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Thread: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

  1. #1
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    Default Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Hello -- Sorry in advance for what's likely a wall of text.

    After moving to Boston from central Pennsylvania two years ago, I've fallen in love with sailing. As an avid DIY-er and maker-of-things, even though it's maybe not the most economical choice, I want to make my own little sailboat rather than buy one if I can.

    My ability to do this is both hampered and enabled by my not owning a car. Enabled because the only place I have to work on carpentry projects is the offstreet parking space behind my house, but hampered because it needs to be light enough to be towed by an electric bicycle. Per the research I've done, heavy duty bicycle trailers like those made by Surly and Bikes at Work are safe to load about 300 pounds on before things get sketchy, but ideally I'd like to not get too close to that so that I don't have to worry too much about being able to brake effectively, not to mention having to (wo)manhandle the thing into the water. To that end, I've been researching plans for boats around the 150-175 pound hull weight range, that would be able to be constructed in an 18x8 foot space. Since so much of that research ended up just taking me to old threads on this very forum, I figured I'd probably be best served by just asking for help here. There are several designs that look promising, and I was hoping that y'all could assist me in determining the relative pros and cons among them, if there's some obvious option that I missed, and warn me if any of these wouldn't be up to the challenge of sailing/camping in the Boston Harbor/Massachusetts Bay/Cape Cod coastal region. I expect I'll be mostly single-handing, with an occasional guest or two.


    • Ian Oughtred's Whilly Tern: One of the first boats I found in this list, and in my opinion the prettiest. Additionally, I've heard that Oughtred provides fantastic plans for first time builders. However, I've seen several messages on this forum mentioning that it's uncomfortably small, and that the Tirrik is the all around better option. I'm confused by this, given I've also seen nothing but good things said about similarly sized peapods. Is there some difference I'm overlooking that makes the Whilly Tern inferior to, say, the 15-foot Beach Pea? Unfortunately the Tirrik is getting a bit too large and heavy.
    • The aforementioned Beach Pea, or some other Peapod design? I was leaning towards the Tern because it seems to be lighter for the size than any Peapod design I've seen so far.
    • Ross Lillistone's Phoenix 3: Lots of the design decisions here speak to the engineer in me, and the amount of information provided to aid in its construction is a big vote in its favor for an inexperienced builder. Literally the only reason this isn't my obvious choice is that I think I prefer the looks of open boats, especially Oughtred's double enders and the HV16.
    • Eric Hvalsoe's HV16: Gorgeous, but I'm nervous about the description of the plans as requiring lofting. Should I be? I wish there were study plans. It's also the narrowest option here, would it be less safe/stable in coastal waters?
    • Antonio Dias's Harrier: An option I've seen suggested in discussions around boats of this size, but for the life of me I can't find a dry weight for it.
    • Chesapeake Light Craft's Northeaster: Available as a kit if I wanted to go that way, and very light -- they literally have a photo of someone moving it by bike on their website.


    Again, sorry for asking what are likely incredibly basic questions, and thank you in advance for any help you can give.
    Last edited by ErikaK; 09-24-2021 at 02:53 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Look up Fossil Fool on YouTube. He built a boat that is its own trailer and tows it behind a folding bike which then fits into the foredeck. Very slick. he has a build thread here on the forum too.


    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...r-Bike-Sailing
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    EDIT: I see BBSebens has already referred you to the same thread.

    Welcome to the forum. I don't have much specific to say about your questions but they immediately brought to mind this thread on a different Lillistone design adapted for bike sailing:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...r-Bike-Sailing

    There is a wealth of information here, and if you haven't already figured this out, it's much easier to find using a google advanced search constrained to the domain forum.woodenboat.com than using the forum's own search box.
    Last edited by nrs5000; 09-24-2021 at 03:53 PM.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    I haul a lot of stuff up to about 150 lb with my ebike, but my 300 lb skiff is just too much so I agree on your weight estimates. A third vote to check out Fossil Fool, his methods for integrating the wheels into sockets and the built-in tow bar are very clever. His goal was also to be able to pack the bike and towing kit into the boat, so if you do not need to do that then a more normal trailer should work fine. He also built the boat from G10, normal wood construction would be light and work fine also.

