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Thread: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
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    newburgh,NY
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    12

    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    The reason I might want to keep the engine level is that I am building a small steamboat and it may make installation easier. I am planning to us a thrust bearing because the bearings in the engine are not thrust bearings.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Hills of Vermont, USA
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    44,517

    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete H View Post
    The reason I might want to keep the engine level is that I am building a small steamboat and it may make installation easier. I am planning to us a thrust bearing because the bearings in the engine are not thrust bearings.
    Fair 'nuf! I'm sure experts here can tell us about the best way to do this, but one thing I'd consider is a constant velocity joint (like one in an axle of a FWD car) instead of a U joint. They are much smoother.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #38
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    Nov 2003
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    Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Fair 'nuf! I'm sure experts here can tell us about the best way to do this, but one thing I'd consider is a constant velocity joint (like one in an axle of a FWD car) instead of a U joint. They are much smoother.
    A Constant Velocity (CV) joint-cum-thrust bearing in the same piece :

    https://www.vetus.com/en/stern-gear-...-5-flange.html

  4. #39
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    May 2005
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    Bradford, VT
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Ian's suggestion of Dave Gerr seems a good one. He has some successful tunnel drive designs. One advantage evidently is running at speed over known bars and enjoying the surprise in the audience that you didn't rip the stern gear out.

  5. #40
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    Hills of Vermont, USA
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Quote Originally Posted by carioca1232001 View Post
    A Constant Velocity (CV) joint-cum-thrust bearing in the same piece :

    https://www.vetus.com/en/stern-gear-...-5-flange.html
    Perfect - though I bet it's not cheap... Nope - about $1700 US.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL
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    Default Re: Why are inboard engine shafts angled down ?

    Vetus´ engine-to-drive-shaft couplers are renowned for their prowess in subduing noise and vibration. Not inexpensive by any means.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
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    24,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    herez ware we r at jusnow.... fine tuning the inside


    a lil picture i made of her about 20 years ago


    At first glance, Bruce, I thought you painted a desert landscape scene on the inside of the transom. Looks like sky and mesas in the background, flat sand in the middle, and perhaps a riverbank with some greenery in the fore.

    Maybe just clear coat it?

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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