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Thread: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

  1. #1
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    Default A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    It's been a long time coming, but I have finally got started on that Eric Hvalsoe dinghy I have mentioned on my "Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!" thread.

    In my younger days I did a lot of canoeing and kayaking and camping on and by rivers, lakes and the sea, and then by my “sail and oar” (motorless) Swampscott dory Clarsach. On my “Big Retirement Trip” in 2004 Alison and I visited the Centre for Wooden Boats in Seattle and discovered the existence of Port Townsend. On our return home I built my Eun na Mara Islesburgh, designed by Iain Oughtred, from 2005 to 2008. After that we went to five Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festivals, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018. Always different, always good! I went to as many of the practical demonstrations put on by the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding as I could and Alison went to lectures on cruising. We spent pleasant times with David Jones and his Eun na Mara Suzanne (and later with Steve Borgstrom and his EM Marianita), and with the “Sail and Oar” people. I saw Eric’s own HV16 Bandwagon on the hard and in the water at different shows, and had some friendly discussions with him. I was further encouraged by the forum threads of Rich Jones and Jeff Patrick (I met Jeff, too). I bought both Eric’s HV16 and HV13 plans at different times, but various things got in the way, including three more boats (Sooty Tern Trondra, Kotik Kotik, and my lock-down project Feather Pram), and an unrelated health problem which is now resolved, I'm pleased to say. Aged 78, I have decided that the HV13 is more practical for me now, for fine days on our local harbour.

    On our 2017 trip we visited the Centre for Wooden Boats again, where I hired their HV15 and rowed it up the middle of Lake Union with the Victoria seaplanes roaring in and out on both sides of me, which was quite exciting! The boat rowed very nicely.

    I have built several kayaks over the years, by various methods, restored my dory, and now, after building four of Iain Oughtred's plywood/epoxy boats, excellent as they are, I will be building this one by a different method, the "old-fashioned way”, as it was originally designed for. I have most of the books on the subject, and as well as watching the demonstrations at Port Townsend, have attended a course at WoodenBoat School where I had "hands on" experience of traditional construction in Thad Danielson's class. The course and Thad’s book will be of real benefit to this boat. There are also all the very fine videos by Off Center Harbor and others, which no doubt many of us are familiar with these days.

    So, over the last year or so, we got my old building frame down from the workshop ceiling and set it up with two sheets of construction plywood (which will become a steam-box in due course), topped it with 3mm MDF, and painted it white as a lofting board. On 17th May just gone, I drew the lofting grid, and have now completed the lofting and made cardboard patterns for the moulds. I expect to be able to work at it fairly steadily now. I like using a boat but I like building one too!

    Links:

    https://sites.google.com/site/erichvalsoe/

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...the-Hvalsoe-13

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?231482-Building-a-Hvalsoe-13

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-and-the-HV-16

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?177857-Hvalsoe-18

    Small Boats Monthly articles on HV 16 Bandwagon and HV 18 Haverchuck.

    Here are some lofting photos. Lofting was part of Thad’s class. At the time, I saw the transom and the rabbeted stem as future challenges, which are shown here. I also looked at the thread “Lofting the Brewer Catboat” by Jim Ledger, and found his stem on page 21, done the same way.

    P1040036.jpg

    P1040067.jpg

    P1040061.jpg

    P1040062.jpg

    P1040064.jpg

    I have made cardboard patterns from the lofting, and am in the process of making the moulds out of my old Kotik moulds.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Enjoy the build. I've still got my HV13 station molds stacked against a wall in my shop.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Enjoy the build Ian, I’m pulling up a seat. I Didn’t get which model you’re doing Ian?
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 06-07-2022 at 02:35 AM.

