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Thread: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

  1. #141
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Bruce,
    have you considered an inflatable 2-person pack raft or kayak?

    For Camas Moon, I opted for a 1-person packraft as I wasn't willing to tow anything. It weighs only about 5-6 pounds. When deflated it takes very little space and can be stowed almost anywhere. I think the 2-person versions are about double that weight, but that is still very light compared to any hard boats. It takes about 10 minutes to inflate it and get it ready.

    CLC's observation about low-inertia boats is spot-on for a packraft, with the additional downside of them having the directional stability of a beach ball. However, as I primarily use to get from the boat to shore in calm-ish conditions, I don't see it as much of a drawback.
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  2. #142
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post

    I don't remember whether or not I've posted this before, but I made up one of these "chairs" for Marianita last spring and have found it to be quite comfortable:

    It hangs from one of several "eyenuts" I installed to bolt the handrails to the roof, when not needed it unclips, rolls up and stores away in a very small bundle. Borrowed from something I saw Harry Bryan do in one of his Off Center Harbor videos. Quite comfortable and you don't have to pile a bunch of duffle to get your head up.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
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  3. #143
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Bruce, I have been using a small inflatable pack raft:
    B8B935D9-3275-450F-820D-B1ACCBF0AA00.jpg
    the trade off is exactly what you’ve encountered with your wee sit on top. The benefit for me is that it deflates and rolls up to stow aboard in a trice, nothing to tow and no leeway inducing drag for a small boat. For me, that is worth it, and my first mate doesn’t mind being dropped at dock or beach while I faff around with the teeny kayak. Several seasons back, I sailed in company that included three boats about Luna and Umami’s size (I was still in Waxwing as my cruising boat then), and the leeway from towing dinghies was impressive, and not in a good way. Maybe folks with lots of experience towing various dinghies behind not so big boats can speak to how well various designs tow.

  4. #144
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Unfortunately, Feathercraft closed its doors and no longer makes the very high-quality, light weight Baylee series inflatable raft. Or for that matter, their inflatable kayaks.
    I have a Baylee 3 HD and am impressed with it every time I use it. If you see one used take a look, they even came with composite Werner Skagit oars. Be prepared to be shocked by the price till you can appreciate their quality.
    Last edited by Autonomous; 10-23-2022 at 12:23 PM.
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
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  5. #145
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    I don't remember whether or not I've posted this before, but I made up one of these "chairs" for Marianita last spring and have found it to be quite comfortable:

    It hangs from one of several "eyenuts" I installed to bolt the handrails to the roof, when not needed it unclips, rolls up and stores away in a very small bundle. Borrowed from something I saw Harry Bryan do in one of his Off Center Harbor videos. Quite comfortable and you don't have to pile a bunch of duffle to get your head up.
    Steve that is great. I'll make one and surprise FM!

    And anything Harry Bryan does is pretty good with me. He tows a dinghy.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  6. #146
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Thanks for the tips on the inflatables. FM is unmoved. Comically so. I'll definitely give her another chance to see the light before I huff epoxy fumes.

    One thing she really, really liked on the boat was the cockpit tent.



    I foolishly designed it without thinking of all the rigging that might be in the way, so I had to string it beneath the boom instead of over it. I think next year, I'll just untie the lazy jacks when we're using the tent, so it can be lifted a bit further overhead.


    I used Odyssey III (who knows what happened to versions I & II? ) which is lighter and totally water resistant. It is also much lighter than Sunbrella. The tent has three sets of batten pockets. Aluminum tent poles scavenged from an old tent serve as battens. They work fine, but would be better if they were a bit rigid. The whole thing folds up into a small bundle when underway.

