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Thread: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

  1. #1
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    Default Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    This paper about a new way to make hardened wood really caught my attention, not for the potential of the material to make wooden knives that actually work, but for the potential to make nails out of hardened wood.

    If the nails made that way were easy to obtain and to use, then the potential to use them as non-corroding fasteners in boatbuilding is intriguing. Of course boatbuilding has used wood trunnels for eons, but there might be a possibility that hardened-wood nails could be substituted directly for metal nails.

    The link only gives access to the abstract of the paper, not the full thing, so the details on how they go about hardening the wood are lacking. The abstract does include a graphic, though, which I have included.


    One image in the graphic shows the Brinell hardness of the hardened wood nail to be about 31. That is considerably lower than, say, mild steel, which averages about 120, but it is in the neighbourhood of copper, which averages about 35. And of course copper nails and rivets are used all the time.

    This is something to keep an eye on.
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    Yes, interesting.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    Another possibility: https://www.beck-lignoloc.com/en

    Jeff

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    I've seen a little bit on these. Definitely interesting!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Another possibility: https://www.beck-lignoloc.com/en

    Jeff
    Jeff, I did not know about these. It would be interesting to see a side-by-side comparison between the compressed wood and chemically hardened wood nails
    Alex

    "The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore.
    - Vincent van Gogh

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    The notion of an air powered wood-nail gun is appealing but darned if I can say why. I suppose it's the novelty as much as anything. I just checked into pricing and found a source. As I suspected they are pretty proud of the gun and nails. About $650 US for the gun and a box of nails. That's a pretty big bite but if I was still in the custom furniture fabrication business and found the right project... it'd be paid for in one job. As for my next boat... maybe not.

    As a sideline use, one could slay a whole bunch of vampires in a quick hurry.

    Jeff

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Default Re: Hardened Wood as fasteners?

    The eco housing mob might be (already are?) interested in those nails, lots of wooden framed ouses going up around here.

    Reminds me of some ply my father bought home from some project (no idea what) it was 32 ply, but only 3/8" or 1/2" thick. Extremely difficult to cut with a normal saw, but a metal hack saw worked, slowly.

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