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Ian, you're the epitome of the phrase "You can't keep a good man down".
    Will be following along and enjoying the process of you building one of these fine looking craft.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Party On, Ian!!! You are an inspiration.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    You can stop building boats any time you want to - you just choose not to.
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, guys. Good to have you along for the ride.
    It's the HV13, Andrew. I see that wasn't very clear.
    I enjoyed your book, Alex.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #8
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Clear as water Ian , just west islanders can’t read.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Guys,
    I haven't been entirely idle, just a bit slow with the postings.

    I made the moulds out of my Kotik moulds, but the pieces weren't all big enough to take them down to the baseline, so I had to add bits on, which increased the chances of slight inaccuracies. I had to do a bit of shimming up here and there to get them all to line up on the waterlines properly. I did this before I had screwed the posts to the cross-beams.

    Here is the set-up.

    View from for'ard.
    P1040114.jpg

    View from aft.
    P1040113.jpg

    I made a cardboard pattern of the stern profile from the lofting,
    P1040116.jpg

    and set up the support for the transom. (The tops of the uprights will be sawn off in due course.)
    P1040121.jpg

    This is Ye Olde Nail Trick for making the stem pattern from the lofting, including the rabbet, middle and bearding lines.
    P1040068.jpg

    (to be continued.)

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #10
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    And here is the cardboard stem pattern propped up to establish its correct position, to leave enough length on the top of the real one when I make it, to attach it directly to the building frame. I intend to leave the knuckle at the forefoot. Others have rounded it off a bit.
    P1040122.jpg

    Now, to change the subject, I would like to use macrocarpa (cypress) for the planking, which I can get just down the road, but I have read that it can't be steamed, and the forward ends of the first three planks will need to be steamed to get the twist in them. So, I rigged up a couple of my primitive steaming devices,
    P1040069.jpg

    trimmed a piece of macrocarpa to 9mm (3/8") thick, and steamed it for half an hour. It came out like this:
    Tied to one of my old moulds, overnight:
    P1040072.jpg

    and untied.
    P1040073.jpg

    I will do some more experimenting....

    I've got an old oak bed-end (the last of four) for the transom. I will have to buy something for the stem, but will practise cutting a rabbet (rebate) on some scrap stuff first.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-05-2022 at 05:18 AM.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #11
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Very hard to imagine you idle Ian.
    Getting along well Ian. Geez that stem/nail pattern is busy! I bet you’re feeling great with how much room you have to move in the shed for this build. I’d call that success for the steaming. A twist with a bit of bend may be telling?
    Connie, her Mum and I are in Italy for 2 1/2 months trying to sell their family home (on the foothills of Etna) but wading through the bureauocacy (?) is like swimming up the rapids. Long story. It’s looking like we’ll have to go back again to finish the task.
    looking forward to your next instalment. Thanks for posting.
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 07-02-2022 at 08:43 AM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Looking forward to following along Ian. Very much enjoyed your build of Kotic, though I must say you are making all of younger men look lazy! Hard to stop doing what we love, isn't it? And what's not to love about making shavings and having something beautiful to enjoy at the end? You've set the bar high, we'll be watching!

    Ken
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Andrew. I wondered if you were still over there in Sicily, Andrew. Gee, living anywhere near Mt Etna must be a bit nervous-making. I suppose the locals get used to the idea. I hope you can sell the house soon, and have a good trip back.
    Thanks for the encouragement about the steaming. I'll steam another piece of macrocarpa and see if I can twist it.
    There is just the Feather Pram in the workshop now, with a tarp. over it. It's been finished for a year but we haven't even launched it yet! We'll wait for warmer weather for that. Building it was good experience for what I'm doing now.

    Thanks, Ken. Glad you enjoyed Kotik. What you say is very true. I always like having a boat on the stocks, and then being able to use it. Nice Tammie Norrie you have coming along. No pressure.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #14
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Re the steaming of macrocarpa. I understand what is marketed as "macrocarpa" in your part of the country often includes a small percentage of lawsons cypress (ie port orford cedar) which I think is steamable. Here in the Auckland area "macrocarpa" often includes lusitanica (mexican cypress). Lawsons cypress has a rather pronounced peppery smell, suggest you take several samples from different batches, see if you can detect a difference in smell, then try the steaming exercise again.

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks for that advice, Graeme. Good to hear from a NZer. The macrocarpa I get is all from the same yard, which has a large barn full of sawn stuff to the standard sizes. I haven't been there yet about this boat, but I will ask about those other varieties. What I have used has a pleasant sweet smell, is nice to work with, and looks like kauri. It is my default softwood, for deck framing and other things. I am assuming that it is cupressus macrocarpa, aka (to some) Monterey cypress. I will have another go at steaming some tomorrow. I have the book "New Zealand Timbers", by N.C. Clifton, which is an excellent reference. He lists those other kinds too.
    Regards,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-05-2022 at 05:16 AM. Reason: sp.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #16
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    I converted my Hvalsoe 13 plans to glued lap after receiving Eric's blessing to do so.
    I'll be interested in seeing it go together in the traditional way.
    It's been a long time since this forum saw copper rivets/screws being used to hold a boat together.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Lawsons cypress is not a cupressus species (lusitanica is), its botanical name is chamaecyparis lawsoniana but is very similar in appearance and characteristics to the other two, but perhaps it can be steamed. I have not heard any restriction on steaming Alaskan Yellow Cedar which is also a chamaecyparis species (nootka in this case), so perhaps lawsons is also steamable.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Rich, Your HV13 thread is the one that got me interested in Eric's boats. I see you have built other boats the traditional way, too. You could say that epoxy/plywood is in the tradition of using available materials, which is very sensible, but it's always good to try something different. I located a piece of elm today, to make the stem, stem and transom knees and the skeg out of. It would be easier, but not as interesting, to just buy some plywood and a bottle of epoxy.

    Thanks for your interest, Graeme. I daresay that by the time I am ready to start planking I will have found something suitable. If all else fails, I can get imported Western Red Cedar from Christchurch easily enough. That's what Eric uses, and he steams it where necessary.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #19
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    My attitude is that the moisture content of the planking stock, whatever species, in particular regarding steaming, is the difference between a pleasurable experience and a battle. I also stay away from flat grain planking stock. For most folks these are significant challenges.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    I seem to have been silent again for a while. I am no longer getting emails to tell me when there is a posting on one of my subscribed threads. Don't know why. I have just been checking some of them.

    Thanks for your message, Eric. Do you mean that the planking stock should be quarter sawn, with a high moisture content for steaming?

    I am still puzzling over what sort of timber to use for the planking. NZ Kauri or Western Red Cedar are the traditional timbers of choice, depending on where you live, but I would like to use something more locally available if possible. I have spent a lot of time making enquiries and reading whatever I can find about timbers, indigenous and exotic, learning a lot and also how much I don't know. Southern silver beech (Nothofagus menziesii) or poplar (variety unspecified) have been suggested. A piece of poplar steamed very well, and beech is listed as doing the same. Experiments continue... Comments, anybody?

    I have made a little bit of real progress lately. I traced a paper pattern for the skeg from the lofting and transferred the lines onto my piece of elm with carbon paper, and drew around my cardboard stem and knees patterns onto it in the most economical arrangement, and cut them out. The elm was 200 x 50mm (2 x 8"; 8 x 2") so I ended up with a 20 litre bucket of planer chips, after I had taken it down to the specified 38mm (1 1/2").
    P1040145.jpg

    The nice piece of imported Oregon (D. fir) at the back of the photo was left over from my Kotik masts and spars. I was going to use it for the keelson, but it is a little bit too narrow, so I will use it for the keel and get a piece of 150 x 25mm (6 x 2") macrocarpa for the keelson, so that I can keep to your intentions, Eric, of having her sit level on the beach. The bilge runners will help there too.

    The next jobs will be to cut the rabbets in the stem and make the transom.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-17-2022 at 04:49 AM. Reason: sp.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  21. #21
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    And here is what has taken up most of the last couple of days.