    The system works perfectly as designed and keeps FM's cushions really dry. The one night we didn't put out the tent, she was surprised at the effects. I wasn't!
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  7. #147
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    I have a tent for the Romilly. The Brits mounted some oarlock sockets outboard on the coaming and put up some 1/2" fiberglass rods to span them. Simple and keeps you from having to stick battens in pockets. For a row sail boat, oarlock sockets can be used the same way. Gives you a nice hoop tent.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
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  8. #148
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    I have a tent for the Romilly. The Brits mounted some oarlock sockets outboard on the coaming and put up some 1/2" fiberglass rods to span them. Simple and keeps you from having to stick battens in pockets. For a row sail boat, oarlock sockets can be used the same way. Gives you a nice hoop tent.
    Ben, you are so right. Sockets would make for a more stable set up. I'll work on that for next season.



    I would like to pause here to apologize to First Mate. I was wrong about the cushions.

    I've always sailed boats that are minimalist in nature. A canoe, a rowing boat, a fiberglass dinghy. There has been caning or webbing to sit on, but that has only a little give. I've occasionally had one of those life-saving throw cushions to keep my bottom off a wooden thwart, but it would just be a 2x2' square. And that was only if it was handy. Otherwise the sole padding to be found on my ships was a little fat and muscle.

    Having two-inch cushions, covered in Sunbrella, turned a small boat trip into sort of a luxury cruise for us. It was glorious.

    I may have said this above, but I'll say it again. I'm a lazy sewer. I like to make things, but often if the object is close enough to achieve the design objective, it is good enough to me. I especially like sewing because you can put a tuck or dart into something a little too big. You can add a panel onto something too small. But with these cushions, FM was so excited, so demanding that we have them, that I wanted them to actually be nice. To be precise. I suddenly wanted other people to think my cushions were nice.

    The fabric was costly. The marine-grade foam was notably expensive.

    I measured twice, I cut once, I stapled fabric and sewed in a straight line. And when the cushions were done, they actually were nice. Even I was impressed. This (admittedly fuzzy) picture shows how much wonderful lazy nothingness can be accomplished on a cruise.


    Yes people, I am a convert. BRING ON THE CUSHIONS!

    -Bruce
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  9. #149
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    RE: Cushions.

    Now you've gone and increased my list of projects for Camas Moon, just when I was beginning to make progress on making the list smaller
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  10. #150
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    RE: Cushions.

    Now you've gone and increased my list of projects for Camas Moon, just when I was beginning to make progress on making the list smaller
    I'll bring my 1978 Viking Husqvarna up to your place! But seriously, I think we're equal- you've got a formal seat!



    That's pretty nice too.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  11. #151
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising


    Let's move on to less comfortable items... like watching your boat be hoisted in mid-air! Actually, it was fun to see the hull shape way up in the air! And glad that a couple of advanced teenagers can operate a travel lift. There are two of these in Anacortes. I like the one at Cap Sante Marina. There's one on the west side of Fidalgo Island, but it is a bit more exposed over there...

    Anyhow, let's focus on the motor on the aft end. This was my first long voyage where I relied on the motor.

    We have a Tohatsu 4-stroke, 5-horse engine on there. Used about 2.5 gallons over our two weeks out there. I learned a lot about the motor including:
    1. I am no good at maneuvering in tight spaces, like finger docks.
    2. Using the motor's tiller helps to make tighter turns.
    3. Sometimes starting the engine in a faster speed setting is more helpful than at idle.
    4. Always, always remember to open the breather valve in the gas tank.
    5. Be firm and consistent with the pull cord. Half-way strokes just make a mess of things.
    6. Motors still scare me a bit, especially around gazillion dollar yachts that pack the marinas.
    7. This engine seemed adequate for our needs to zoom away from ferries, power through a few currents, and move places on no-wind days.

    A sculling oar is still in our future.

    -Bruce
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  12. #152
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    I should have mentioned that I would value any other motor tips from those so inclined to discuss.

    Speaking of ferries and navigation...



    There were lots of them. They were mostly easy to avoid using a combination of binoculars, staying to the shallow side of the known routes, and scootching away with the motor when uncertainty reigned.

    No electronics were used in the production of this cruise! Though there's of course an ap for that.

    We did carry a radar reflector on a nice dowel which could be raised on the flag halyard should the need arise...



    Fortunately, the only safety need it played was to raise a lantern for an anchor light...
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  13. #153
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    I'm enjoying reading about your lessons learned with a bigger boat.

