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Thread: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

  1. #1
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    Default The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  2. #2
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    I've done it, once, years ago, after reading about it here. My setup was less complicated than in the video. It's been so long ago, I can't recall even the power source I used. I used a five gallon bucket, and left it cooking for a day or so. Derusted a half dozen yardsale files and rasps. It not only cleans them up, it sharpens them, as well. It also, in my case, left them all faintly green.
    Speak softly and carry a mouthful of marbles.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    This is popular with antique engine restorers. Very effective!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mahan View Post
    I've done it, once, years ago, after reading about it here. My setup was less complicated than in the video. It's been so long ago, I can't recall even the power source I used. I used a five gallon bucket, and left it cooking for a day or so. Derusted a half dozen yardsale files and rasps. It not only cleans them up, it sharpens them, as well. It also, in my case, left them all faintly green.
    I remember an old hand telling me that dropping rusty files in acid cleaned them up and left them sharper. Similar process.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Most of my etching work is doing the opposite: My work piece is the anode and it etches. Usually with a mask of some sort over it to create a pattern. I've also done the rust removal thing as in the video. Ordinary table salt is all one needs in the water. I've never bothered with heating the water and doubt that doing so would effectively affect an overnight process.

    Jeff

  6. #6
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    The author of the video has quite a lot of interesting videos. An English rolling machine was something new to me.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  7. #7
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Thanks Gary, a good video - I’ll explore his other videos.

    A good soaking in vinegar for sharpening files - an old blacksmiths advice.
    Larks

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    I use Evapo-rust. It's amazeballs.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Thanks Gary, a good video - I’ll explore his other videos.

    A good soaking in vinegar for sharpening files - an old blacksmiths advice.

    Greg (and anybody else) this one is quite long so tune into it at 11.30. The whole thing is interesting but the old guy and his cars is great.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  10. #10
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew2 View Post
    I remember an old hand telling me that dropping rusty files in acid cleaned them up and left them sharper. Similar process.

    Vinegar does the job nicely......and with a lot less hassle than electrolysis.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Molasses has a good reputation for rust removal too.
    Steve

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mahan View Post
    I've done it, once, years ago, after reading about it here. My setup was less complicated than in the video. It's been so long ago, I can't recall even the power source I used. I used a five gallon bucket, and left it cooking for a day or so. Derusted a half dozen yardsale files and rasps. It not only cleans them up, it sharpens them, as well. It also, in my case, left them all faintly green.

    I found that Evaporust works just as good and the liquid is reusable


  13. #13
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    Molasses has a good reputation for rust removal too.
    I’ve used molasses (with water) a few times on big items (anvils, post vices, wheels). It takes a long time, is messy and smelly and attracts bugs if you don’t seal the container but it does work really well.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  14. #14
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    Default Re: The Power of Electrolysis | How To Transform Rusty Tools

    I once cleaned the inside of a motorcycle tank by electrolysis. It was difficult keeping the anode and cathode apart, but I achieved a good result.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

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