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Thread: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

  1. #1
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    Default Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    zooom


    https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/lucy/overview/index

    Lucy: The First Mission to the Trojan Asteroids
    animation of movement of inner planets, Jupiter and Jupiter's Trojans
    During the course of its mission, Lucy will fly by seven Jupiter Trojans. This time-lapsed animation shows the movements of the inner planets (Mercury, brown; Venus, white; Earth, blue; Mars, red), Jupiter (orange), and the two Trojan swarms (green) during the course of the Lucy mission.
    Credits: Astronomical Institute of CAS/Petr Scheirich (used with permission)

    Time capsules from the birth of our Solar System more than 4 billion years ago, the swarms of Trojan asteroids associated with Jupiter are thought to be remnants of the primordial material that formed the outer planets. The Trojans orbit the Sun in two loose groups, with one group leading ahead of Jupiter in its path, the other trailing behind. Clustered around the two Lagrange points equidistant from the Sun and Jupiter, the Trojans are stabilized by the Sun and its largest planet in a gravitational balancing act. These primitive bodies hold vital clues to deciphering the history of the solar system.

    Lucy will be the first space mission to study the Trojans. The mission takes its name from the fossilized human ancestor (called “Lucy” by her discoverers) whose skeleton provided unique insight into humanity's evolution. Likewise, the Lucy mission will revolutionize our knowledge of planetary origins and the formation of the solar system.

    Lucy will launch in October 2021 and, with boosts from Earth's gravity, will complete a 12-year journey to eight different asteroids — a Main Belt asteroid and seven Trojans, four of which are members of “two-for-the-price-of-one” binary systems. Lucy’s complex path will take it to both clusters of Trojans and give us our first close-up view of all three major types of bodies in the swarms (so-called C-, P- and D-types).








    During its 12-year mission, Lucy will rely on two giant solar arrays, which will expand outward like folding fans shortly after launch. Its unique looping trajectory will carry it farther from the sun than any solar-powered spacecraft has ever flown before.

    The design is based on the same design that currently powers the InSight Mars lander, only much larger. The solar panels will provide about 500 watts of power while the spacecraft is flying past the Trojan asteroids, Katie Oakman, Lucy structures and mechanisms lead at Lockheed Martin Space, which built the spacecraft, said during a news conference held on Thursday (Oct. 14).
    Last edited by LeeG; 10-16-2021 at 06:21 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    The article I read (and can't find now) mentioned that not only was the Lucy fossil* the inspiration for the first mission to the Trojans but that the Beatles tune, Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, was the inspiration for the logo. I think the diamonds is a reference to the solar panels design.



    *
    Paleoanthropologist Donald C. Johanson is the man who found the woman that shook up our family tree. In 1974, Johanson discovered a 3.2 million-year-old fossil of a female skeleton in Ethiopia that would forever change our understanding of human origins. Dubbed Australopithecus afarensis, she became known to the world as Lucy.
    TIME
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    Possibly why Scott Manley posted this video which explains and helps to visualize the Lagrange points.

    'When I leave I don't know what I'm hoping to find. When I leave I don't know what I'm leaving behind...'

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    GM shoulda named a car the LaGrange.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    if this were a manned mission
    would we refer to the crew
    as trojan man!?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mahan View Post
    The article I read (and can't find now) mentioned that not only was the Lucy fossil* the inspiration for the first mission to the Trojans but that the Beatles tune, Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, was the inspiration for the logo. I think the diamonds is a reference to the solar panels design.



    * TIME
    The song is the reason she was named Lucy.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    All that and……..trump, anti-science and anti-vacine.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    ...well, there sure won't be any life there, considering they're trojans...

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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    I hope I didnít start this horsing around?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Launch to Trojan asteroids this morn

    folded up



    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-58927969

    The spacecraft shares a lot of engineering heritage with Nasa's New Horizon's mission, which made the first - and to date only - flyby of Pluto in 2015.
    Lucy carries updated versions of some of New Horizons' main instruments.
    A big difference is the power source. Whereas the Pluto probe drew its energy from a nuclear battery, Lucy is flying with two, fan-like solar panels.
    These "wings" are huge, over 7m in diameter. They have to be that big to generate sufficient electricity to drive the spacecraft's systems at the more dimly lit distance of Jupiter's orbit.
    "When we're near Earth, those wings have about 18,000 watts of power. That would be equivalent to powering up my house and a couple of my neighbours'," explained Katie Oakman, from spacecraft manufacturer Lockheed Martin.
    "However, when we fly Lucy out to the trojan asteroids, we only have about 500 watts of power. That would only light a few light bulbs, and it wouldn't be enough to power up my microwave in the morning to warm my coffee."
    Fortunately, Lucy's instruments only need 82 watts to do their job.

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