    4. Always, always remember to open the breather valve in the gas tank.

    One of the few times I've ran my outboard I wondered why it kept sputtering and dying after a little over a minute of running fine. I think it took me 5 or 6 attempts before I remembered the vent.

  14. #154
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I should have mentioned that I would value any other motor tips from those so inclined to discuss.
    Old gasoline sitting in the carburetor gums up the passages and jets, even worse it can cause corrosion.
    Use fuel stabilizer. Techron is brilliant at dissolving gum, way better than old school Sea Foam, etc. Learn how to drain the carb before storage.
    Spray the powerhead with silicon spray or similar. Don't neglect the water pump impeller. Fresh water rinse after running in salt including the cooling system.
    Carry a spare spark plug even with a four stroke.
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
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  15. #155
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I should have mentioned that I would value any other motor tips from those so inclined to discuss.
    Ok, here goes:

    Give that thing the deep six, Bruce!

    (I'm too lazy to deal with the extra conveniences motors impose)

    Tom
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  16. #156
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    I'm with Tom regarding the motor. That said, when rowing my chebacco (using 2 oars), it takes me a LONG time to get there, so I have to plan for that.

    Bruce, here's a question on another topic, I wonder about the warm clothing you guys are wearing. I just googled the Anacortes water temperature and it said 49 degrees today, brrrrr!!! On a dingy, they say you should "dress for immersion" and I see some guys bring dry suits when the water is cold. On a ballasted keelboat, they don't seem to worry about such things. However, I mean, a chebacco is basically a large dingy, right? I haven't yet heard of a chebacco capsizing by accident, but the thought of it still haunts me. Roger Barnes seems to get by with lots of wool, so I realize there are several schools of thought out there, I just wondered about your approach for the chebacco. Do you have any experience/thoughts about fitting out your clothing during cruises in your cold-water playgrounds?

    Chris in Virginia Beach (water temp 63 degrees and falling...)

  17. #157
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    My Jewell is a boat of very similar scale as the Chebacco, and about as new to me as Bruce’s boat is to him. I have been experimenting with oars as well as a yuloh for the past two seasons; I am not remotely convinced it will be practical to go completely motorless for cruising where any kind of distances or serious currents are a factor until my yuloh technique is much improved (if ever). I have never gotten along especially well with internal combustion engines, so I appreciate the desire to get away from them whenever it is reasonable. Thinking about the early days of recreational cruising, when engines were scarce, or scarcely functional, our cruising progenitors just dropped anchor to wait out a foul tide, choosing to take the dinghy out into the harbor to render some drawings, or pass the time in some other pleasantry. I think I need to start channelling my inner George Holmes more.

  18. #158
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by John hartmann View Post
    My Jewell is a boat of very similar scale as the Chebacco, and about as new to me as Bruce’s boat is to him. I have been experimenting with oars as well as a yuloh for the past two seasons; I am not remotely convinced it will be practical to go completely motorless for cruising where any kind of distances or serious currents are a factor until my yuloh technique is much improved (if ever). I have never gotten along especially well with internal combustion engines, so I appreciate the desire to get away from them whenever it is reasonable. Thinking about the early days of recreational cruising, when engines were scarce, or scarcely functional, our cruising progenitors just dropped anchor to wait out a foul tide, choosing to take the dinghy out into the harbor to render some drawings, or pass the time in some other pleasantry. I think I need to start channelling my inner George Holmes more.
    My boat is in this range, too. 18'6", 5 foot beam and about a ton displacement. I've found that sail and oars and patience work fine 98 percent of the time. That other 2 percent is when it's too windy to row and I need to squeeze into small spaces -- typically getting back to the dock or into a marina. For those times, I have an electric trolling motor. I've yet to knock the battery pack below 50% charge over several days cruising.
    -Dave

  19. #159
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by csmead View Post
    I wonder about the warm clothing you guys are wearing. I just googled the Anacortes water temperature and it said 49 degrees today, brrrrr!!! On a dingy, they say you should "dress for immersion" and I see some guys bring dry suits when the water is cold. On a ballasted keelboat, they don't seem to worry about such things. However, I mean, a chebacco is basically a large dingy, right? I haven't yet heard of a chebacco capsizing by accident, but the thought of it still haunts me. Roger Barnes seems to get by with lots of wool, so I realize there are several schools of thought out there, I just wondered about your approach for the chebacco. Do you have any experience/thoughts about fitting out your clothing during cruises in your cold-water playgrounds?

