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Thread: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

  1. #1
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    Default Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    This popped up on FB
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    And

    Both sadly destroyed by artillery fire during WWII
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    As I understand the project was misidentified as a shipping dock by overenthusiastic aerial recon. Nobody thought about why they might have a major loading dock on a two mile long puddle.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    As I understand the project was misidentified as a shipping dock by overenthusiastic aerial recon. Nobody thought about why they might have a major loading dock on a two mile long puddle.
    In addition to which they were in a huge museum hall


    The ships were destroyed by fire in World War II on the night of 31 May 1944.[11] Several shells of the United States Army hit the museum around 8 pm, causing little damage but forcing the German artillery to leave the area. Around two hours later, smoke was seen coming from the museum. There are conflicting views on which side was responsible for the destruction:
    At that time, Allied forces were pursuing the retreating German army northward through the Alban Hills toward Rome. On 28 May a German artillery post was established within 400 feet (120 m) of the museum … An official report filed in Rome later that year described the tragedy as a wilful act on the part of the German soldiers. A German editorial blamed the destruction on American artillery fire. The true story of what happened that night will probably never be known.[11]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemi_ships#Destruction
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    The working hypothesis seems to be that these were not so much ships intended to go from A to B, and were more like floating pleasure palaces which could move towards the centre of the lake and away from the shore.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    The working hypothesis seems to be that these were not so much ships intended to go from A to B, and were more like floating pleasure palaces which could move towards the centre of the lake and away from the shore.
    Much the same a today's practice.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Emperor Caligula's State Galley (1930)

    Quote Originally Posted by pcford View Post
    Much the same a today's practice.
    Nice point!

    Actually Lake Nemi had a rather bloody reputation because of the odd position of the Rex Nemorensis, the priest of Diana who occupied the sacred grove next to her temple.

    The Rex Nemorensis took office by killing the previous occupant of the post in single combat, and he held the post until he in turn was killed by a challenger. The challenge was asserted by cutting a golden bough from a tree in the grove. This forms the opening chapter of one of my favourite books, JG Frazier’s The Golden Bough.

    The challenger had to be an escaped slave. It is recorded that Caligula ordered a challenge as the Rex Nemorensis ​was old.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

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