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Thread: Doors

  1. #36
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    Somebody looks happy with the job, Jim, and that's what counts, smiles all around! Nice boat, too!


    Here we are...top and middle rail widened, some muntins put in, things are shaping up.


    You can see the nice effect provided by the diminished stiles, where the top section is lightened up while providing more glass area. There's a nice tension created with the three over two that just wouldn't happen if the stiles were the same width throughout.


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 04-12-2022 at 02:06 PM.

  2. #37
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    Here's our wolfs head door knocker. It was originally on the door of my houseboat, and more recently on Tracey's garden shed door. It'll look good cast in bronze. If I can mold it I can pour it, somebody must have done so the past. It's got a hollow back, which is good. It'll need some undercutting in the mold but that won't be too difficult. How about drilling a couple of small holes in the eyes with a red LED light behind?



  3. #38
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    Having secured the required sign-off and go-ahead from the client I'm able to make a cut list that I can have confidence in. Not quite enough confidence to actually make a cut, my hands are still trembling. Besides, late afternoon is the worst time to pick up a saw. Much better to sleep on it.






    In my ditherings, putterings, and pencil-sharpenings, however, I came across a freshly sharpened set of jointer blades which I had almost forgotten about. Now here's an excellent late-in-the-day activity...scrubbing the jointer bed of it's winter coat of rust. I'll put the blades in in the morning as this is another morning job, when the light is good and the vision somewhat less blurry.



  4. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Here's our wolfs head door knocker. It was originally on the door of my houseboat, and more recently on Tracey's garden shed door. It'll look good cast in bronze. If I can mold it I can pour it, somebody must have done so the past. It's got a hollow back, which is good. It'll need some undercutting in the mold but that won't be too difficult. How about drilling a couple of small holes in the eyes with a red LED light behind?


    I like the lighting idea!
    You have to make the eyes light-up and blink when someone approaches the door...

    (looks more like a fox with a stolen chicken than a Woof , but I do like it)

  5. #40
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    I don’t know about red lit eyes Jim, but I could see a nice effect on the timber door with that wolf’s head set off the door @1/8” by a couple of washers and back lit with a warm white LED under it......
    Larks

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  6. #41
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    Drilling?

    I thought you were a mold maker, man?!

    The light up red eyes… you’ve been hanging around me TOO much.

  7. #42
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    Laddie, yer needs an anchor dawr knocker, ye does. Arrgh!


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    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I've made a couple of line drawings, but before I begin cutting I'm making some hot-glued patterns to check the fit and look. It's a simple design, which, I think, is what the situation calls for. This door gets the thermopane units in all the spaces. The top will line up with the top of the windows so the trim follows the same line. There's not much to vary other than the width of the intermediate rails. The styles are sized to get two out of one plank, four and a half inches, or so.


    I think that the intermediate rails should respect the position of the joints in the weatherboarding.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I think that the intermediate rails should respect the position of the joints in the weatherboarding.

    Hi, Nick. By weatherboarding I assume you mean the joints in the concrete blocks. I don't think that that would be possible, there would be four big windows and a small one on top. Remember that the door will be set back in the frame to line up with the inside wall, unlike here where the template is propped up and is too big to fit into the opening. The position of the bottom of the door is fixed, the height of the top is such that the top of the door frame coincides with the top of the window frame, so that the interior trim lines up. The glass spaces have to be equal, the width of the bottom rail can't be any wider. You're asking too much here.

    Jim

  10. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Laddie, yer needs an anchor dawr knocker, ye does. Arrgh!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

    I like it! Or, how about a hammer, Kevin! A wee brass hammer hinged to tap on a bolt head.

    Jim

  11. #46
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    Here are most of the parts, face and edged. Even with those nice boards there's a lot to think about when laying out the pieces to be cut. There's end checks, sapwood, and worm holes to be cut around Rough sawn timber, even it's quite flat, has some parts that are flatter than others. This wouldn't matter if there was a quarter inch or more thickness to play with, but I've only got an eighth over, so laying out the long pieces needs to be done with care. And then there's the grain, with a bright finish you have to imagine the position of the parts in the door because the overall finished appearance can be enhance or spoiled by the choices made here. And so on, I'm sure you get the picture.