    Chris in Virginia Beach (water temp 63 degrees and falling...)
    Immersion is a really interesting and important question for us northerly sailors. One some of us choose to ignore entirely. When I first started going on extended trips in row boats, and sail & oar boats, I checked with a lot of people about what they wear and how they prepare for the worst.

    I eventually settled on wearing all wool and polly clothes when underway, but always carry a drysuit (here's an essay about that) for when the going gets tough. I don't wear the drysuit, except when things are likely to get bad, like when I start putting in the second reef.

    Here's the famous (and jumpy) video of Jamie's boat being intentionally capsized:


    It does take some work, but it can be done. My experience so far is that you have to make a number of bad decisions to make a chebacco capsize... still it is wise to exercise caution. I don't think self-righting a chebacco is a likely outcome. I'll assume, we're going to pile into the dinghy or sit on the hull and call for help. For us, we don't make many big passages- this is a sheltered water boat, not an ocean cruiser. Jamie has done more than any of us, it would be nice to hear his thoughts.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  20. #160
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Yes, wool/poly clothing, and I keep a drytop and wetsuit shorty stored with foulies. I also keep a “ditch bag” aboard, a small drybag with a change of warm dry clothing. I can easily reboard Waxwing without any assistance, but Umami has enough freeboard that I have rigged a step which is easily accessible from outside the boat from the water, making solo reentry easier. I also have a rigid folding step, which is not yet mounted on the transom (a project for before the start of next season).

  21. #161
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    I used to put on my drysuit whenever I reefed. I have gotten more complacent about that as I've learned that dipping the lee rail does not invariably lead to capsizing, and that my boat has a lot more reserve stability than it felt like during the first year or two of sailing it.

    My usual waters--Georgian Bay in mid-summer--are warm enough that a swim of an hour or two is pleasant. I'd be less complacent on Lake Superior, for sure.

    Tom
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  22. #162
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Cruising in coastal Maine, I have settled with the combination towing a CLC ultralight and using a Torqeedo for backup propulsion. My Vivier/Chase Jewell is too big for me to row. I really don't notice any effect of towing this small dinghy. It's not easy to test this is a quantitative way. I suspect any effect is small. It allows me to anchor or pick up a mooring, yet get to shore. As previously noted, you have to step into the bottom of the dinghy like you were canoe, etc. It carries two adults and a bit of gear or supplies easily. On sunny days, it holds my solar panel to help keep the Torqeedo batteries topped up. It just fits into the bed of my Tacoma which I use to tow the Jewell. Six ft. oars stow in the dinghy.

    As to the issue of an outboard, I think it is a worthwhile backup. If the wind dies, I can make slow progress. I just about break even charging one battery while I run on the other. If the breeze fills in, I sail but can still charge. Once, running from a summer thunderstorm, it helped get me up a narrow channel and into a harbor against a bit of tide. I feel just a bit safer cruising with the motor.

    As to dry suits: how do others deal with donning these? I'm so slow in putting mine on that I would be hesitant to put it on in a big wind. I would have had to anticipated the breeze before I set out.

    Frank K

  23. #163
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I used to put on my drysuit whenever I reefed. I have gotten more complacent about that as I've learned that dipping the lee rail does not invariably lead to capsizing, and that my boat has a lot more reserve stability than it felt like during the first year or two of sailing it.

    My usual waters--Georgian Bay in mid-summer--are warm enough that a swim of an hour or two is pleasant. I'd be less complacent on Lake Superior, for sure.

