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Thread: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    I found the pictures on my other camera from the oarmaking in the basement. First one is out of sequence, the drain hole on the bottom of the mast step, carved out with a big and a small gouge.

    P1010045.jpg

    Okay, here we go on the oars. First, we octagonize the shafts which have already been tapered to the dimensions on the plans and marked with the spar gauge.

    P1010048.jpg

    Then, the octagonal part (which will become round) has to transition to the square profile on the inboard section of the looms. The plans specify 2 inches to make the transition.

    P1010050.jpg

    A spokeshave does a great job in my mind for shaping a tapered transition like this.

    P1010053.jpg

    More in the next post, but do we like shavings here?

    P1010054.jpg

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Skipping forward a couple of steps, I decided to leave the outboard part of the looms octagonal. A carpenter friend had stopped by to see what I was working on and he reminded me how nice it is to see details that emphasize that things are made by hand in these days of machined perfection. So, I planed the 8 sides smooth and then finished with a cabinet scraper.

    P1010073.jpg

    Around the blade ends, the bevels felt like they needed a bit of transition to give a better "grip" on the blade.

    P1010074.jpg

    The handles inboard of the square section got octagonized, spokeshaved round and then trimmed up with a cabinet scraper. The short transitions from square to round took a lot of work to get right. The looms are 1.5" square (since this was a two-by to begin with) and the handles are basically full diameter round. The feel wonderful in hand as I tried and scraped and tried and scraped again.

    P1010071.jpg

    One more shot of the square section of the looms, leading down into the only truly round section where it will get padded for bearing against the oarlocks.

    P1010072.jpg

    No pictures, but I worked in the garage to start trimming off the excess on the plywood bottom, the gunwales, the transom, etc. We are rapidly approaching the time to fill screw holes, sand a little bit and put on the porch paint.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Busy family weekend, but one more boat task checked off the list, blades glued into the oar shafts.

    5F3CE38C-21DC-48DC-94DA-CA8F5E0E5E3C.jpg

    It took a caul and more clamps than I expected to get all the gaps to close up, but squeeze out looked really even so I’m happy enough.

    No pictures but I also did a touch of metal work on the thole pins and got given a rusty old low-angle block plane that I’m excited to scrub up and use for some of the final trimming.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    The oars got padded using Jim Michalak’s method of “leathering” where the oar is wrapped with mason twine. I used the buried ends technique from the lazy seize. (is that really what it’s called?)

    BFA0FD91-3FC2-4D9D-A139-84F70427A736.jpg

    The bury on the starting side came out a bit cleaner than on the ending side.

    4F63DB99-222B-4034-9B75-520D30B88596.jpg

    9FDF6022-A27E-47F0-8C97-94968B89BFB2.jpg

    Michalak suggests varnishing the oars and the wraps all together, but since these oars are going to be painted (thus the yellow) I decided to put something on to hold the wraps down until they get their coat of paint. I used Ken Simpson’s waterproofing mix of 2:1 TIteBond III and water.

    E53DC2A3-74AC-4013-83B3-37A3A55376F7.jpg

    That dried very strong and smooth and hopefully will take the paint like a champ.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    After getting sanded with 60 grit, the oars are done until they get a coat of paint (which is almost ready to be bought).

    The next thing on the list is getting the hull ready for paint. The low-angle block plane works a treat for trimming plywood edges and end-grain timber. Just saw the chine log and gunwale off close and plane it all down to one flat surface (despite what the camera suggests).

    C59809FD-A3F5-4DB2-A2D4-010DA508589D.jpg

    The chines got a similar treatment all along and so did the stem. Then it was time to fill some screw holes, lots of screw holes.

    88DC9C09-377C-4AD9-8318-919D63B615EB.jpg

    2F14A9B8-F8B5-4FDD-82CE-9EB8BBBF36ED.jpg

    This is just a Famowood brand wood filler from the hardware store that I saw someone here recommended. Like all wood fillers that I’ve tried, it’s a bit of a pain to get flat down over the screw head without any “tear out”. I ended up leaving each pile a bit proud and figure on sanding it back. To fight the tendency for yacht-type finishes, Carnell the designer suggests sanding the whole boat with 60 grit and then putting on the paint. I figure that grit should make quick work of each of these dots.

