something. It is just 4mm ply with a piece of 50mm (2") polystyrene foam glued to the back of it, but it will be quicker to close when I put hinges on it. It has potential anyway.
    P1040684 - Copy.jpg

    Cheers, and Merry Christmas!

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-18-2022 at 03:29 PM. Reason: add "and the floorboards."
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #131
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    537

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    That’s quite an extreme twist in that steamed sample! Looking good.

    Happy Christmas and Near Year .

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-19-2022 at 02:50 AM. Reason: Pyot
    You can never have too many clamps

  27. #132
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Well done Ian. It’s always a pity that the most difficult plank is the first, why is that?

    Merry Xmas and have a great sailing new year to you and Alison

  28. #133
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Alex. Yes, I just twisted the piece around as far as it was willing to go.

    And thanks, Andrew. I think I am past the most difficult parts of this build now (maybe). It was like that with my EM Islesburgh, too. The first job after setting up the building jig was to laminate the kwila frames. I hadn't done that sort of thing before. The next plank on this one will start using the clenching nails. I will have to brush up my technique on some scrap first. I learnt it in Thad's class in 2015. Yes, we are looking forward to our sailing summer too.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #134
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    947

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Looks like you are having loads of fun, Ian.

    Lake Rotoiti, 2024 for me, all going well.

    Merry Christmas. Have a safe and enjoyable sail.

    .

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  30. #135
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Mike. We will put Rotoiti 2024 in our diary! Merry Christmas to you too.

    I tidied up the forefoot and the transom a bit, so they look better now. They will look even better when they are painted! I will shape the cutwater one plank-width at a time as I put the planks on, leaving the stem square for clamping the next hood-end. There will need to be more taken off the gains yet.

    P1040697.jpg

    P1040699.jpg

    P1040701.jpg

    and a Happy New Year!

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-22-2022 at 04:29 AM. Reason: gains
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #136
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    5,328

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Happy Solstice/Christmas/New Year to you! Always nice to start my day off with a bit of coffee and the continuing Adventures of Ian Milne.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  32. #137
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NW Georgia
    Posts
    386

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Looks very sharp! Going to be fun watching the planks go on.

  33. #138
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Shoreline, Washington
    Posts
    2,422

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Happy Holidays Ian. Looking good.

  34. #139
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks guys.

    Steve, I'm honoured! I will make another thread called "Kotik's Continuing Adventures" in the People and Places section.
    Dale, Welcome aboard. No more planks until March though.
    Eric, Thanks for your input. We are looking forward to our trip.

    While not rushing to put another plank on, I thought I would see if I could get the shape of a mould 2A (or 3, whichever you prefer), and it was not hard at all. Here is a photo of the set-up, showing the new mould in red lines, the tick-stick and other gear I used. The outer line is from the lofting, which is to the outside of plank, and the inner line is the shape of the mould.
    P1040704.jpg

    and these are the offsets:
    P1040705.jpg

    Hey, it worked! I am doing this posting on a tablet computer that we will take with us. I set my camera (yes, a camera) to take smaller photos, and transferred these ones directly from it. I will try to do a posting now and then, depending on internet access, battery power, and my somewhat limited computer skills. No promises!

    As Steve said, Happy Solstice, Christmas and New Year to all of you.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  35. #140
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    In the course of the last few busy days, I have installed the new mould at station 2A, or 3, whichever you prefer. (The moulds are numbered by feet back from the bow.)

    I got the new mould wedged in place, pushing up against the outer edges of the garboards but cut away from the keelson. Then I covered the area with wet towels and plastic sheeting overnight, blocked the holes in the adjacent moulds, and put the steamer under the garboards for 25 minutes.
    P1040706.jpg

    There seemed to be a slight improvement. I can't do any more to it, anyway.
    P1040707.jpg

    Here's the new mould in relation to the others. I think it gives a better idea of the intended shape. The sheer is marked with green tape.
    P1040708.jpg

    That's all for a while.

    Cheers,
    and Happy New Year!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •