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Thread: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

  1. #71
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Just be aware Alex, that is the glue that foams when it has a gap to expand into or out of. The expanded foamy residue doesn’t have much strength so your wood needs to be a good fit. I used it on my laminated deck beams and it has worked well. But those strips were planed smooth to fit together well. I damped down the wood a little to aid curing.
    Thanks Andrew. I must have used a similar thing when I did the foils for Wood Duck - that was a foaming polyurethane glue called Purbond, made by Bote-Cote (Boatcraft Pacific). (I wrapped them in glass and coated them with West 105/207 then Norglass clear marine enamel.) The staves were glued together as machined (also from Boatcraft), very smooth finish.
    You can never have too many clamps

  2. #72
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Progress has been slow lately.

    I steamed some more samples of macrocarpa and silver beech. When I tried to twist a piece of macrocarpa at the forefoot it split, but the silver beech took it very well, as shown here, so I will see about getting that for the planking. I have enough elm for the frames, and will get some macrocarpa for the thwarts when I'm ready.
    P1040206.jpg

    Here is the stem rabbet, with the knee fitted. The relevant measurements match the lofting, but the angle of the stem is slightly different, so
    the knee needed some trimming, which is a bit of a puzzle.
    P1040211.jpg

    The transom knee fitted better.
    P1040213.jpg

    I cut my last oak bed-end into its three boards along the joint lines (as I don't suppose the original glue was waterproof), added the last piece of the previous one, and glued all four together with epoxy splined joints.
    P1040215.jpg

    The next day, I ground the corners off the blade of one of my planes, sharpened it up, and planed the whole thing flat on both sides, working across the grain first and then along it, which came out pretty well.
    P1040221.jpg

    I have also been studying all my books again for what sort of glues and sealants to use, and they all say different things, sometimes in brand names which you don't get here. Epoxy for the transom joints is used by Will Stirling in "Details of Dinghy Building", who also uses Gorilla glue in the hood-ends and the garboard-to-keelson seams before he puts the fastenings in. Ian Hugh Smith in "Wooden Boatbuilding - The Sydney Wooden Boat School Manuals" uses a bead of "low modulus polyurethane" (e.g., Sikaflex 291) in the ends and laps, making a seal but allowing the wood to move. As I will be using clenched nails for the planking, I think I have abandoned the idea of being able to take any part out and replace it easily, and I don't want to have to soak the boat in the sea to make it watertight.

    That will do for now....

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-28-2022 at 06:10 PM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #73
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    That will do very well. I'm off to WBS today. Best to you two.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Not so good that the macrocarpa split, but great that the southern beech is a goer for the planks. I’m really interested to see how the beech turns out. Good to see the (last of the) old bedstead(s) being usefully repurposed.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  5. #75
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks for that affirmation, Thad. Good to hear from you. All the best for your class, from both of us.

    Hi Alex, Macrocarpa is described as a good boatbuilding timber except that it cannot be steam-bent, or words to that effect, as with other softwoods (except cedar, apparently). I got some bending out of it, but I was pushing my luck a bit there. Southern silver beech, according to my timber book, "has been used extensively for motor body building, due to its excellent steam bending properties", so there you are. (I don't know what sort of motor bodies. They must have been the old ones.) I could probably get kauri, at great expense, but that's not necessary. Ian Hugh Smith (mentioned above) lists various Australian boatbuilding timbers under names such as "silver ash" and "white beech" which are really eucalyptus species. Your "spotted gum" has been used a lot in New Zealand for steamed frames. (In New Zealand we describe eucalypts by their Latin names, to avoid confusion.) You also have those wonderful Tasmanian "pines", which we don't get here.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #76
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    By geez Ian, all the boats you’ve built over the years worth of experience seems to have come to nought with this boat. You’ve certainly started a new curve of learning it seems. I hope you have some luck with the timber steaming soon. Best of luck.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Must be an optical illusion, somehow the beech trial plank looks fatter than 3/8"!
    What I tend do albeit with different lumber species:
    Bond and fasten keel to apron with epoxy (gorilla glue is plausable for this although I seldom use it now for anything)
    Bond together stem and stem knee with epoxy
    For pretty much everything else I use Boatlife Lifecaulk which is a polysulfide and stupidly expensive. This includes stem knee to apron, and transom knee to apron and transom. The idea being these are discreet lumber parts that will move in different directions, therefore not to bonded with epoxy. Maybe, maybe not - but look at your transom. Oak. Does not appear to be vertical grain, it's going to move, the knee is not going to move with it.