    Next up is a bunch more of these holes, then sanding, waterproofing the plywood (a la Ken Simpson), one more quick sand and then porch paint.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Lots of little boat tasks, but mixed in with a busy family summer, so not many pictures. Except this morning before everyone woke up, I was working on getting ready to shape the rudder blade. The visual made me chuckle so I thought I would share it.

    962D2CA9-4E1D-47BB-BDDA-311E0E4B8263.jpg

    I made leading and trailing edge templates from the parallel-sided foil profiles from here http://www.boat-links.com/foils.html, the same ones that Michael Storer recommends on his Oz Goose plans. Then the parallel lines are the chords, perpendicular to the aft edge of the rudder, and the vertical lines are guides for locating the templates. Each template has a flat run of a couple inches, so hopefully I won’t plane away too much of my reference lines.

    Other things afoot are sanding the bottom of the hull to get ready for paint, the oars got painted, the rudder head got fabricated and the pintles attached. The tiller and tiller extension got made.

    Besides painting he hull, building the leeboard is the last big project. It can be launched as a row boat before then so I’m not sweating it, but I do keep mulling it over in my mind how I will get it done. I probably need to fix the bandsaw before I can rip up the strips for the laminations. (Now that I say that, it sounds pretty funny given how far I’ve gotten with only hand tools.)

    -Neil
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    I thought you'd be sailing for months now, but life does get in the way!

    I have two new boats in the yard that I built last winter and have yet to launch either one! Most of my free time goes to working on a fiberglass sloop, but we do get out in a canoe of an evening now and then.

    I made oars by the above method too, and I still have them! I didn't bother to leather mine because I use thole pins and pull against a rope tied around the pin, not push against the pin -

    SAM_8814s.JPG

    But I've taken to laminating oar shafts up from two sticks of wood, it warps less down the road.

    You're not gonna glass the bottom?

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Just a few in-progress pics from today.

    The rudder head is roughed in enough to mount the pintles.

    83CF788B-7420-4D40-A818-B1DCFFDE164E.jpg

    Which then let me locate the lower gudgeon and drill its mounting holes before I cover up the centerline on the transom.

    06605994-F15F-4D15-A0ED-16ED05C60A79.jpg

    I will do the other gudgeon once I flip the boat, screw this one on and set things so they rotate freely.

    And finally, it is finally time to finally put some paint on the hull. This is a thin coat of the porch paint that claims to be both a paint and a primer.

    04267E74-49E8-4364-9D37-6DE36F1A58BD.jpg

    Next I need to finish the first coat on the sides, then lightly sand it and put on a second and maybe a third coat. Then maybe we’ll go for a row on the pond after it dries for a couple weeks.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Lots of summer travel means slow boat progress. The hull did get painted on the outside before we left, my 7 year old had a blast slapping on latex porch paint while I followed him brushing out the runs.

    Some miscellaneous tasks today, I got both pintles mounted on the transom, so I could put the rudder head on he boat and figure out what I needed for placement on the tiller and drill the last hole in the rudder head. Bolger’s design has a notch on the back of the rudder head where the tiller can flip around and nest.

    03A37923-C4E5-4475-92EE-138C382F1FF2.jpg

    Here’s the furthest down position for the tiller, and a peek at the stop for the rudder which works for both the up and the down position.

    FCD83735-BB57-49F1-B8BD-9E2FCAAFAE97.jpg

    And here it is with the blade kicked up fully.

    B1DEF228-843F-45A5-9F74-BDBA1013CBBD.jpg
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    I filled screw heads on the inside of the hull, no pictures of that, and another random job to get ready for launching is making a bar with wheels for the transom so the boat can be loaded and unloaded from the car and wheeled to the water.

    The stock is an old window frame that I got off a street corner and busted up into four nice boards. The wheels came from a broken tricycle out of the junk pile. I just hack sawed the axle in two.