    Jim



  12. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Here's our wolfs head door knocker. It was originally on the door of my houseboat, and more recently on Tracey's garden shed door. It'll look good cast in bronze. If I can mold it I can pour it, somebody must have done so the past. It's got a hollow back, which is good. It'll need some undercutting in the mold but that won't be too difficult. How about drilling a couple of small holes in the eyes with a red LED light behind?



    Jim, maybe go one step further - and (perhaps for Halloween) , drill out the nostrils and rig up some model train capsule 'smoke' ?




    Rick
    Charter Member - - Professional Procrastinators Association of America - - putting things off since 1965 " I'll get around to it tomorrow, .... maybe "

  13. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Hi, Nick. By weatherboarding I assume you mean the joints in the concrete blocks. I don't think that that would be possible, there would be four big windows and a small one on top. Remember that the door will be set back in the frame to line up with the inside wall, unlike here where the template is propped up and is too big to fit into the opening. The position of the bottom of the door is fixed, the height of the top is such that the top of the door frame coincides with the top of the window frame, so that the interior trim lines up. The glass spaces have to be equal, the width of the bottom rail can't be any wider. You're asking too much here.

    Jim
    Well, it was just an idea.
    I have never seen blockwork like that in the UK. Hence, my confusion.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Well, it was just an idea.
    I have never seen blockwork like that in the UK. Hence, my confusion.
    That's a new siding for me also. Weird & interesting. And, of course it's always nice to give a handshake, or at least a nod, to existing structure, lines, colors, composition, rhythms if possible.

    But, for several reasons beyond the practical, I think the equal size glazing would be best. And the door, being its own composition (color, setback, etc.) should embrace that. The multiple, evenly spaced, rails already echoes the horizontal lines of the siding. I think that's enough. Looking forward to seeing how it looks in finished form.
    David G
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  15. #50
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    The brickwork reminds me of a long-ago visit to Scotland, Aberdeen specifically, not sure why. I think the style of work is known as :


    Red eyes in that knocker would be sweet. Sweeter yet if they turned green when you turn your key in the lock.
    Steve

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  16. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    The brickwork reminds me of a long-ago visit to Scotland, Aberdeen specifically, not sure why. I think the style of work is known as :

    A form of dressing stone for high staus buildings
    Ashlar masonry is a type of stone masonry which is formed using finely dressed stones of same size, shape, and texture laid together in cement or lime mortar of equal size joints at right angles to each other.
    The masonry built using ashlar stones is rectangular where cuboid blocks are laid in horizontal courses or layers. The joints between the stones are very thin, regular, and of uniform thickness, which make the ashlar masonry very strong and sturdy.
    Chamfering the edges of the masonry is just one style.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  17. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    I don’t know about red lit eyes Jim, but I could see a nice effect on the timber door with that wolf’s head set off the door @1/8” by a couple of washers and back lit with a warm white LED under it......

    That does sound nice there, Greg, but I do worry it might be a bit to welcoming. It's a slippery slope, yanno, folks start stopping by at odd times, the next thing you know they're inviting you to a barbeque next Sunday, and there goes your building time.


    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Jim, maybe go one step further - and (perhaps for Halloween) , drill out the nostrils and rig up some model train capsule 'smoke' ?

    Rick

    Yer gettin' real "Addams Family", there ,Rick. I like it!


    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Well, it was just an idea.
    I have never seen blockwork like that in the UK. Hence, my confusion.

    You won't see it much here, Nick, this house was build in the Twenties, and things have moved on, usually in a not-so-good way. How much beige vinyl siding have you got over there? It's spread around pretty thick over here.


    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    That's a new siding for me also. Weird & interesting. And, of course it's always nice to give a handshake, or at least a nod, to existing structure, lines, colors, composition, rhythms if possible.

    But, for several reasons beyond the practical, I think the equal size glazing would be best. And the door, being its own composition (color, setback, etc.) should embrace that. The multiple, evenly spaced, rails already echoes the horizontal lines of the siding. I think that's enough. Looking forward to seeing how it looks in finished form.