    As to the boat choices they all look good to me. You already mentioned some of the tradeoffs: CLC northeaster would be one end of the build ease spectrum supplied as a kit, the HV 16 probably the other end. How fast you want to get onto the water, vs how much you want to learn along the way.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    I don't have anything to add regarding bike trailering or light sailboats, but Angus Rowing has a bunch of info about bicycle towing that might be useful:

    https://angusadventures.com/adventur...book/trailers/

    https://angusadventures.com/expedition/rowedtripexped/
    - Chris

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Welcome to the forum, Erika!
    A quick note about double enders. Because they are pointy at both ends a 15' DE will be smaller in usable room and maybe capacity than a similar 15' transom boat. I have a 15' DE CLC Skerry and with no side seats-benches, it is uncomfortable and cramped for my old bones.
    Dories with a narrow tombstone transom are much like DEs.
    Choosing a sailing rig is fun. The balanced lug is popular for a good reason, I love mine. Others prefer the sprit sail etc.
    Look at built in flotation, some will barely stay afloat after capsize and others are much easier to self rescue. Note that as a builder you have the option of adding flotation tanks.
    Some example capsize videos follow:
    Linkey; Here is a video of it barely being recovered in calm water. Note he dumps the rig. If you could make enclosed side benches it might be, IMO, a contender. Dunno if there is room though. Maybe put air tanks under the thwarts and enlarge the end tanks?
    Linkey; A sail-n-oar boat being recovered with it's rig still up just to show what is possible.
    And another; https://youtu.be/snGsprpUqMw?t=8
    Oughtred Arctic Tern; https://youtu.be/qFmI8-katUM?t=6 or Capsize test 1 - Bing video
    Last edited by Autonomous; 09-24-2021 at 05:58 PM.
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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    It's been my experience that many peapods don't tack well, because they have a long, straight keel. It helps if they are heavy. Erik's boat is surprisingly stable, and sails well.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    The Goat Island Skiff, if you cleave to the specifications, finishes out at about 140#. Then the question becomes rigging a connection to your trailer... so it'd handle a 15.5' boat.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by ErikaK View Post
    Hello -- Sorry in advance for what's likely a wall of text.

    After moving to Boston from central Pennsylvania two years ago, I've fallen in love with sailing. As an avid DIY-er and maker-of-things, even though it's maybe not the most economical choice, I want to make my own little sailboat rather than buy one if I can.

    My ability to do this is both hampered and enabled by my not owning a car. Enabled because the only place I have to work on carpentry projects is the offstreet parking space behind my house, but hampered because it needs to be light enough to be towed by an electric bicycle. Per the research I've done, heavy duty bicycle trailers like those made by Surly and Bikes at Work are safe to load about 300 pounds on before things get sketchy, but ideally I'd like to not get too close to that so that I don't have to worry too much about being able to brake effectively, not to mention having to (wo)manhandle the thing into the water. To that end, I've been researching plans for boats around the 150-175 pound hull weight range, that would be able to be constructed in an 18x8 foot space. Since so much of that research ended up just taking me to old threads on this very forum, I figured I'd probably be best served by just asking for help here. There are several designs that look promising, and I was hoping that y'all could assist me in determining the relative pros and cons among them, if there's some obvious option that I missed, and warn me if any of these wouldn't be up to the challenge of sailing/camping in the Boston Harbor/Massachusetts Bay/Cape Cod coastal region. I expect I'll be mostly single-handing, with an occasional guest or two.


