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Thread: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Does Oughtred have an alternate sail plan for Eun Mara? My understanding is the headsail on this type was self-tending and set flying.

    Waters are the Connecticut coast, Chesapeake and maybe Maine… so, Sharpies. Lots of variations on the rigs, just trying to decide what’s best for my needs.

    I’m down to a final 4 on designs. Rig particulars can be worked out. I just need to choose one and start setting up. 18’ Chapelle Oyster Skiff, 19’ Ohio Sharpie, Chapelle 24-Foot Sharpie, Parker’s 25’ Maryland Fishing Sharpie. Need to figure out how much more I’d be biting off by building one of the bigger boats.
    I would love to see one of the Maryland Fishing Sharpies' built, if only because it's different than your usual sharpie. I have Parker's book and also bought the plans. I was a bit disappointed that they didn't have any more info on sail dimensions, rigging or anything else that isn't in the book, so if you have the book, I wouldn't bother with the larger plans (unless you want bigger sheets). It would be a big project, but what a fun family sailing and sail-camping boat!

    On a completely different take: a fast-build, best-bang-for-the-buck, sharpie might be the Michalak Laguna. It is definitely NOT traditional in rig or construction, but would get a family out sailing fast. I think they've all been built with different interior seating arrangements to suit the owners. The hull shape is traditional skiff/sharpie, the rest is Bolger/Michalak features. I have the plans and they are very clear.

    https://duckworks.com/laguna-plans/

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    The Laguna is a good idea, and probably pretty easy to build. It uses two sails of the same size, two of Jims 75 sq. ft. balanced lugs, which are easily made. Easily trailered and built without epoxy.



    She isn't a traditional build, but it doesn't look bad -

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by timo4352 View Post
    I can tell you that balanced jib works quite well... it is self tending, so you really don't have to play with it at all when tacking, unless you want to...
    Getting the "balance" right takes a few tries in my experience, but not a deal breaker for sure....
    Attachment 96934
    I see that your old boat is for sale on CL, Charlotte NC.
    https://charlotte.craigslist.org/boa...388259905.html

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    I like Laguna, and have looked at her several times. Just not the right design for this build.

    Culler’s Sharptown Barge and the biggest Good Little Skiff Dixie Belle keep coming back up, and I do keep thinking on the big Atkin skiff. But I’m going to focus on the ‘top 4’ for now.

    The big Chapelle 24’er probably is the most appealing, but the scantlings are absolutely massive. It’s really a lot of boat built to traditional workboat ruggedness. Probably too much boat. But I’ve printed the plans large and daydream.

    The 25’ Maryland Fishing Sharpie holds a ton of interest. I found the original Chapelle drawings in ‘Paper 25’ today (larger boat that Parker based his plans on…) and will take a closer look tomorrow. One thing Chapelle notes is that the jib and bowsprit are for “light air”, so it seems the rig will balance as a pirogue without the jib. Even though Reuel Parker has drawn the plans for plywood and epoxy, a timber build would be pretty straight forward. I’m going to do a material takeoff of this boat and the Ohio Sharpie tomorrow to get an idea of what that additional 6’ of length will mean in cost and time. About the only thing I’m not keen on is the dagger board.

    The Chapelle Oystering Skiff and Parker’s Small Ohio Sharpie are the ‘reasonable’ boats to build. Handsome and workmanlike, and straightforward to put together. Both would suit, and be fun builds.

    Choices, eh?

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Here’s Chapelle’s drawing. Paper is available on Project Gutenberg.
    BB426B4D-43ED-4B5D-9540-640DB53976E5.jpg

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Nice looking boat!

    Looks to me like she might balance under foresail alone, but with main and foresail it looks to me like the dagger board is to far forward to balance without the jib.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Etdbob View Post
    Nice looking boat!