    I bed the garboards, hood ends, gains, and in fact the plank laps with boatlife - the length of the lap merely a tidy bead set in a shallow grove cut with an oval rasp. Not epoxy, not gorrilla glue, not 5200. How dimensionally stable is the beech? Real old school would be some kind of oil based bedding compound but that's a little too old school for me in this application. You don't have to use boatlife. Although really really messy, Sika 291 (polyurethane) would be a step up in permanence while allowing some movement. I'm sure 3M makes something comparable, maybe 4200, to list just a couple of options. If you do bed the laps, there is no room for error. The seal must be unbroken, or risk permanent weeping, or a retro exterior sika job, to insure a dry hull.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    You're right there, Andrew. I wouldn't say "Come to nought" exactly, but this is the first boat I have built with a rabbeted stem and a lofted transom, and I am certainly learning a lot about timbers that might be suitable and available. Plywood and epoxy would be much easier. I know how to do that! Anyway, once I get this centreline under control most of the rest will be pretty similar to what I've done before.

    Thanks for all that, Eric. I haven't decided which sealant to use yet. Sikaflex 291 is one possibilty. It needs to be a flexible sealant, not so much an adhesive. Greg Rossel in his book makes a small groove along the lower edge of each lap, after the planking is done, and puts a bead of sealant along it, as you suggest.
    I take your point about the oak moving. I'll have a think about that. Those bed-ends are at least 40 years old, probably older. I have used parts of them for my other boats.

    Ian

    EDIT: I meant to say, the sample piece of beech in the above photo was dressed to 9mm (3/8"). Perhaps it looks thicker because it is relatively narrow.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-29-2022 at 04:19 PM. Reason: Add "EDIT".
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #79
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    In the last few days I have lined out the hull for the planking, using the marks for nine planks that Eric gives on his full-size detail sheet for the HV16 at station 6 and the stem. From the marks on station 6, I calculated sets for stations 2 and 11, by a bit of school algebra. The battens are off-cuts from earlier boats. They are 3/4" (19mm) wide, except the garboard one. When I brought them through to the stem I had to release them from stn 2 to let them find their own lines there. They might need a little bit more adjustment yet.

    P1040234.jpg

    P1040235.jpg

    P1040236.jpg

    Then I made a dummy plank, 8" (200mm) wide, out of some scruffy old plywood, to see what I could get out of one that size, which turned out to be the garboard and broadstrake. Then I cut it down to 6" (150mm) and found that I could get the rest out of that size, but four of them will have to be dog-leg scarfed. I might get a 8" one for the sheer strake anyway.

    P1040238.jpg

    P1040239.jpg

    I have not made the transom yet, but have done the lining out now to work out the quantities, because we are going away tomorrow, first to Riverton on Friday to rig the boat for the Southland Trailer Yacht Squadron's Opening Day of the Season, on Saturday, but we won't be racing like most of them do. We'll just go for a bit of a cruise. On Monday I have arranged to meet the Operations Manager of the "Lindsay and Dixon" sawmill at Tuatapere about silver beech for dinghy planking, so we will see what that leads to. The first question is does anybody use it for that, and the second question is can they saw it to 1/2" (12mm) thick.

    After that we will go to Lake Manapouri for a few days. It will be good to have a break as we have had big roadworks going on right outside our place since April. They have just got one layer of asphalt to put on it now.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 09-07-2022 at 04:57 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #80
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Those battens look perfect. It's an art to get that right.
    I've spent many an hour lining off planks for my glued lap boats.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.
    Skiing is the next best thing to having wings.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    The line off is close. In the bow I look for a relatively wide garboard and sheer, and 'apparently' even spacing in between. In case folks don't know, the wide garboard hood end will minimize the width of stock required for the remaining planks. The sharp toe exaggerates the width. At the transom the garboard is tucking up to a moderate width, you might expect the spacing to narrow a bit around the turn, than widen again at the sheer. Between garboard and sheer plank, very gradual increments. My line off technique is to start with the midship mold which is a matter of spacing nine 3/8" planks around the circumference in pleasing proportion, without getting too thin on the laps and without dubbing the mold. Run battens out to an attractive spacing at stem and transom. In between I'm really just letting them fly, then stand back and nudge this way and that.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Lining-off is both exhilarating and nerve wracking at the same time. Much like many of the best experiences in life.

    Jeff

  13. #83
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, guys. The battens are not fastened to the transom pattern at all so far, because it's only cardboard. When I've got the real one on, I'll adjust the battens a bit.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #84
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Cool, Ian.
    The shape of things to come.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  15. #85
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Looking beautiful. It's amazing what a difference the simple addition of few lines makes in 3D. Good luck with the beech, and have a great trip .