    • Ian Oughtred's Whilly Tern: One of the first boats I found in this list, and in my opinion the prettiest. Additionally, I've heard that Oughtred provides fantastic plans for first time builders. However, I've seen several messages on this forum mentioning that it's uncomfortably small, and that the Tirrik is the all around better option. I'm confused by this, given I've also seen nothing but good things said about similarly sized peapods. Is there some difference I'm overlooking that makes the Whilly Tern inferior to, say, the 15-foot Beach Pea? Unfortunately the Tirrik is getting a bit too large and heavy.
    • The aforementioned Beach Pea, or some other Peapod design? I was leaning towards the Tern because it seems to be lighter for the size than any Peapod design I've seen so far.
    • Ross Lillistone's Phoenix 3: Lots of the design decisions here speak to the engineer in me, and the amount of information provided to aid in its construction is a big vote in its favor for an inexperienced builder. Literally the only reason this isn't my obvious choice is that I think I prefer the looks of open boats, especially Oughtred's double enders and the HV16.
    • Eric Hvalsoe's HV16: Gorgeous, but I'm nervous about the description of the plans as requiring lofting. Should I be? I wish there were study plans. It's also the narrowest option here, would it be less safe/stable in coastal waters?
    • Antonio Dias's Harrier: An option I've seen suggested in discussions around boats of this size, but for the life of me I can't find a dry weight for it.
    • Chesapeake Light Craft's Northeaster: Available as a kit if I wanted to go that way, and very light -- they literally have a photo of someone moving it by bike on their website.


    Again, sorry for asking what are likely incredibly basic questions, and thank you in advance for any help you can give.

    First time builders always have lots of questions and some questions also have answers. A a designer, I admire Ross Lillyistones boats as good looking, simple and seem to perform well. As for your choice of Phoenix 3, Many will like it but for me, I don't like boomless mainsails. The boomless spritsail is common going back many years as a work boat with several advantages over other rigs for working pots and single handed seafood work. Lots of them built as replicas in this area and I've sailed many. For a knockabout day sailor, the advantages become difficulties relative to a sail with a foot rigged boom. Ross has the Fleet which is better for a first time builder and sailor in my estimation. Others may likely disagree.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by Autonomous View Post
    Linkey; Here is a video of it barely being recovered in calm water. Note he dumps the rig. If you could make enclosed side benches it might be, IMO, a contender. Dunno if there is room though. Maybe put air tanks under the thwarts and enlarge the end tanks?


    Eesh. Most of my sailing so far has been in Sunfish, which on a capsize always turn the whole way turtle, but flip over easy enough. I'd seen another test of an Oughtred Tern capsize (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDnk3VU13pM&t=92s) that was extremely heartening because of how hard it seems to be to even get the boat capsized in the first place.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    Look up Fossil Fool on YouTube. He built a boat that is its own trailer and tows it behind a folding bike which then fits into the foredeck. Very slick. he has a build thread here on the forum too.


    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...r-Bike-Sailing
    Thanks! This looks like an absolutely fantastic resource. I don't know that I have the calves to do this with a folding bike like that myself, more power to him.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    for first timers i suggest looking at Jim Michalak's offerings

    https://duckworks.com/sailboats/

    several can be built in the 90# - 200# range w/ his MayFy 14 coming in at the 200# mark

    he offers a book that goes thru many of the things the first timer needs to know

    https://duckworks.com/boatbuilding-f...rs-and-beyond/

    in his book he uses the MayFly 14 as the focus

    https://duckworks.com/mayfly-14-plans/

    this boat has substantial floatation chambers (one fore and one aft) that float the boat well enuff so recovery after capsizing can be readily managed

    add a PolySail sail(actually foats) for her and recovery becomes even easier

    https://www.polysail1.com (the guy's name is Dave Gray and he usually answers the phone)

    kinda depends on what you are looking for in your build

    give the above link(s) a perusal

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Talk to Tony Dias. Harrier would be the best sailing boat, especially in Boston Harbor and beyond.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Hi Erika,
    I have gone through choice paralysis multiple times and have started building my 4th boat, so don't worry, it's normal :-) A few comments/suggestions:-
    1) Plywood differs in weight enormously so if you want a light boat you will probably need to buy good plywood. Personally I use Brunyzeel ply made by Joubert in France (and yes, I buy it in Australia). I love it because a) it planes well and there is a fair amount of planing in a clinker hull b) it's light weight and c) it gives a great finish
    2) My most recent build was an Iain Oughtred Gannet made of 6mm ply which is a planing hull and it is incredibly lightweight - easily less than 100 kilos. I am no build an Oughtred Caledonia Yawl. If I were you I'd have a look at the Gannet.
    3) Not sure how easily you will find a boat trailer that is light enough and strong enough though I'm sure it is popssible. In the case of my Gannet the trailer weighs more than the boat!
    4) I mke a spreadsheet table with all of the relevant factors when trying to make one of these decisions so that theoretically I will make an objective deciision as a result - sometimes works.