    Looks to me like she might balance under foresail alone, but with main and foresail it looks to me like the dagger board is to far forward to balance without the jib.
    Hard to say without seeing the entire rig, but the profile lines is deceiving. The LWL isn’t parallel to the baseline an runs from the heel of the stem back, with little of the forward hull below waterline. Then there’s that huge skeg. Without doing a cutout and balance, I’d say CLR is a bit aft of the dagger board, near the foot of the mainmast (mizzen) and she’d balance under main/fore. I think we’d need an additional mast step just forward of the dagger board case to plant the foremast and sail under a single sail. Hmmm…

    Now you have me thinking…

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Here’s Reuel Parker’s 25’ version for reference to see the entire rig. I need to reread his remarks on this design in his book and see what, if anything, he mentioned about the rig.
    F44CB159-5624-464E-9FA3-0F4E3EC9FAC4.jpg

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    It wouid be interesting to discuss reefing these sprit leg of muttons with a traditionally oriented sail maker.

    I can see leaving the sprit in place, shifting the snotter and doing a triangular reef, or doing one parallel to the foot and having the appropriate system set up on the sprit to take a clew that is now inboard a foot or so. Maybe a little purchase with a ring if you don't want track. In either case you will have a loose bundle on the foot which can be dealt with.

    You get used to daggerboards. They are clean, keep drag down, and easy to shape. Terribly traditional in the Delaware and New Jersey areas where they were on most gunning boats like sneakboxes, duckers etc. It's a place with sand rather than rock, but I've also used them on high performance fast boats like canoes, catamarans. People worry about tearing out trunks, worst I've done is ding the board . Mostly you need to remember to bring the board along when you trail. You would need a plug of some kind if you row as the board isn't usually right for rowing.

    Probably the best thing you can do to improve performance on any of these boats is shape the daggerboard/ centerboard and if you use a CB design the trunk so you hoist from the top corner, and use a drop down or kick up rudder of some kind, also shaped.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Reefing is the hair, eh Ben? Reaching out to a traditional sailmaker is great advice.

    Considering only the leg of mutton rig, it’s vertical reef with a wad of sail against the mast, or a reef parallel to the foot with a wad of sail down low. I think I’d manage the sprit boom with two shoulders at the clew end and different size beckets for dealing with a reduced sail.

    But I keep coming back to what you mentioned earlier… I don’t think these rigs were reefed much. If you look at period photography rather than drawings (either historic record or modern designs) you don’t see many instances of reef systems on the boats - New Haven or Chesapeake. No reef points parallel with the foot or batten and brail along the luff. There’s plenty of mention of the NH boats utilizing a third mast step to set fore- or mainmast for a single sail rig… either to set a ‘winter’ rig ashore before heading out or to reef at sea… and I think this became preferable to dealing with the earlier vertical reef. My reading about the fisheries also state that tonging wasn’t done in rough weather… which makes complete sense and may have negated the practical need for the oyster boats to reduce sail quickly.

    The rigs for the Great Lakes, North Carolina and Florida boats have fairly straightforward reefing schedules designed in due to the uses and waters for which they were built.

    I have some studying to do on center- and dagger boards!

    R
    Last edited by RyanGillnet; 10-13-2021 at 08:33 AM.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...e12&highlight=

    In post #409 on page 12 of this thread I showed my reefing setup...
    Maybe it will be useful to you.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    I’ve been working on some reefing options for the double leg of mutton sharpie rig. Nothing too extraordinary here, except I’ve read about skipping a section of sail equal to the depth of reef above the snotter when lacing to the mast. This allows the sail to be hauled down to the reef tack without trying to work around the snotter. Sprits move forward when shipped to the reef clew. Main (mizzen) can be sheeted as with full sails, but foresail sheets need to be led to new fairleads. Center of Effort moves down and slightly foreword.

