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Thread: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    The reason I might want to keep the engine level is that I am building a small steamboat and it may make installation easier. I am planning to us a thrust bearing because the bearings in the engine are not thrust bearings.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete H View Post
    The reason I might want to keep the engine level is that I am building a small steamboat and it may make installation easier. I am planning to us a thrust bearing because the bearings in the engine are not thrust bearings.
    Fair 'nuf! I'm sure experts here can tell us about the best way to do this, but one thing I'd consider is a constant velocity joint (like one in an axle of a FWD car) instead of a U joint. They are much smoother.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Fair 'nuf! I'm sure experts here can tell us about the best way to do this, but one thing I'd consider is a constant velocity joint (like one in an axle of a FWD car) instead of a U joint. They are much smoother.
    A Constant Velocity (CV) joint-cum-thrust bearing in the same piece :

    https://www.vetus.com/en/stern-gear-...-5-flange.html

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Ian's suggestion of Dave Gerr seems a good one. He has some successful tunnel drive designs. One advantage evidently is running at speed over known bars and enjoying the surprise in the audience that you didn't rip the stern gear out.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by carioca1232001 View Post
    A Constant Velocity (CV) joint-cum-thrust bearing in the same piece :

    https://www.vetus.com/en/stern-gear-...-5-flange.html
    Perfect - though I bet it's not cheap... Nope - about $1700 US.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Vetus´ engine-to-drive-shaft couplers are renowned for their prowess in subduing noise and vibration. Not inexpensive by any means.

  7. #42
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    herez ware we r at jusnow.... fine tuning the inside


    a lil picture i made of her about 20 years ago


    At first glance, Bruce, I thought you painted a desert landscape scene on the inside of the transom. Looks like sky and mesas in the background, flat sand in the middle, and perhaps a riverbank with some greenery in the fore.

    Maybe just clear coat it?

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?



  9. #44
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post

    Broos, I can see nothing of use in this post, it seems to be a link to something in a Gmail account....
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    merci...tech foul i guess .it's just a few pics of where we are now, no biggie

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    OK, perhaps some other time.
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Sooner'n later though.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    thanks chaps....I may go back to the bigger/tighter fitting prop later then ...after a lick with a file. (this on one of my own boats)
    I would second that motion. When I was at San Juan all of their lobster yacht models had tunnels. The props were 4 bladed ZF Faster's which were progressive pitched, and they were all over square to absorb the large horsepower engines, the SJ48 wheels were 26" x 35". They also needed to be computer balanced to run right.

    They had no more than an inch clearance, which was part of the efficiency of a good tunnel design to increase thrust, at any rate all of the models reached 37 knots WOT. We also bonded noise abatement tiles on the tunnel to reduce noise. Gregory Marshall did the lines and tunnels of the first San Juan 38.

    I re-powered a Penn Yann years ago, replacing the big blocks with Yanmar 315hp diesels, and in talking with the owner who had gathered some information from Penn Yann, keeping the prop close to the tunnel walls increased their efficiency, and the 4 blades reduced the noise slap of water on the tunnel. He also said that when Penn Yann was developing the boats, they experimented with a variety of entrance shapes to the tunnels and actually used clear fiberglass sections so they could observe if they were reducing air bubbles which caused bad cavitation to the props.

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