    There are a lot of horizontal lines , David, the blockwork, the roof line the big rectangular windows. I think the design I've got will pick up and enhance the overall feel of the wall. You can only go so far trying to pick up on details before it starts looking forced. Simple is often the best, and in this case, the easiest to build.


    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    The brickwork reminds me of a long-ago visit to Scotland, Aberdeen specifically, not sure why. I think the style of work is known as :


    Red eyes in that knocker would be sweet. Sweeter yet if they turned green when you turn your key in the lock.

    This door knocker thing is getting some legs! Thanks for putting a name to the block design. I've heard the word, but I don't know from where. Chamfers are one of my favorite details, especially for outdoor work. They create strong shadow lines for a nice bold detail

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    A form of dressing stone for high staus buildings

    Chamfering the edges of the masonry is just one style.

    That's a good example, Nick, I just knew that somebody in the UK used it long before this house was built.


    No progress on the doors today, I'm afraid. I just felt like beating my head against the wall for a bit.


    There is this, though, I found some nice hinges on Ebay. McKinney heavy duty ball bearing hinges, new old stock. This is the oiled bronze finish, but the thing is, they're bronze through and through. And heavy, they must weigh a pound apiece. There's three more coming for the other door from another seller.

  18. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    You won't see it much here, Nick, this house was build in the Twenties, and things have moved on, usually in a not-so-good way. How much beige vinyl siding have you got over there? It's spread around pretty thick over here.
    We don't do beige, we prefer white.
    It is sometimes used to replace cedar cladding or tile hung walls on dormers, but not on an entire house. A house opposite to us has it fitted. We prefer render or spar dash over block work.
    That's a good example, Nick, I just knew that somebody in the UK used it long before this house was built.
    A bit more flat surface and a lot less chamfer, though, than what was considered good taste in the '20s.

    On the subject of door knockers, we used to have a very nice dolphin. It came to the hand well and had some heft.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  19. #54
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    Both of the lower stiles were too wide to run over the jointer, so some old school flattening was in order. There's no need to have them perfectly smooth at this point, just flat. In fact it's best to stay away from the finished surface through the whole process and only sand at the end. So long as they're flat, we're good.



  20. #55
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    This is how you can check a piece for winding, or twist, same thing. Straight sticks can be used as well, and they are referred to as winding sticks, which sounds better than twist sticks. Whatever you use you place them near the ends of whatever you're checking, be it a plank, cabinet door, full size door, tabletop, whatever. You get your face down at the level of the sticks and sight across them. If the piece is flat the top edges of the sticks will appear parallel, if not, you've go some twist and the sticks indicate the high points that need to be planed to bring the piece into true.

    I know that a lot of you know this stuff, it's basic woodworking, so just humor me please because it might be of interest to some.

    Jim



  21. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    This is how you can check a piece for winding, or twist, same thing. Straight sticks can be used as well, and they are referred to as winding sticks, which sounds better than twist sticks. Whatever you use you place them near the ends of whatever you're checking, be it a plank, cabinet door, full size door, tabletop, whatever. You get your face down at the level of the sticks and sight across them. If the piece is flat the top edges of the sticks will appear parallel, if not, you've go some twist and the sticks indicate the high points that need to be planed to bring the piece into true.

    I know that a lot of you know this stuff, it's basic woodworking, so just humor me please because it might be of interest to some.

    Jim


    If you do not have the luxury of TWO framing squares, two battens or a batten and a folding rule will work as well.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  22. #57
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    09BBCDA0-795A-41BC-AB7B-1D2C5AB8FEAB.jpgThis is a pair of french doors I made this February. Khaya. I like to laminate the stiles out of 5/4 with thickened epoxy. Jambs are made from the same khaya. Interior door so no threshold. I use the Festool Domino jointer and sticking knives in lieu of proper joinery.

  23. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    If you do not have the luxury of TWO framing squares, two battens or a batten and a folding rule will work as well.

