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Thread: Doors

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Doors

    This past month I stripped down and varnished four doors in my almost 100 year old house.

    I posted a thread of photos in the Bilge:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-This-old-door

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post
    This past month I stripped down and varnished four doors in my almost 100 year old house.

    I posted a thread of photos in the Bilge:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-This-old-door

    I enjoyed reading your thread, twodot. I especially liked the way you handled the panels, painting them a nice shade of yellow. The paint you left on the corner was very cool, too.





    After the usual period of dithering I am pleased to have door number two underway. This door is similar in construction to the first but has a few more interesting complexities.

    One of these complexities is the diminished, or gunstock, stile. The stile thins out at the middle rail so the top of the door has a thinner stile than the bottom. This method is often used to give more glass area up to and to lighten up the overall look.


    In this photo you can see a portion of the lofting underneath. Uppermost is a plywood routing pattern for making the transition from wide to not-so-wide. Sandwiched between is the stile itself, with a saw cut run down as close to the transition as I dared. The finished diminish cut is penned in for visibility while removing most of the waste. The final cut will be done with a router guided by the template.



  3. #108
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    You're looking at the inside of the door here. The rebates that will hold the glass have just been cut with a router fitted with a large rabbeting bit. Next thing is to square the rebate corners with a chisel. The plan calls for mitered stops on this side to hold in the glass, which will allow for replacement of the pane in case of breakage.


    Have you made the rebates deep enough for double glazing units as well as your stops?
    It does look as though you have.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #109
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryLL View Post
    Oh, I'd probably just look at them for twenty years or so trying to decide where they belong.

    You have that problem too?
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  5. #110
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Have you made the rebates deep enough for double glazing units as well as your stops?
    It does look as though you have.

    It's a balancing act, Nick, as you know. I stopped where I did, leaving the possibility of going just a bit deeper, but I don't want to make the exterior reveal too small, all the while keeping enough room for the glass unit, stop and a small reveal inside. The insulating glass units will be a half inch thick the rest is variable, within the total inch and three quarters door thickness


    Here are the two stiles for the second door after routing in the diminishing part.



  6. #111
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    Default Re: Doors

    I've a cunning plan. This door has three rails, a top and bottom, and the middle rail which will fit against the diminished part of the stiles. The top and bottom rails have the same kind of tenons as the ones in the first door. The middle rail has to fit against the angled portion of the stile, which makes the cutting of the tenon shoulder slightly more involved.

    The plan is this...to fit the middle rail first, as it might involve some hand fitting at the end, and it might need some adjustment. Once it's fit it will establish the lengths of the top and bottom rail, which are simpler to fit.

    So, here it is going together, mortices bored in the stiles, the tenons started on the rail. The remaining waste to be removed is roughly marked out. Once it gets close it can be scribed on both sides.



  7. #112
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    Default Re: Doors

    Time to scribe in the joint.

    Okay, the joint has been worked so it's close to home but the shoulder needs final fitting. With the rail held square to the stile a line can be scratched along the top and bottom edge with a divider, keeping the same setting





    You can see here a knife-cut scratch along the face. This was done by clamping a steel rule on the face of the piece with it's edge lined up with the divider scratches in each edge. To line it up, put on your reading glasses, bring a lamp in close, and if you're like me, get out the magnifying glass to do the lining-up. Put a new blade in the utility knife and make a light cut along the ruler, followed by a heavier one.





    Chop out the waste near to the line and finish up with some light chisel cuts along the line.





    The first one needed some adjustment but this one is best left alone. And that, is the most difficult part of this door frame. The rest of the frame is more of what has been already been done.



  8. #113
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    Default Re: Doors

    Here are the stiles and rails dry fitted. The mortices for the window and panel muntins have been cut.

    The effect of the gunstock stiles becomes apparent here, opening up the top rectangle and creating some visual tension between the top and bottom openings. The three over two division ought to enhance the effect. We'll see.



  9. #114
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    Default

    Vari noyce!


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    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  10. #115
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Vari noyce!

    Thanks, Kevin.

    Here is all of the frame parts ready to clamp up. There needs to be a groove routed in for the lower panels and rabbets for the upper glass, as well as some edge treatment to lighten up the look a little bit.



  11. #116
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    Default Re: Doors

    Just. Wow.

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Here's our wolfs head door knocker. It was originally on the door of my houseboat, and more recently on Tracey's garden shed door. It'll look good cast in bronze. If I can mold it I can pour it, somebody must have done so the past. It's got a hollow back, which is good. It'll need some undercutting in the mold but that won't be too difficult. How about drilling a couple of small holes in the eyes with a red LED light behind?


    The eyes could. Iight up when people knock.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  13. #118
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    Default Re: Doors

    Thanks, Hugh.

    That's a good one, Gary.


    Here she is, standing up, dry fitted. It's been a lot of work to get this far, and still miles to go.



  14. #119
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    Default Re: Doors

    Nice Jim.
    The Bungalow style of house built here in New Zealand around the 1920's had doors of a very similar look to yours.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Nice Jim.
    The Bungalow style of house built here in New Zealand around the 1920's had doors of a very similar look to yours.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

    That's good to know, Mike, it's the sort of look I've been aiming for. I've long been a fan of your domestic architecture from that period, it's similar, in a way to some of the houses I've seen in northern California, but different in their own way.


    Now, while the frame is together, it's time for some routing. needed to hold the lower panels and the upper glass. The two lower spaces need to be grooved to hold the panels. The upper three rectangles need to be rabbeted to hold the glass, similar to the other door.

    And here it is, mission accomplished. One point I'd like to make about doing routings like this is to take your time and do it in small increments, say, 1/16" passes or maybe a little more, but not much. These were done with a three HP plunge router, which could take a bigger bite, but that increases the force you're dealing with and increases the chance of wood tearing out. The first and last passes should be especially fine, for this reason. Climb-cutting, moving the router the "wrong" way, gives a cleaner cut, but needs to be done with great care.

    And, finally, I'm going to paint the doors. Not an easy decision, but it's for the best. They're enough work as it is, and I do have a boat to finish.


  16. #121
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    Default Re: Doors

    Clean bench.



  17. #122
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    Default Re: Doors

    The routed rabbets need to have their corners squared. Between the two doors there was a number of these to do. Well, thirty-two in total.



  18. #123
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    Default Re: Doors

    The exterior side is going to get a stopped chamfer detail on the frame. These were routed in. The bottom example in the photo is a chamfer as routed. The ends are rounded due to the way the router cuts. The top piece is the chamfer after having the ends chiseled flat, which is a more finished look. The one on the left could be straightened up a little, but there's still time.



  19. #124
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    Default Re: Doors

    Gorgeous

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