    682B600E-D0ED-467C-A639-5BE391902DBE.jpg

    and figured I’d drill holes in the end of the stick and just pound the axle in. But, the only bit I had that was long enough was an old square drive auger for the brace. It was surprisingly reasonable to go down 6 or 8 inches vertically through the end grain.

    B8188A43-5233-4061-A7F8-E82C11C18E64.jpg

    I’m planning to carve out a rabbet to go over the back of the transom. I haven’t figured out the right way to quickly attach it and detach it. I could put a rod up into the pintle, but the force feels like it will be trying to pry it off which doesn’t feel right. Maybe a thumbscrew and a captive nut somewhere. Do they make stainless steel T nuts?
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    93ED4AB7-F734-4415-AA70-EFCE50585515.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilMB View Post
    Do they make stainless steel T nuts?
    Most certainly, yes! We stock sizes you might find useful at Nelson’s in Viroqua. Most any hardware store stocking Hillman fasteners should have ‘em if they keep any amount of stainless (type 304) on hand. Ace in La Crosse would have ‘em too if that’s more convenient.
    Last edited by sp_clark; 08-22-2022 at 02:15 PM. Reason: Added image

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    For my first dolly I tried drilling holes in the end of a 2x4 and epoxying in axles. It lasted a season, but the 2x4 split.

    For the next version I table-sawed a groove in the bottom of a 2x4, glued the axles in with PLX3, and glued and screwed a strip of plywood over the groove. This has lasted ever since.

    To connect the 2x4 to the boat I use a single 1/4" bolt with fender washers and a wing nut. On my little skiff the hole fior the bolt is in the curved transom. The 2x4 rests on the gunwales, the transom curves above gunwale level.

    I usually just leave it in place when the boat it atop the car. It hasn't rattled loose on a 300+ mile drive, but I did stop now and then to check things out.

    101_0206.jpg

    My Featherwind used the same dolly, but it had a flat transom.

    On that boat I added a narrow "deck" across the stern. The dolly 2x4 rested flat on top of that. A hole in the middle of the "deck" took the bolt and two blocks in the corners of the little "deck" held the 2x4 in place. If you look closely at the stern you can see this setup -

    SAM_6502.jpg

    I really like your rudder! But, David Beedes design of the rudder on the Summer breeze (my little skiff) has totally spoiled me and I used it on my Featherwind and every other small boat since. The front of the rudder has a notch just above transom height. The sheet runs through the back of the notch in the tiller and over the rudder. Thus, the sheet is clamped between rudder and tiller. Just lift the tiller a tiny bit and the sheet flies free. The weight of your arm is enough to clamp the sheet in place, in most winds anyway.


    sailing 067.jpg

    I find this works amazingly well! I've added a cleat to the top of the tiller and ran a bungee from one side of the stern, over the tiller in front of the cleat, and to the other side of the stern. This bungee holds both the tiller and the sheet for me! Any gust of wind pulls the sheet from under the tiller, the bungee isn't that strong.

    That's the "autopilot" system I came up with for the first Salish 100 cruise, and it worked very well indeed. Here you can see it in action as I "motorsail" along.

    48246250821_b952ac6152_o.jpg

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Thanks everyone. I did find the stainless T-nuts in my local Ace hardware. I used two for attaching the wheels rather than one, somehow couldn’t get my mind around the single point thing. I did choose bolts that were too short, so I’ll need to exchange them for something a bit longer.

    I was stressing about being able to attach it when the boat was on the car, but leaving it in place is the perfect answer!

    The last big fabrication task is the Lee board. I didn’t buy the extra half-sheet of 1/2” plywood that the plans use for the leeboard, so mine is going to be made from laminated solid wood, about 1/2” thick. Step one was to rip the individual staves from my last Douglas fir boards. Here’s the 8 strips that hopefully will finish out to 1.5” wide when I plane them smooth.

