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Thread: Shooting clay

  1. #1
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    Default Shooting clay

    Thinking about guns this morning, I remembered being attracted to them when I was a kid. At fourteen, I begged my folks, and finally wore them down, and with their permission and supervision, I bought a single shot twelve gauge shotgun, with forty bucks of birthday money, and learned about shooting clays. My dad took me to a range and we lined up when it was our turn and shot trap. I blew away the first three clays I shot at. The old-timers there, with the patches on their shooting vests denoting membership in the fifty or hundred in a row club, were impressed. Then I was skunked the rest of the day, beginners luck.

    When I was stationed at Osan AB, in Korea, in the seventies, I heard that under Korean law, private citizens weren't allowed to own firearms, with the exception that rice farmers were allowed to own and use shotguns to keep rice-eating birds from their crops. AND, that under the US status of forces agreement, the local US commander in Korea was allowed a license, which by agreement was extended to GIs on base who applied for a permit, for use on base, and that there was an honest-to-goodness rod-and-gun club on base, situated at the end of the flight line, out overlooking the wetland on the coast of the Yellow Sea, to the west of the Korean penninsula.

    So me and a couple of friends went and found out that you could, for five bucks, buy a box of shells, and sign up to use a rental twelve-gauge auto shotgun to shoot clays at the range there.

    A pleasant way to break up the monotony of shift work alternating with drunk softball or going into the 'ville' for drinks and getting laid. (Which I never did, because I was married. Of the married guys I knew, I was the only one to keep my vow.)

    Everything was straight forward and reasonable—step up, load a round, yell 'pull' and then take a shot at the flung clay pigeon, step back, taking turns, one after another, twenty-five shots.

    One afternoon as we were standing on station waiting for the short house to set up more clays, a pheasant got up, about twenty yards out, and fluttered away over the thules, and like we were on auto-pilot three or four of the guys started blazing away at it, even though it was quickly way out of range of our shotguns. Then, "Look, a goose!" At altitude blam, blam, blam.

    Cordite is good to mask the all-pervasive scent of kimchi.


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    My uncle and I gave my daughter a birthday present at a clay shooting club in her mid teens.

    She was quite good.

    I tried a couple and was OK.

    The instructor who was also a 'clay shooting' competitor let me try two rounds of competition size shells.

    There was a tremendous difference, in kick, in comparison to the shells they supplied to walk-in shooters like us.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNuVhGvOwtI

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    Too hard to cook. I suppose if one used enough butter...

  4. #4
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    Default

    Good story.

    I've only ever shot trap twice. First time out, I used a friend's 12-gauge pump (Remington? Mossberg?) I think I got 3 or 4 out of the 25.

    Next time, somebody let shoot with his custom, bespoke trap gun. Must have cost multiple thousands of dollars.

    More like 24 out of 25.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    Are there machines like what they have at golf driving ranges that go out and clean up the ground of all that broken clay?
    "Where you live in the world should not determine whether you live in the world." - Bono

    "Live in such a way that you would not be ashamed to sell your parrot to the town gossip." - Will Rogers

    "Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." - Groucho Marx

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    back when my family ran hundreds of rounds a week at the range we raked up the wads in front of the stands, but that was it
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    My nephew has a setup on his grounds where he is shooting out over an uninhabited valley. I assume the clay is biodegradable, not sure what happens to the shot. I know it is not lead anymore, but is there such a thing as shot that dissolves?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    sporting clays sportsmen still shoot Pb
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    I assume the clay is biodegradable,
    It may be, but walking the mesas around Los Alamos and seeing the clay shards lying on the ground from hundreds of years ago make me question that assumption.
    "Where you live in the world should not determine whether you live in the world." - Bono

    "Live in such a way that you would not be ashamed to sell your parrot to the town gossip." - Will Rogers

    "Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." - Groucho Marx

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    Depends on the supplier. They're pretty much all calcium carbonate, but the binder can be non-biodegradable and/or toxic. Same with the paint.

  11. #11
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    Default Shooting clay

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    sporting clays sportsmen still shoot Pb


    At the risk of being a pedant.
    We often shoot steel at clays because we often shoot clays off a boat, or from shore and out over the bay. But at a range or gun club, yeah, lead.

    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  12. #12
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    Default Shooting clay

    To Jims point, I remember sitting in a hide in the woods during crow season. I shot and missed a bird, hitting a sapling instead. ( standing deadwood, actually)Took a chip out of the trunk.

    Next thing, my buddy rises up and shoots the tree.

    Then me.

    Then him.

    Then me.

    Then him.

    And the tree fell.

    Dumbass kids. Or, maybe it WAS the cordite?
    Kevin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    Are there machines like what they have at golf driving ranges that go out and clean up the ground of all that broken clay?
    The club we used to shoot at had a machine that scraped up the clay, then sifted the shot out of it, re-bagged it and sold it back to the shooters (cheap). We loaded our own, but all I ever used the reclaimed shot for was benchrest bags. The clay was ground up and some used for fill (the club was in an old rock quarry) and for pathways.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Shooting clay

    The boxes of clay targets we always bought had a warning;. "Do not use in areas where hogs feed."
    What's that about? Is that warning still seen on the boxes today?

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