    PS, what sort or wood did you use for the battens?
    Last edited by Alex1N; 09-09-2022 at 08:03 AM. Reason: Added batten query
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  16. #86
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Alex and Mike.

    Alex, the battens are macrocarpa, except for the top (garboard) one, which is Oregon. I didn't make them specially, they are all off-cuts from previous work.

    I have been spending a lot of time investigating suitable planking timbers. We have been away for ten days, with Kotik. On Saturday 10th September we were at Riverton, on the south coast, for the opening day of the season of the Southland Trailer Yacht Squadron. We went out and took photos of the others racing in the bay. There were three yachts and three races, and they won one each. On Monday 12th I visited the saw- mill at Tuatapere to investigate silver beech, as I had arranged. After that we went up to Lake Manapouri for a short cruise, and came home on Saturday 17th. The weather was nice but cold most of the time, with the lake flat calm and plenty of snow on the mountains. (See my "Kotik,Kotik,Kotik!" thread.) I have also spoken with a couple of acquaintances who used to be commercial wooden boatbuilders and fishermen in the south of NZ and are now marine surveyors, who thought I should use kauri, being the "tried and true" NZ boatbuilding timber. They didn't know of beech having been used at all, which surprised me a little. I was advised to try a shipbuilding firm at Lyttelton (the port for Christchurch), which I have done since we came home, and have now ordered kauri from them. It is more expensive than beech, but a lot less than imported western red cedar. Beech was a close contender. Maybe I'll use it next time, if there is a next time. Decisions, decisions.....

    Anyway, before ordering the timber, I made wallpaper patterns of the planking from the line-out battens, and worked out where the dog-leg scarfs would have to be, so that I didn't have to order every piece at the full length and then cut most of them. I am using nine strakes. The company is going to dress them on both faces to a finished thickness of 9mm (3/8"), so here is my order:

    Size (mm) ..................Length (mm) ............Quantity ...............Total length

    200 x 9 ............................3900........ .............2 ..........................7800
    .........................................4500 .....................2 ..........................9000
    .................................................. .................................................. ...........................16800
    150 x 9 ............................1500........... .........2 ...........................3000
    .........................................1800..... ................4 ..........................7200
    .........................................2100 ....................4 ..........................8400
    .........................................2400 ..................12 ........................28800
    .........................................2700..... ... ............2 ..........................5400
    .........................................4500 ....................2.......................... 9000
    .................................................. .................................................. ...........................61800
    That's 30 pieces in all.

    (NZ metric conversions for building materials are 25mm = 1 inch, 300mm = 1 foot, e.g. 3000mm (3.0m) = 10ft.

    This is the blank for pattern no. 6.
    P1040396.jpg

    The patterns laid out flat:
    P1040403.jpg

    The positions of the scarfs, worked out by placing each pattern over that dummy plywood plank.
    P1040404.jpg

    The 200mm (8") boards are for the garboards and sheerstrake. The rest are 150mm (6").

    I have also joined up the keel and stem rabbet around the forefoot. It still needs cleaning up a little.
    P1040392.jpg

    A friend from the Picton Clinker Club visited us recently. He took one look at the forefoot and said, "That looks very Scandinavian".

    Cheers,
    Ian


    Last edited by IanMilne; 09-25-2022 at 07:15 PM. Reason: Respace the table. It almost worked.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  17. #87
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    And this weekend I have made the transom, out of that old bed-end. I drew the inside face of the transom around the cardboard pattern onto the bed-end, then cut the pattern down to the outside line (which is smaller), carefully lined it up on the other side of the bed-end and drew the outside shape. Then I cut out the transom on my bandsaw to the inside line, clamped it to the bench, and cut the bevel. I have seen a demonstartion at Port Townsend of cutting the rolling bevel by two guys on a big bandsaw, but the way I did it wasn't too difficult.

    I made saw cuts across the transom edges between the inner and outer lines and worked the edges down, mainly with draw-knife and block plane, until the saw cuts disappeared.
    P1040417.jpg

    P1040418.jpg

    Then I tried it in place, just sitting on a couple of nails at this stage. The bevels will need adjusting a little, along with a general tidy up of the whole thing.
    P1040419.jpg

    It will be good to be able to get on with the planking, even with a few interruptions for summer sailing trips!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #88
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Very interesting (and useful for neophytes like myself). Thanks for the comment on the batten material - I’ll try and find some clear, flatsawn radiata pine of suitable length. I only need enough for or two battens, not the extent to which you’ve gone on your HV13. They just have to work without kinks.