    Tom
    An advantage to row cruising over sailing - hard to capsize a rowboat. I was able to swamp and sink one in SF Bay in November, water around 55, and was happy to be rescued without having to swim around a mile to shore (with strong current).

    Motors, BTW, should only be electric....

  24. #164
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    Immersion is a really interesting and important question for us northerly sailors. One some of us choose to ignore entirely. When I first started going on extended trips in row boats, and sail & oar boats, I checked with a lot of people about what they wear and how they prepare for the worst.

    I eventually settled on wearing all wool and polly clothes when underway, but always carry a drysuit (here's an essay about that) for when the going gets tough. I don't wear the drysuit, except when things are likely to get bad, like when I start putting in the second reef.

    Here's the famous (and jumpy) video of Jamie's boat being intentionally capsized:


    It does take some work, but it can be done. My experience so far is that you have to make a number of bad decisions to make a chebacco capsize... still it is wise to exercise caution. I don't think self-righting a chebacco is a likely outcome. I'll assume, we're going to pile into the dinghy or sit on the hull and call for help. For us, we don't make many big passages- this is a sheltered water boat, not an ocean cruiser. Jamie has done more than any of us, it would be nice to hear his thoughts.
    Did someone say Chebacco?

    That was a memorable day. As Bruce noted, it's not easy to capsize a Chebacco - we had to trip her up by running a line from the dock under the hull to cleat on side away from the dock. Then the rescue boat in attendance took a line from our masthead and pulled us over. The boat was pretty well stripped out, we had the sails up, but no engine or equipment was on board. I'd also taken out the floorboards to avoid having to chase them down after they floated away.

    On the first capsize, our intention was to go to 90 degrees and recover from there. Thanks to Elijah, who was very quick to get over the side and onto the centreboard, that went well, but see my conclusions further on.

    The second time, we wanted to go 180 degrees and try to recover from that. Once pulled over, there was no problem going to 180. Upside down she was stable, and the bottom was about 18 inches above the water. The centreboard fell back into the slot - wouldn't want to have a hand in there at the time, could have lost some fingers. However, by getting our toes on the rubrail and gripping the centreboard slot, we were able to right her fairly easily - I think one man could do it but might need a line from the opposite side to get more leverage. The bad new was that as she rolled upright, we could hear water pouring over the other side, and by the time she was upright, both the cabin and cockpit were flooded. She was floating pretty well level, except that the stern was a few inches above the water - there are two hatches on the afterdeck, with weatherstripping seals and that kept the stern from completely flooding, at least for the time we were in the water. At this point she was afloat, but only just, and couldn't support anyone standing in the cockpit. The centreboard opening was below the water, and although this is small and easily plugged in Wayward Lass, the water was also above the coaming where it joins the cabin so bailing wasn't going to work.

    The rescue boat had a pretty skookum pump though, and cleared the water out quickly.

    My conclusions:

    I believe that on the first capsize we only avoided going completely upside down due to Elijah's quick reactions. A Chebacco on its side floats quite high, leaving the horizontal masts well above the water. Their weight pulls the boat over further, but the masts don't provide any significant flotation at first as only the top touches the water. As the boat keeps rolling over, the masts provide more flotation but by then the hull is past the point of no return and is headed to 180 degrees. I don't think anyone can count on being able to stop the capsize at 90 degrees because they will still be occupied trying to prevent it and will be too late to get on the centreboard. Also many of us are just not fit enough to get there in time - at the time of our capsizes I had sciatica, and couldn't move easily. On the other hand, Elijah was young and fit and poised to act.

    Once we were upside down, self recovery was not a realistic option. If I were capsized by myself in real life, I wouldn't try to right the boat. I'd climb on top where I was out of the water, get a mayday out on the VHF and get my flares ready - assuming I could reach both VHF and flares.

    Perhaps with the drop boards in place and the hatch pulled shut we could have righted ourselves before the cabin filled, at least we would have had a real chance (I think.) If there are some volunteers out there, maybe we can experiment some more?