    63864475-153B-4016-9743-AFD7AA9294AA.jpg
    76A3D733-288A-4250-AD0F-674F13843C4A.jpg

    I have a few more ways to reduce sail worked out. It’s interesting to work through the procedure and drawing it out is revealing.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Iíve been working on some reefing options for the double leg of mutton sharpie rig. Nothing too extraordinary here, except Iíve read about skipping a section of sail equal to the depth of reef above the snotter when lacing to the mast. This allows the sail to be hauled down to the reef tack without trying to work around the snotter.
    I had a similar problem with the snotter on my sprit rig and I solved it with what I call a snotter pendant. Basically I hang my snotter turning block from a Dyneema pendant attached to the main halyard so that when the sail is lowered, the correct geometry is preserved. This got rid of a little thumb cleat on the mast which was a major source of frustration. I've got some pictures and explanation on my website which is a bit more centralized than my posts scattered around the forum.

    You could do something similar with your leg-o-mutton if you had two mast travelers tied to the same pendant. Lower the halyard to the reef position and attach the sprit boom to the new clew and higher mast traveler. This would let you lace the luff to the mast and get rid of any thumb cleats. I would use a line with little stretch and make the mast travelers toggle so they can be easily removed.

    Looking forward to seeing your boat come to life!

    63864475-153B-4016-9743-AFD7AA9294AA.jpg

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    I like it! Quite a few ways to manage this, but with reefing parallel to the foot, there is a bit of foolin’ around to do. Especially with two sails. And needing to leave the helm. I have a way to keep the sprit extended aft, which would keep the foresail sheets in place, but the rear of the riggamarole is basically the same.

    I think this rig as-drawn will stay fairly balanced by reducing the main (mizzen) first and going with full foresail and reefed main.

    I’m also working through the various vertical reefing systems. I think I can get both sails reefed from the cockpit… Not sure how much effect having the reef’d bit of sail against the mast will have though…

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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    9E442D1F-14B1-44B0-9CA5-3237B7B1B197.jpg

    Ryan, I like that you are going for a traditional boat form. But again I say just follow and or buy your modern adaptation of a traditional rig from https://bandbyachtdesigns.com.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
    -The Dude-

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    That would be eminently practical, Matt. But I like to make things and I'm a student of history, so...

    I do like what B&B has to say about the cat-ketch rig, though!

    Going under full foresail and reduced main (mizzen):
    Sharpie Sail Plan Reef at Foot 4.jpg

    The COE moves a bit forward. Now, these are big reefs. Like 36" parallel to the foot of the sail. So a smaller reef in the mizzen may not increase the lead as much. But the other issue is the sprit moving forward. As-drawn, the sprit will foul the foresail. Now the snotter could be moved up the mast to avoid the foresail, but we'd need to be something like 6+ feet above the rail. We'd need the snotter on a halyard or a pennant to haul the snotter up. But by using an outhaul to attach the reef clew on the sprit - or, alternately, a thumb cleat to catch the reef clew becket - we can keep the sprit as it is under full sail.

    The sprit/foresail interference isn't something I had considered until I drew it out.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    That would be eminently practical, Matt. But I like to make things and I'm a student of history, so...

    I do like what B&B has to say about the cat-ketch rig, though!

    Going under full foresail and reduced main (mizzen):

    The COE moves a bit forward. Now, these are big reefs. Like 36" parallel to the foot of the sail. So a smaller reef in the mizzen may not increase the lead as much. But the other issue is the sprit moving forward. As-drawn, the sprit will foul the foresail. Now the snotter could be moved up the mast to avoid the foresail, but we'd need to be something like 6+ feet above the rail. We'd need the snotter on a halyard or a pennant to haul the snotter up. But by using an outhaul to attach the reef clew on the sprit - or, alternately, a thumb cleat to catch the reef clew becket - we can keep the sprit as it is under full sail.