    94B8A403-CDAC-4C0B-99A0-E58AEE44853F.jpg

    I have a lot to learn about jointing them with a hand plane and gluing them up, but I’m looking forward to it. Then it gets shaped to profile and painted.

    Theres also plenty of sanding left to do getting the inside of the hull ready for paint.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Also painting the rudder head and the rudder blade today. They’ve been sealed and lightly sanded with 60 grit.

    F2DDF1E8-3238-4514-BB2A-FBC1A1CD4C3C.jpg

    First thin coat of porch paint. The paint manufacturer suggests using the same paint as the primer and the top coat.

    69A5C283-CCF9-480C-8B7A-5DDB45DE543D.jpg

    The off-white “sand” color seems lighter than I might have imagined it from the paint sample, but, live and learn. It’s the same shade that will go on the inside of the boat.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    One small step each day. It was a busy Saturday for the family, but this evening after the kids went to bed I got to glue up my first pair of staves for the leeboard.

    D6AB821E-F3E7-4BAC-9126-9C1DC7E43787.jpg

    The joint closed up fine, even though it was a bit “sprung” along the length in some places. I am straight up embarrassed in this crowd that this is almost all of the bar clamps I own, but it’ll get done eventually. I might even get brave enough to joint and glue up more then two of them at a time. But maybe not.

    I would have done some painting, but I left my paint can where I can’t get it tonight, so early to bed and dream with the atlas a little. (Lake Champlain to the Champlain canal to the Hudson, maybe? Sandusky Bay? Green Bay? Estonia? The possibilities are delightfully endless.)
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Lots of boat work this Sunday, not too much to show for it in pictures though.

    The final leeboard lamination is clamped up now. I did end up doing all of the joints pairwise, but they were fine coming out of the clamps after a couple of hours, so I got through all the stages in a day or so. 8 strips aiming for 1.5” wide finished and the whole thing came out around 12.25” inches overall. 54” long is close enough for me to the 55” specified on the plans.

    A6D906D0-6DB9-4CED-97B9-7BA0E79A0716.jpg

    The biggest project was sanding the inside of the hull, sealing it, and then lightly scuff sanding the raised grain. With the humidity recently, it needs a bit longer to cure before paint, but it’s ready for its two or three coats of porch paint.

    02CA1CC4-9051-4A4D-88F8-15091293DA57.jpg

    82C70611-E9FD-40E1-B027-9EE8E7AC50F8.jpg

    A friend asked me if I’d be ready to sail by Labor Day and I downplayed the possibility, but now I’m not so sure. Inside paint and mount the oarlocks and hardware on the transom, then it’ll be ready to row. The leeboard needs shaping, finishing, and mounting before we can sail though.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    It was shades of Huck Finn in here today, I had three helpers from age 7 to 11 putting on the first coat of the inside paint. I snuck out after their bed time and put the second coat on.

    8C98297F-FBE3-44B0-ABED-04246D527018.jpg

    For once, the masking tape gave me a nice smooth line. I liked this shot of the top of the frame, the as-yet-unpainted gunwale and the contrasting hull color. (Guess what wild color my daughter might pick for the gunwale?)

    69C41536-9BB4-4284-BA12-534287A32883.jpg

    I think I’m going to put it in the water without painting the gunwale, just mount the oarlock sockets back here on their pads and go for a family splash around on the upcoming holiday.

    C34D405B-2969-4B71-8FB5-571F1DF75317.jpg

    To be able to sail by then, I need to flatten the glued-up Lee board, shape the profile and put a big hole in it to hang it on the side of the boat. Then there’s a tiny bit of rigging for the Sunfish rig, I think just a cleat for the halyard and a traveler for the main sheet.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Hung the rudder hardware back on with caulk to plug up the remaining holes in the transom and finished putting the oars and their “locks” on.

    3257A9F9-9261-40E5-B413-DACA50ECA5C7.jpg

    93C0B87B-5600-4F22-AE24-F9BBC7867261.jpeg

    Launch date is set for Labor Day at our local county park’s 38 acre lake. Not an impressive body of water by forum standards, but any port (puddle?) in a storm.

