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Thread: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    Default Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    I designed this years ago as a "sacrificial" boat. It was after the 3rd time I had to repair my good 17ft strip-built canoe. My local river has many rock-gardens where there is no one deep channel, so I wanted shallow-draft and "replace-ability" more than purity of form. But it has lasted better than I expected.

    Here's a video of last Friday. The design details are in the Remarks section of the video.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    dfw
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    SIMPLE & ABLE

    th-2 2.jpeg

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Seattle
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    Very nice. I have a 6 hour canoe--- your canoe looks like the older more advanced model of what I have.

    I use a double paddle and tend not to worry about scraping over logs and rocks with a cheap easy to build boat

    Thanks for posting the video
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    Thanks!

    I built a 6-hour canoe too. It's because I was very dissatisfied with that design that I made this one.

    Tried both out in this river -- the boat I designed was much more use.

    But no big deal -- it's the getting out and paddling that's the main thing, not the boat.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    What differences did you make between your design and the 6-hour canoe?
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    Sound Beach, NY
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    Cool. My dad and I built a flat bottom hard chine plywood kayak from Glen-L. We enjoyed the building and paddling.
    I like the music too.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcat View Post
    What differences did you make between your design and the 6-hour canoe?
    They're not related except as a concept. Mine is a clean-sheet design. I used PlyBoats if you can remember that ancient DOS-Based program -- which was easy and simple to use; RIP. I played with the rocker to get the bottom of the stems just-clear of the water with my weight, the boat's weight, and 30 lbs of gear -- all the while checking the projected draft with various beam dimensions. I wanted shallow draft but an un-clunky shape.

    The 6-Hour Canoe has an arbitrary limitation: how much boat can you get out of a 4x16 plywood panel? Thus it's beam is narrow -- almost to kayak dimensions. As a result it draws too much water for this river and gets pinned in the rock-gardens. I tried it out, and didn't like it.

    With my design I threw away that restriction. I had to scarf two 2 x 16 panels. More waste, except I used the leftover in another boat project later. Result: a much better boat for this river. The 6-hour canoe is faster on flatwater because it's narrower, but on these river-runs you're always moving with the current, so flat-water speed doesn't matter as much.

    Dave

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Plywood "Sharpie" Canoe

    As for the double-paddle, I use one too for solo travelling trips where for straight-line paddling it is much more efficient. And a big benefit in a headwind.

    But in a rapid, maneuvering is done with draw-strokes and pry-strokes. The single-blade is better for that.

    Just to beat the obvious to death, we maneuver in a rapid by back-paddling. We go slower than the current. This allows much more time to pick a path. I slide forward until I'm up against the center thwart to unweight the stern. This allows it to be swiveled easily, and we can back-ferry right, and change to a back-ferry left, with little trouble.

    And that's what we do -- choose a path, back-ferry to get there, always moving more slowly than the current, and wiggle and slither a never-straight trail amongst the rocks.

    These rapids are class I, with the occasional class II. The boat looks primitive with its hard-chines, but does quite well. I can reach way out to the side, do a hard draw-stroke, and move the whole boat sideways. It's the rocker, and the rounded chines, which allow that.

    Dave
    Last edited by Dave Hadfield; 10-18-2021 at 09:43 AM.

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