    The sprit/foresail interference isn't something I had considered until I drew it out.
    I'd work out a place to hook the new clew when reefing. Maybe a biner lashed to the spirit, or if you go traditional a lashing line with a bee hole to keep it in place. With a tackle on the snotter you would slack the sprit, lower the sail (mark your halyard), tie or hook the tack down, hook the clew, tie in the reef, set up the sprit and sail away. If you do the mizzen first, you may need to lower the main to keep the boat pointing into the wind. Not a problem if you reef the main first as a firmly sheeted mizzen will keep your boat into the wind.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    This will be relevant in a bit...

    From Chapelle's American Small Sailing Craft regarding a 26'10" Tonging Sharpie of the 1870's (tiny print on the plate that took me forever to decipher... )

    Masting Rule of 1879
    Average Beam, between Deck and Chine at 0, a 26'
    foremast. Mainmast 2'0" less in length.
    Some builders multiplied the greatest beam
    on Deck by 3.6 for length of foremast, but this
    was apparently for maximum rig in a working
    boat.

    The number of brails used on a single sail varied
    from 2 to 5. Brails were not commonly employed
    in the 1890's when two reef bands in each sail
    became practice.

    Topping lifts were not used in all boats.

    Wooden mast hoops replaced lacing before 1879.

    ??tackle Purchase on mainsheet.

    Sprits were usually placed on opposite sides of
    the sails, fore & main.

    The snotter fall was on the mast side of the sprit
    and belayed to a cleat on the fore side of mast, or on
    a cleat on the side of the mast opposite to the
    sprit. The snotter sometimes was made up on an
    iron mast hoop, instead of an eye around the mast.

    The halyard fall belayed on a cleat on the side
    of the mast opposite to the sprit. The brails usually
    belayed on this side as well.

    Topping Lift fall belayed on a cleat on the sprit
    side of the mast.

    .
    The single parts of the fore-sheet belayed on cleats
    inside of coamings, port & starboard.
    Fall of mainsheet belayed on mooring cleat or on a
    coaming cleat.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Depending on how smoothly the brail works, both the snotter and brail leads could go to the helm and you could reef without going forward. I do wonder what all that bunched sail at the luff will do...
    Vertical Reefing.jpg
    Vertical Reefed.jpg

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Depending on how smoothly the brail works, both the snotter and brail leads could go to the helm and you could reef without going forward. I do wonder what all that bunched sail at the luff will do...
    Nothing good if trying to go to windward.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    I see an awful lot of baggy windage exactly where and when you least want it. Also, any time you change direction on a line you get friction and you've lots of corners being turned there.

    Nothing wrong with thinking outside the box, keep it up. On the other hand sometimes there is a reason things end up outside the box.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    I agree. Not really outside the box... this was a traditional method for reefing these rigs. Seems like the brail was eventually abandoned in favor of dropping the sail and tying in the reef as it was re-hoisted. Still, a lot of baggy sail on the luff. Interesting to note that this was mostly used on larger sharpies. Maybe because of the mast and overall size of the rig on bigger boats the brailed sail made less of a negative effect...

    Interesting to note... the photos I'm finding of working sharpies in Connecticut and the Chesapeake using leg of mutton rigs often show no reefing, either on the luff or foot. As Ben says above, I get the sense that these rigs weren't often reefed. Oyster tonging in particular was a fair weather fishery, so it may not have been a critical design consideration for the working boats.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    I wish I could find a better copy of this photo. North Carolina sharpie with a reef in. Chapelle's Paper 25, image courtesy of Wirth Monroe
    North Carolina Reefed.jpg

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    My sharpie cat-yawl has a laced main sail. I experimented with various ways to reef, including hanging the snottier from the masthead, and gave it all up!

    In the end, I simply use a snotter looped around the mast, as shown by Culler in his book Skiffs and Schooners.

    To reef, I put her in irons with a mizzen sheet pulled in tight. This thankfully keeps her head dead into the wind no matter what.

    Then I reach up and unhook the main sheet from the end of the boom, which is just a spring carabiner. No need to keep it hooked up, and far less to go wrong with the sail free.