    Thanks, Nick, I should have mentioned the sticks, but the principle is the same. Now, every carpenter of a certain age that I know has at least two framing squares, his old steel one and the newer, lighter, non-corrosive aluminum one. They just seem to accumulate somehow. Don't get me started on levels, because if levels were luxury I'd be living the high life...oh, wait.
    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 04-16-2022 at 07:11 PM.

  24. #59
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    "Don't get me started on levels,"

    But I have a question ..... will you use your laser level to hang those doors when they are ready? / Jim

  25. #60
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    There is the stainless framing square two, also

  26. #61
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    Wood and brass also.
    IMG-7155.jpg
    Different trade, but hey, a square is a square if it's square.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  27. #62
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    Good grief! Flat?! Square?! I suppose you’re going to measure stuff, too? Probably twice?

    Boring! Start sawing, Bro!

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    Dr. Putt E. Painter, Esq.

  28. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Husky View Post
    This is a pair of french doors I made this February. Khaya. I like to laminate the stiles out of 5/4 with thickened epoxy. Jambs are made from the same khaya. Interior door so no threshold. I use the Festool Domino jointer and sticking knives in lieu of proper joinery.




    That's a sweet thickness sander you've got there, John. That must come in handy. I once had one and there are times I really miss having it.

    I really like those doors! Laminating the stiles is a good idea, unfortunately I only had this thick stuff, so I've gotta keep my fingers crossed they don't "cast" as they used to say.

    The Domino is a very useful machine, I've used one to make many cabinet doors, some of them quite large. It did away with dowelling completely. The good thing about it is the different size whatsits you can use and the way you can put them in in double rows.

    I'd like to ask you about your glass. I would like to put some patterned or frosted glass in mine, behind the thermopane, to increase the privacy.

    Thanks for posting this.

    Jim

  29. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "Don't get me started on levels,"

    But I have a question ..... will you use your laser level to hang those doors when they are ready? / Jim
    I've already checked the opening using the laser, Jim.

  30. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    There is the stainless framing square two, also
    Gotta get me one of those!

  31. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Wood and brass also.
    IMG-7155.jpg
    Different trade, but hey, a square is a square if it's square.
    What's that, Mike, a glaziers square? It's beautiful. Gotta get one!

  32. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Good grief! Flat?! Square?! I suppose you’re going to measure stuff, too? Probably twice?

    Boring! Start sawing, Bro!

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    Don't I know you?

  33. #68
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    Might have seen me around a few dodgy joints.

  34. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Husky View Post
    09BBCDA0-795A-41BC-AB7B-1D2C5AB8FEAB.jpgThis is a pair of french doors I made this February. Khaya. I like to laminate the stiles out of 5/4 with thickened epoxy. Jambs are made from the same khaya. Interior door so no threshold. I use the Festool Domino jointer and sticking knives in lieu of proper joinery.
    Very pretty. Nothing wrong with cope & stick backed up with loose tenons. I hope you'll share some 'done' fotos also.

    Never owned a wide-belt, though I have used them and appreciate the capability. I farm mine out now. Back when I had 6-12 employees, I had a 24" dual-grit drum sander (General). I, too, miss it. The buddy I share a shop with has a vintage wide-belt he keeps threatening to restore, but I've seen him in action. Probably not in my lifetime. <sigh>
    David G
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  35. #70
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    I really enjoy seeing custom made doors on homes. They are important ambassadors. Often overlooked for practical reasons, the front door can give the visitor an important first impression. They can be inviting, imposing, pretentious, or downright fun. Of course these are roles for architecture in general. But with so many of today's houses falling into generic patterns, the exterior door, and especially the main entry door, can stand as the sole identifier in a sea of neighborhood sameness. It's a shame that so few take advantage of the opportunity to stand out, a bit.

    Here is our front door. Not built in the craftsman style (or might I say, stile?) as Jim's and others, but 100% reflective of my wife and me. The core is two layers of 3/4" maple ply, covered inside and out with shop sawn VG douglas fir. The inlay is mild steel that has been etched with the text of a poem by Ranier Maria Rilke, that was read at our wedding by our best friend and officiate.

    Front door.jpg

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