    Adding flotation would be the best solution if you feel capsizing is a real risk, I haven't done that but might consider it if I was building today. I do prepare carefully before going out, and I pick my weather windows to avoid getting into trouble - I also have a lot of faith in the boat, but that's just me - YEMD.

    Jamie

  25. #165
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    As i recall when I was trying to clear the cabin with a bucket I was thinking about things that could get sealed up. Compartment in the stem maybe, and someway to keep water from flowing back under the seats. Would be easy to do in the build. Hard to retrofit. I was toasty in my old friend my dry suit.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  26. #166
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    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank K. View Post
    As to dry suits: how do others deal with donning these? I'm so slow in putting mine on that I would be hesitant to put it on in a big wind. I would have had to anticipated the breeze before I set out.
    When I was using mine more, I typically wore the pants and left the top tied around my waist (one-piece suit, but it worked pretty well that way). From there I got pretty quick at pulling the top on and zipping it. My suit uses a neoprene neck seal which is far easier and more comfortable to put on. Having used it, I'd never want a rubber neck gasket again.

    That said, putting it on IN the boat while sailing, especially in windy/wavy/choppy conditions, was much harder. Better to anticipate, or to land for a moment if possible to put the suit on before launching again.

    Tom
    Ponoszenie konsekwencji!

    www.tompamperin.com

  27. #167
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    4,347

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    The neoprene neck seal dry suit is much more comfortable than the rubber seal but isn't completely watertight. Not so good for people who routinely immerse themselves completely like paddlers, but a decent choice for sailboaters as long as they recognize that there will be leakage if the suit is put to serious use.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  28. #168
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,714

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    My “dry top” is not a true dry suit, rather a hybrid material that is a medium to heavy weight fleece type material with a thin rubber skin—NRS sells it as “hydroskin”. Not as good protection as a classic wetsuit or dry suit over fleece, but easier on/off and very comfortable when weather is getting marginal, and possible to layer.
    Last edited by John hartmann; 11-09-2022 at 07:03 AM. Reason: Clarity

  29. #169
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,909

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    I carry both a drysuit with a rubber neck seal and a Mustang UVic Floater Coat (which I’ve had for decades).

    The drysuit is a fairly recent acquisition, bought the winter after an unintentional dunking during a knockdown on the first leg of my Inside Passage trip. I describe the circumstances in my book, but suffice it to say that I had put on my Floater Coat before the knockdown happened. I had put on the Floater Coat for warmth in the cold breeze, not because I thought the conditions were too gnarly – they weren’t – it was operator error that lend to the knockdown. I was glad I had the coat on. I was wet up to my armpits and the coat kept me warm enough that I didn’t really notice the cold as I bailed and tidied the boat, and even after that as I got underway again and sailed to an anchoring spot.

    That said, the drysuit, which is Gore-tex with no insulation, is terrific for both cold water immersion and in an all-day drenching rain, as long as you have a fleece layer or two underneath. It’s a little toasty if you are rowing hard in it, though. I do find it a real struggle to put on as I am not the contortionist I was when younger and reaching that over-the-shoulder zipper is a challenge.

    As for layers, I stick to various synthetics as I find any kind of wool intensely irritating, even Merino which is touted for its skin-friendliness.
    Alex

    “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.”
    - Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  30. #170
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    196

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Orr View Post
    I believe that on the first capsize we only avoided going completely upside down due to Elijah's quick reactions. A Chebacco on its side floats quite high, leaving the horizontal masts well above the water. Their weight pulls the boat over further, but the masts don't provide any significant flotation at first as only the top touches the water. As the boat keeps rolling over, the masts provide more flotation but by then the hull is past the point of no return and is headed to 180 degrees. I don't think anyone can count on being able to stop the capsize at 90 degrees because they will still be occupied trying to prevent it and will be too late to get on the centreboard. Also many of us are just not fit enough to get there in time - at the time of our capsizes I had sciatica, and couldn't move easily. On the other hand, Elijah was young and fit and poised to act.