    Then I need to stand or at least kneel on the foredeck to release the snotter. The boom is lowered to the roof of the boat in my case, where there is a rack to hold it. It's 1-1/2" square and about 14 feet long, laminated up from two pieces, and isn't heavy.

    After releasing the snotter I simply unloop it from around the mast, then lower the sail all the way down.
    I find that messing with half a flapping sail is a royal pain and potentially dangerous, especially is fickle winds. Just lower it all the way down.
    I my boat, I sit inside the slot top cabin on the side benches and tie the reef points in at leisure,
    completely out of the wind!

    Anyway, then I clip the clew of the sail to the appropriate ring-bolt on the boom. I have three, one for full sail and two for the reefed positions. I found it very difficult to deal with the snotter with front of the sprit boom sticking way out forward, so different positions on the boom for the clew was the way to go.

    Raise the sail, loop the snotter around the mast, grab the end of the sprit boom, put the snotter in the slot cut in the end of the boom and haul it tight. The snotter is made fast right on the end of the boom, not taken down to a cleat on deck.

    Then clip the sheet back on, and sail away. It may soud complicated and awkward but it really is quite simple with a minimum of gear, and it's all made very civil by the slot top cabin and mizzen.

    Under two reefs.


    242388501_3094640860855554_2375316354146161128_n (2).jpg

    I think I'd start simple, maybe just looping the snotter around the mast as I do for starters, and get more complicated as experience dictates.


    I did try the method Bolger used on Black Skimmer, where the snotter is hung from the end of the boom. It's looped about the mast and cleated to a block on the boom. Simple as it gets.
    I found difficulty keeping the boom from twisting when hung this way, but I didn't experiment much with it.

    I do brail the sail to the mast at night, rather than lower away and have it clogging up the cabin or foredeck. -

    SAM_9449.jpg

    To trailer the boat with a laced sail I lower it, tie the lacing in a tight bundle in three places, with a different colored line in front so I know the orientation of the bundle. Then lift out the 22-1/2 foot mast, which I made from a 35 year old Doug Fir tree. I don't know how other folk manage this, but I sure wasn't about to lace that sail on every time I went sailing!

    SAM_9346.jpg

    To set it up I lay the mast on the boat, put the bundled lacing over the foot of the mast and push it up a few feet. Then stand on the foredeck and man-handle the mast into place.

    Eh, no matter what you decide to do or build, you'd probably better go out into the woods mast hunting now. It will need some time to dry. I cut several while I was at it and have them stored in my hay loft.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by The Jeff View Post
    I had a similar problem with the snotter on my sprit rig and I solved it with what I call a snotter pendant. Basically I hang my snotter turning block from a Dyneema pendant attached to the main halyard so that when the sail is lowered, the correct geometry is preserved. This got rid of a little thumb cleat on the mast which was a major source of frustration. I've got some pictures and explanation on my website which is a bit more centralized than my posts scattered around the forum.

    You could do something similar with your leg-o-mutton if you had two mast travelers tied to the same pendant. Lower the halyard to the reef position and attach the sprit boom to the new clew and higher mast traveler. This would let you lace the luff to the mast and get rid of any thumb cleats. I would use a line with little stretch and make the mast travelers toggle so they can be easily removed.

    Looking forward to seeing your boat come to life!

    63864475-153B-4016-9743-AFD7AA9294AA.jpg
    Jeff... just wanted to say that your writeup about reefing Moga on your website is great. Good on ya' for working through it and getting a system that works for you. This stuff is fun, eh?

    R

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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Etdbob - neat boat and great writeup on your reefing system. I like it. And you're right... I do need to go mast hunting. Not sure what's appropriate as supplied by the forests of the commonwealth though...

    Maybe... a Christmas tree farm? Hmmm....