    Once upon a time there was an English oak tree (Quercus robur) on my next-door neighbour's place. About three years ago he told me that he was going to get rid of it because the leaves were too messy, it was too shady, etc., so I said, kind of impulsively, "Oh, can I have some of it?" (for dinghy frames), so the upshot was that a friend of his just took the head off, I collected some of the curved bits for knees (maybe) and we left the trunk standing, to be cut when the sap was down and near the time when I was ready to steam it green, which was very obliging of my neighbour.

    So, in due course I located a suitable tree company and they told me on Thursday that they could cut it down on Friday afternoon, so in the morning I took out part of the 6 foot (1.8m) fence, the work was done in the afternoon, and I put the fence back together again. (The fence had replaced my neighbour's macrocarpa hedge, two years ago. It is "Colour-steel", with the panels screwed to the rails (his choice), so it was fairly easy.)

    The trunk, as it was.
    P1040024.jpg

    The scene on Friday.
    P1040146.jpg

    I didn't know there would be so much sapwood in it, which I can't use. I got the guys to cut most of it off, for my neighbour's next year's firewood.
    P1040147.jpg

    And here it is on my trailer, with the sapwood pile in the background.
    P1040148.jpg

    I will take it to a sawmill tomorrow to see if it can be milled into planks I can turn into decent frames, or if it is only good for firewood.

    (It would be much easier to make the frames out of kwila decking planks!)

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-17-2022 at 04:02 AM. Reason: sp.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #22
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    The other thing that happened this week was the arrival of 4 lb of copper clenching nails from an ancient machine at the Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New
    Hampshire. https://www.piperboatworks.com/clench-nails.html. Our class was using these at the WoodenBoat School in 2015.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #23
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Amazing machine , I can only begin to imagine the mind of the person that thinks up such a contraption, genius.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Andrew. I was thinking the same thing when I watched it again just now.
    Are you home yet?
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Home on Wednesday. Can’t wait for some cold weather, most days are over 30 C here quite often 35+. Prob a week and I’ll be whinging about the cold, also glue won’t go off.

    We didn’t get far with selling the house over here, so Connie has to go back in a month or two to hopefully finalise. We got about half way with the necessary paperwork. Because her sister flat out refuses to fly to Sicily it makes things much more difficult amongst other things, long story.

    Im on the downhill side of the mountain with my boat so it’ll be good to start knocking off a few more jobs from the never ending list.

    how do you use those nails? With roves inside or curled over and back into timber. There’s a mob in Qland that sells copper nails and roves, let me know if you want their name.
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 07-17-2022 at 06:26 AM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Ian,

    Watching that large mass of moving parts making such a small product is quite fascinating.

    Seems like you have a few decisions to make regarding the planking on your new build.
    My experience with a variety of timbers in the steaming department is somewhat limited, more of a laminating guy myself.
    The Macrocarpa I have used over the years has always been a bit knotty, it does have a reputation for being a good boat building timber, if you can get the needed amount of clear boards.
    Beech is nice to work with, though it too can be a bit inconsistent in bulk with it's grain structure. Read somewhere that it does steam well.
    If you could get your hands on enough Kauri that would be my choice but getting it at the right price is the thing.
    The option of the Western Red Cedar is one to seriously consider. The fact that someone else will be picking out the boards may warrant some strict instruction on grain orientation.
    I like cedar, easy to work with, long straight grains and it smells nice too.
    Well, this little blurb has probably not helped with your decision making one bit but it's good to be social.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Andrew. Yes, it will be good to get home again. We are getting TV News reports about the heatwaves and wild fires in Europe. It's a pity that Connie will have to go back. Have a good trip home.
    The clenching nails are hammered through drilled holes onto a clenching iron which is skilfully (I hope) used to curl the point back into the wood. You have to practise a bit first. I will be using rivets too but I can get them in NZ easily enough. Thanks for the suggestion.