    Once we were upside down, self recovery was not a realistic option. If I were capsized by myself in real life, I wouldn't try to right the boat. I'd climb on top where I was out of the water, get a mayday out on the VHF and get my flares ready - assuming I could reach both VHF and flares.
    Jamie, thanks for sharing this experience. In light of this, do you guys think it would be worth raising a mast-float device like Hobie Cats sometimes have? It seems like, for this boat, keeping the angle under 90 could make the difference between minor bailing and an expensive, embarrassing rescue.

  31. #171
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    409

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by csmead View Post
    Jamie, thanks for sharing this experience. In light of this, do you guys think it would be worth raising a mast-float device like Hobie Cats sometimes have? It seems like, for this boat, keeping the angle under 90 could make the difference between minor bailing and an expensive, embarrassing rescue.
    Adding a mast float would be a trade off and seems like it might get in the way of various lines. I think I'd rely on keeping a good watch, early reefing, and avoiding going on in bad conditions instead.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  32. #172
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    409

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Given that it's fall and I think I've gone through all the modifications and changes to the boat, I'll wrap up with an op-ed.

    Here I am watching ships make the turn at Turn Point, on Stuart Island, Wa. those hills/islands in the background are British Columbia (Hi Alex!) It was literally and figuratively the high point of my summer cruise and the zenith of our voyage. I was pleasantly surprised at how well things went with my wife and me in such close quarters for two weeks.

    While sitting at the dock one day, it struck me how much privilege I have (time, college education, money, stable country, social class). I'm lucky to be able to mess around in boats- nobody questions me about my motives, the color of my skin, or my religion (I'm an avowed Neptune-ist)- and am extremely grateful for that. I'm also lucky to be healthy.

    The future is always a mystery, so if I have any advice that I'm sure of is this: Go now.

    If building is your thing, build the boat for the sake of building it. But if adventuring is in your blood, go in the boat you have and you will make it work. It will be fine. You can always improve it in the winter, but go.

    A cruising boat is never done. There's always someplace new you want to visit and perhaps those conditions or what you need to bring will change how the boat is set up. That's fine, but go.



    Past decisions were never the wrong decisions, but they were based on what you knew at the time. Annoying things can be adjusted.

    You'll know more next time. You'll learn something if you go.

    If you just stay home thinking about it, you'll never know.

    See you on the water,
    -Bruce
    Last edited by Bruce Bateau; 11-13-2022 at 10:52 PM.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  33. #173
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    409

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Bruce, that fitting looks peened to me. I don't think it's designed to come apart. As a guess, I'd bet that the rudder stock actually ends lower down and that entire top piece fits into a socket so that it lifts off. Does that domed cap unscrew by any chance?
    Like a bad penny, this thread wakes up again...
    I finally got around to disassembling the rudder post/tiller.

    I went to my neighbor to borrow an angle grinder to grind that brass-looking head off. He asked what I was doing and I showed him the picture of the tiller joint (above). He works with machinists and knew more than me, thank goodness. He said the brass piece was actually a cylinder and not peened and directed me to some pliers.


    Sure enough, I was able to get the shiny silver piece off quite easily.


    After that I used a dowel to tap out the rod and examined the structure. The rod was a uniform thickness, but had a groove routed into it about a tenth of an inch in. The "spiral retaining ring" pictured above was threaded into it to keep the rod from moving horizontally.

    Those darn machinists (like the one who built the boat) are really clever...

    -Bruce
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  34. #174
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    5,182

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    Looks a lot like the split rings they use to retain the top plate on winches. Nice installation!

  35. #175
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    409

    Default Re: Fitting Out for Smallish Boat Cruising

    So I stumbled on John Hartman's video of his Viver Jewell over at Off Center Harbor.

    https://www.offcenterharbor.com/vide...ancois-vivier/

    I know we're all on our own journey, going at our own pace, but wow did he do a fine job. The video shows how thoughtful he was in construction and fitting out.

    The preview is linked above. If you have a subscription, there's 10 more minutes of beautiful story and sailing. Watching the boat in motion says so much more about the story than a picture ever could.

    -Bruce
    Last edited by Bruce Bateau; 11-30-2022 at 08:48 PM.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

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