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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Depending on how smoothly the brail works, both the snotter and brail leads could go to the helm and you could reef without going forward. I do wonder what all that bunched sail at the luff will do.
    Well, that's the way I do it and for me it works well. In a 15 ft sharpie with a 4 ft beam, being able to reef from the helm sure beats going forward in heavy weather. Unfortunately, I don't have a photo of the sail reefed, but with enough reef points the bunching is tolerably neat and works well enough in a craft that shouldn't be sailed too close to the wind anyway.

    DSC00138.jpeg

    Andrew

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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Andrew, you had a great write up of your system on another thread. Thanks for that and this. Do you have a batten? Think it would make any difference one way or another on boats under 20'?

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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Andrew, you had a great write up of your system on another thread. Thanks for that and this. Do you have a batten? Think it would make any difference one way or another on boats under 20'?
    Ryan,

    You mean along the line of reef grommets? No, there's just a strip of Dacron tape, the same stuff that reinforces the luff. Seems to provide enough stiffening to keep the reef luff straight. I have a short downhaul that I use to tighten the luff. You can see it hanging down. I jump forward and tie it off, only takes a second.

    BTW, you'll notice that the individual brails are slack at the foot of the sail and get tighter toward the head, this was to compensate for the stretch in the main brail line.

    Andrew

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    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Etdbob View Post
    To trailer the boat with a laced sail I lower it, tie the lacing in a tight bundle in three places, with a different colored line in front so I know the orientation of the bundle. Then lift out the 22-1/2 foot mast, which I made from a 35 year old Doug Fir tree. I don't know how other folk manage this, but I sure wasn't about to lace that sail on every time I went sailing!

    SAM_9346.jpg

    To set it up I lay the mast on the boat, put the bundled lacing over the foot of the mast and push it up a few feet. Then stand on the foredeck and man-handle the mast into place.
    Do you have any trouble with the lacing getting overlapped making it hard to raise the sail? I'm currently using toggling robands that attach in a diagonal fashion and I find the knots can get bunched up. Your method looks pretty quick and easy and I'm thinking it might be worth a try next year.


    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet
    Jeff... just wanted to say that your writeup about reefing Moga on your website is great. Good on ya' for working through it and getting a system that works for you. This stuff is fun, eh?
    It has been fun, but I am getting a tad sick of changing stuff every year in the search for a perfect boat. At least it's getting closer though! Currently I've got a huge hole cut in the sternsheets for a new hatch. The old one was right down by the floor and let water seep through after a few inches got in the boat. One of the rare times following the building plans too closely was a bad idea.
    Last edited by The Jeff; 10-20-2021 at 11:46 AM.

  31. #101
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Loon Lake, Washington
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    279

    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    "The Jeff",

    Nope, no trouble with the lacing at all. I use the Bolger method of lacing on a sail.

    Bolger lacing.jpg

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Loon Lake, Washington
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    279

    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Etdbob - neat boat and great writeup on your reefing system. I like it. And you're right... I do need to go mast hunting. Not sure what's appropriate as supplied by the forests of the commonwealth though...

    Maybe... a Christmas tree farm? Hmmm....
    Anything long and straight! Not a Christmas tree farm. But seriously, use what you can find growing in a thick stand to make 'em tall and skinny. Captain Joshua Slocum made good use of slender banana trees cut in the Solomon Islands, don't be picky. Know any farmers with wood lots? Relatives with a few acres? Can you cut firewood on state land?


    I found many while out mountain biking nearby timber lands. So I took a saw with me and cut a tree down every trip. Limed them and stashed 'em in the woods. After I had three on the ground I stated taking my draw knife with me and peeling them. Finally at the end of the summer I went with my jeep and picked 'em up. Two are in my barn still. I cut one down for a mizzen. My main mast came from my own 40 acres.

    If you were local I'd let you have my sticks!

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Fiddletown, on Vineyard Lane
    Posts
    3,772

    Default Re: Flat-Iron / Sharpie Design Choice

    Bump. I love sailing skiffs. Anything new on this?
    Re-naming straits as necessary.

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