    I’m still hoping that we will be able to sail along with rowing, but I’ve got to finish up with this big hunk of wood:

    A913F9CD-A733-44C0-8FCD-55A53AD4AF48.jpg

    I traversed it at 45 degrees both ways with a scrub plane and finished with the No. 4 smoother. Came out to 5/8” thick which is thicker than the 1/2” plywood specified in the plans and all the grain runs the right way in this, unlike in a sheet of plywood used for a leeboard. I still love just looking at the grain structure on this really old salvaged fir.

    5D633FD2-B89D-4CBD-950E-B1CB4D032DA6.jpg

    Last steps are to round the leading edge and taper the trailing edge, then drill a mounting hole in it and a coat or two of paint. And then … woo hooo … hopefully.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Leeboard looks great - definitely an upgrade to the plywood version.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Launch day today. I've got a backlog of pictures from the last few projects to get ready, but here's what really matters.

    5163969939754729415.jpg

    Sailing 4-up plus a dog in a home-built boat with a Sunfish sail. What a feeling of success. This is what I was hoping for when I first went looking for boat designs.

    Cartoppable? Check.

    5865438930470247164.jpg

    P1010337.jpg

    I put it up and down all by myself many, many times yesterday and today, following the method from Dave Carnell's plans. Bow up on the rear rack, transom wheels on the ground, then push forward as the wheels roll in and the bow goes up in the air, then the balance point gets near and it gets really easy to push the stern up into the air and slide it all the rest of the way forward. I ended up building some wooden slats to go over the roof rack bars for a few more inches of width, plus about a foot of width on the right side to tie on the spars and sail together. Oars, leeboard, and rudder go inside. The wooden bunks need carpet covering still, but not too much paint was lost off the upper edge of the hull (the gunwales don't have their coat of paint yet).

    4432922296647436429.jpg

    Wind was off the dock when there was any wind so this was the easy part.

    -7906116286816943039.jpg

    Running on the starboard tack, probably lecturing my family about terminology. Trim was okay, but maybe a bit tail heavy.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Not too many good pictures from today, but here's Clementine enjoying her time on the water very much.

    P1010375.jpg

    She's part poodle, so maybe it's in her bloodline.


    P1010380.jpg

    A great day was had by all, lots was learned, many additional tasks put on the list based on today's experience. DIY oarlocks were not a massive first-time success, going to buy some to get safely on the water until I'm ready to go back to tinkering. Need to get it registered, put name and numbers on, etc., etc.

    Thanks to everyone here for the good advice, moral support, and encouragement to go ahead with it. I owe most of today's success to the good will shown here at this forum, not least for showing that it is indeed possibly to build and sail your own boat. Folks at the boat ramp were pretty amazed to hear it. Seems like they may never have seen any boat like it before and they were mighty impressed that it was just 1/4" A/C plywood and some porch paint (and a whole lot of know-how, that's where you all came in).

    There's more to come on this thread as things get tuned up and more adventures happen, but for tonight, it's all gratitude.

    -Neil
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

  22. #92
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    central cal
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    The phrase that comes to mind is, “frikkin dope, Yo!” I hope you have a great time for a long time. You should be very proud.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Great. Glad to see it all went so well.
    -Dave

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Congrats!
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  25. #95
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    UK
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Looks great fun, well done!

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Outstanding!

    It's great to see it on the water and I'm please it does everything you wanted it to!

    Happy sailing!

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    You should send Thomas Vetromile a copy of this photo!


  28. #98
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    Good job of it! Looks right fun!

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Carnell Nutmeg: an MVB, a “minimum viable boat”

    One of the post-launch tweaks still left is to paint the gunwales their accent color. My daughter the 6th grade artist picked the color scheme and it sure looks dramatic. Nobody Is going to mistake me for an old fuddy-duddy, that’s for sure.

    30EB4FF6-6A88-441D-BB80-4032A10A59D2.jpg

    It needs the second coat and then a few more things can move along like the new oarlocks.
    Dreaming of sailing in Iowa, building a Carnell Nutmeg.

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