    Lovely transom.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-21-2022 at 12:50 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  19. #89
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    It must be a relief to have your timber sorted and the transom looks really good. I can’t imagine what a workout your tape measure is getting!!! I’ve gone and bought a Moto Guzzi so it’ll be a distraction along with my laziness to getting work done on Margaret.

    00B5EDFE-D543-4709-9C63-D35BD2586B63.jpg

  20. #90
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Transom looks great. Your readers should appreciate the fact that the bevel is significant - rolling to more than 40 degrees.
    Very exciting you are using Kauri. Even here, for some of us it is a legendary timber. We don't see it, except for the occasional musical instrument, as I imagine export is banned. Remember there is the species, and there is the cut.

    The patterns are good for ball parking the planking material. You will of course be individually patterning the planking strake by strake beginning with the garboard. No doubt your thread will get into this. I spile, meaning I use dividers to lay out the plank pattern. An important distinction between carvel planking and lapstrake is that the spiling batten should sit up on the previous lap. The pitch of the plank and of a spiling batten - the way one edge sits on the mold and the other edge up on the previous lap - affects it's shape. Underestimate this effect at your peril. It would matter less with thinner planking, 3/8" over these nine strakes it does make a difference. Edgeset is something to avoid for the most part, much more so than with carvel planking.
    E
    Last edited by Eric Hvalsoe; 09-26-2022 at 10:00 AM.

  21. #91
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    What Eric said about edge set for planking of this thickness on a boat this size. I learned the hard way that there is a significant difference between the actual final shape that 9mm thick plank takes compared to a pattern made from thinner material, even when that pattern is taken directly from the stock laid over the previous plank and the next batten.
    Alex

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    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  22. #92
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    Post Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, all of you.

    Alex (1N), The length of my battens is just what they were. I didn't see any need to cut them shorter. The width of them happens to be 3/4" (19 or 20mm) and the thickness about 6mm but slightly variable. If I had been making them I would have made them 19 x 9mm (plank lap width by planking thickness), but they are serving the present purpose well enough.

    Hi Andrew, Don't get too carried away on that impressive looking Italian motorbike!
    The new roundabout outside our place was finished last Thursday. It is working well.

    Eric and Alex (Z). Thanks for that good advice. It's all perfectly true. Yes, I will be spiling the planks individually, one by one. My favourite method is by compass arcs, as very well illustrated by Sam Manning in "The Dory Book" by John Gardner. I also use "direction and distance" lines and a spiling block when appropriate. I will be making proper patterns out of 3mm MDF.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #93
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Kauri planks Ian...nice...the creme de la creme.
    Surprised to read that the cedar was more expensive, import duties and all that I suppose.
    Transom looks great, I have a few oak bed ends stashed away, could be the incentive for a new build...one day.
    Looking forward to watching the planks go on.
    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  24. #94
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    What Eric said about edge set for planking of this thickness on a boat this size. I learned the hard way that there is a significant difference between the final shape that 9mm thick plank takes compared to a pattern made from thinner material, even when that pattern is taken directly from the stock laid over the previous plank and the next batten.
    Alex, that's not exactly what I said. I'll use 1/4" ply and sometimes something a little thinner into the stem rabbet to take the twist of the first couple of planks, for spiling material. Slightly thinner material is not a problem. Are you saying you layed your pattern material over the lap and the next line off batten below the lap? As in, a line off batten standing proud of the mold? Maybe you meant a batten let in flush to the molds. if the former, you were introducing edgeset every time because one edge of the pattern was not laying on the mold, preferably pretty damn close to the line off mark - as the plank would be. That's what I meant by pitch. Different pitch raises or lowers the plank ends. Wrong shape, edgeset, typically resulting in the planks growing away from the molds. But maybe I misunderstand what you are describing.

    Edit to add: Thinking you probably had your line off battens notched into the molds. Maybe you were scribing off them. If not, what I said before. I agree that really thin spiling material is less than optimum. More difficult to get a good sense of 'ironing it out', keeping edgeset out of the picture.
    E
    Last edited by Eric Hvalsoe; 09-27-2022 at 01:26 AM.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi guys,

    Yes, I understand what you are saying, Eric, about edge set and "pitch". Thanks for the discussion, AlexZ.