    Hi Mike, Thanks for considering my problem. It wouldn't be a problem if i just pressed a few buttons and ordered kauri or cedar, red or yellow, from the dealers in Christchurch, except maybe the price, as you say. A recent friend who knows his timbers is going to Southland tomorrow and will bring me back a piece of fresh silver beech from there next week, to experiment with. It will be from the one remaining sawmill at Tuatapere, operating in a certified sustainable fashion. Do you use quarter-sawn boards for the planking? (I suppose I should know that by now.) I can still go ahead with setting up the centreline.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #28
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    That video is indeed fascinating!

    Ken
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Do you have to pre drill for those nails?

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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Yes, you drill the holes first, a bit smaller than the nail. There are lots of videos about it, some better than others. The point has to be curled back into the wood, not just hammered flat. Another way to do it is with pliers.
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #31
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi Ian
    How did I miss this?
    I´ll be watching with pleasure!
    Cheers
    Max

  32. #32
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    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    It's a pleasure to have you on board, Max!

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #33
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    927

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Quote #27 "Hi Mike, Thanks for considering my problem. It wouldn't be a problem if i just pressed a few buttons and ordered kauri or cedar, red or yellow, from the dealers in Christchurch,..." It's Malaysian kauri they advertise, not NZ kauri. Nobody advertises NZ kauri any more, except swamp kauri (q.v.), which is a different situation entirely.

    I sawed and dressed an old piece of Southern Silver Beech (N. menziesii) into three strips 40 x 9mm and steamed them in a bunch for an hour, with the following results:

    One piece twisted to 90 degrees, representing the forefoot, and one bent around the second mould, representing a frame. (There is a bit of a bump in it.)
    P1040153.jpg

    And the other one bent around the aftermost mould. This is the tightest bend.
    P1040151.jpg

    So far, so good. I hope to get a fresh piece of beech, and a piece of macrocarpa, tomorrow, and then do the same with them.

    I will drill clamping holes around the moulds when I get my planking lines.

    I have been working on the keel plank, and hope to get a plank of macrocarpa tomorrow for the keelson, which is the same shape as the keel but 3/4" (19mm) wider all around. These two pieces form the rabbet for the garboard, with rolling bevels taken from the lofting.

    I will not be using that oak for the frames after all, as I have heard a horror story about NZ-grown oak frames cracking across in the bilges. John Leather, in his book "Clinker Boatbuilding", says English-grown oak frames in small dimensions are prone to doing that too. Maybe I'll use kwila.

    Big decisions expected this week!

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-24-2022 at 05:56 PM.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  34. #34
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Looking good Ian
    Isn´t it nice to travel new ways of building?
    That wooden species you mention I´ve never heard of in my place. Well I now Kauri at least.
    Have you tried to steam bend with a compression strap? Easily made out of a strip of sheet metal and some stopper blocks at the end.
    That and putting the ribs under water for 2-3 weeks can make bending a complete different story.
    I did a bending session a while ago with some folks to show the difference. All were pretty impressed.
    Cheers
    Max

  35. #35
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    About traditional planking stock during the build and for the life of the boat, like this one - I hold two seemingly contradictory elements in high regard - high moisture content and dimensional stability. I'm big on dimensional stability (therefore something like flat sawn oak has no place on one of my boats). In my corner of the world fresh cut vertical grain old growth western red cedar, surfaced to finish thickness, has both the moisture content I want and the dimensional stability to cause no problems during and after the build. Of course some folks regard harvesting this old growth a crime, and I can't entirely dismiss that sentiment. No clue about species for planking in your part of the world Ian. Typically I use 'bending oak' (green, clear, straight grain white oak) for steam bent ribs - not something found at the neighborhood lumberyard - but I have also use locust. I don't recall the moisture content of the locust. No idea how or why you would turn clench nails 'with pliers'. Building upside down the plank laps are clenched in the frame bays solo and blind. If you rib the boat out right side up after planking, clenching the ribs is more of a two person operation.

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