    Sorry, but there is nothing dramatic to add since last time. In eyeing along the battens I found a hollow over mould eleven,so I released the battens from that mould and let them take their own line. Then I made a pattern across them with 3mm MDF and cut out a pair of packing pieces to screw to the mould. You can see them here:

    Attachment 120750

    This is how I made the pattern:
    Attachment 120749

    And here is a better view:
    Attachment 120751

    After that I marked the lap lines on the side where the battens were and made saw-cuts into the moulds, and measured them onto the other side.
    This shows measuring the planking positions on each mould. I did it in inches and eighths. I put nails into each mould up against each side of the keelson, and hung one of my wife's dressmaking tape measures on them to measure and transfer the spacings.
    Attachment 120748

    I bought a cartridge of Sika 291 to use along the garboard seam when I get that for, and am also looking at Bostik Seal 'n' Flex. I didn't like the way my stem knee had turned out, so I made another one. I will glue the forefoot assembly together with epoxy, and have got bronze bolts for the forefoot and stern assemblies as shown on the HV16 plan. I will glue the transom knee to the keelson with epoxy but attach the transom to the knee with s.bronze wood-screws and flexible sealant. I still have to tidy up the rabbets. I put up some more shelves at our daughter's "Stitch Kitchen" place, and did some minor work on Kotik. So, some HV progress but not much to see.

    We are going away tomorrow for three weeks, cruising Kotik on Lakes Dunstan, Aviemore and Benmore with other club members. These are all hydro lakes. There are photos of them from other trips on my Kotik thread. The third weekend is our Labour Weekend, 22 - 24 October. My kauri order should be ready to pick up after that.

    'Bye for now.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 10-05-2022 at 05:55 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #96
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Can’t see pictures in #95 Ian, but I can in other posts up the page ????

  27. #97
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    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Sorry, Andrew. I'll have another go at it in the morning.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #98
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    Mar 2015
    Location
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Those photos showed up perfectly well in my draft. I had done it in "Post Quick Reply" instead of "Go Advanced" which I normally use, and am now. If I try to delete them and put them back in I'll probably get into a big mess, so I will put them in here:

    1. General view, after the job was done.
    P1040446.jpg

    2. Pattern making:
    P1040438.jpg

    3. A better view of the packing pieces:
    P1040447.jpg

    4. Measuring the plank spacings:
    P1040449.jpg

    5. For a bonus, here's a photo of Kotik about 8:30 this morning. We are having an unseasonal blast from the Antarctic, unprecedented in October. It is clearing now and will be fine tomorrow and for the weekend. We will have our lunch now and then leave on our trip, driving carefully!
    P1040453.jpg

    OK. That's my limit of five photos. They all look perfectly alright so far, as the usual thumbnails at this stage. Now they should come up properly in the submitted reply, like they usually do, and did last time. If they don't, I don't know why.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #99
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    4,990

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    The photos came through fine for me. And they show some gorgeous work

  30. #100
    Join Date
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    That's good, Hugh. Thanks for the encouragement!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #101
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    I see them now Ian. Setting up those planking battens looks like fun

    Lucky you’re not building an epoxy boat with that weather. Next you’ll get icebergs.

  32. #102
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    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Hi guys,
    We had a good trip with Kotik for most of October so visible progress on the dinghy has been nil. The firm in Christchurch was pleased to have three weeks to prepare the kauri for me, as they had a ship on the slipway. We were home from Lake Benmore for two days and then drove up to Christchurch to pick it up. Here it is on our common or garden trailer, at our friends' place. The overhang was just at the legal limit of 4m (13 ft) past the axle. (The wooden strut was not necessary.)
    P1040580.jpg

    And here it is safely on my bench at home. It is longer than I had ordered but they asked me if I would take it at that length for no extra charge, so of course I accepted. They said they had it for their boatbuilding purposes and it had been "in deep storage for many years". So now I have 16 planks at 20ft (6.1m) and 2 a bit shorter (which doesn't matter), at 200 x 9mm (8" x 3/8") dressed both sides. There might be enough for the floorboards, risers and inwales, and the thwarts if I make them in two layers, and some to practice steaming with.
    P1040583.jpg

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #103
    Join Date
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    891

    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Nice timber Ian, just the bees knees. You're going to have a bit of fun with that.
    Enjoyed reading about your trip too.

    Cheers, Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

    "Don't take life seriously. Either way, you won't make it out alive."

  34. #104
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Very sweet, Ian.

    You are a busy guy. Do you ever slow down?

    Jeff

  35. #105
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    Default Re: A Hvalsoe Dinghy in New Zealand

    Thanks, Mike and Jeff.
    Progress on this dinghy will continue to be slow over our summer, interrupted by such things as sailing trips!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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