    Good Luck Regards Neil

    p.s. a Gannet
    IMG_0228.JPG

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by neil.henderson View Post
    3) Not sure how easily you will find a boat trailer that is light enough and strong enough though I'm sure it is popssible. In the case of my Gannet the trailer weighs more than the boat!
    My plan was to use something like this: https://www.seattlesportsco.com/padd...-cart-tan.html
    and this: https://wicycle.com/products/bike-trailers/smart-stick

    not necessarily those in particular -- I'd prefer a dolly with bicycle-style wheels, and ideally to hitch the towing stick to the rear axle like a more conventional trailer, but that's the general plan.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by Thad View Post
    Talk to Tony Dias. Harrier would be the best sailing boat, especially in Boston Harbor and beyond.
    So I found this image his website: https://antoniodiasadw.files.wordpre...plans-1231.jpg which lists two weights -- 110 lbs "weight" and 610 lbs "displacement".

    I'm still learning, so I'm not sure here -- is that 610 lbs the maximum displacement? As in, the boat + cargo must not weigh more than 610 pounds? Or is the expectation that one would ballast the boat to weigh that for normal sailing? The second would obviously rule out any chance of moving it by bicycle safely. If the Harrier really has a hull weight around 110 lbs though, that would be incredible.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by ErikaK View Post
    So I found this image his website: https://antoniodiasadw.files.wordpre...plans-1231.jpg which lists two weights -- 110 lbs "weight" and 610 lbs "displacement".

    I'm still learning, so I'm not sure here -- is that 610 lbs the maximum displacement? As in, the boat + cargo must not weigh more than 610 pounds? Or is the expectation that one would ballast the boat to weigh that for normal sailing? The second would obviously rule out any chance of moving it by bicycle safely. If the Harrier really has a hull weight around 110 lbs though, that would be incredible.
    " displacement" can unfortunately be used a couple different ways, but likely in this case is that the hull weighs 110 pounds and the designed water line is with 500 additional pounds of people and gear (and perhaps the weight of the sailing rig too). The boat will simply float higher and maybe be a tiny bit tippier when carrying less than the 500 pounds.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    110# for a 17' boat sounds like a lightly built hull, IMO. Add spars, running rigging, sails, foils etc.
    Again, my uneducated guess.
    ​​♦ During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Hallo Erika
    I have a Whilly Tern, built as to the plans, with fore and aft bouancy tanks. The hull weighs, with rudder and c/board, 70kg, the gunter sloop rig adds a bit more, but is quite light. It is a very agile boat and tacks quickly.
    If I did it again, I would install the side tanks instead of the seats, to reduce the internal volume in event of capsize. I installed the motor well, but fit a watertight hull plug when at sea (used a thin saw to cut the aperture in the hull, then a backing ply on the cut out bit, that is held down, so the hull is fair) River trips I use the engine, as sailing is tricky with all the trees and fishermen...
    On camping, sleeping on the boat would be difficult due to the centre cross bench, though you might be able to lay under it, alongside the c/board case, if small.
    We did mod a friend's boat to have half the bench bolted in place, removable to allow sleeping.

    An occasional poster here trails his Mirror Dinghy behind his pedal bike, no electric. Lives in a flat bit of Germany, close to water. Forget his name, but will look. A member of the Dinghy Cruising Ass, cruises her Mirror and sleeps under a boom tent. There are some videos. Mary Dooley might find her.

    Iain Oughtred's plans are works of art, the best I have seen. His book on glued ply construction is a must, which ever boat you decide on.

    To add: I used occume 6mm ply for the hull and Resoltech resins, one of which is a water based coating resin that I gave the hull three coats of. Very smooth, looks varnished. Need to store the boat out of the sun though..or paint/varnish over for UV protection. Time to build was late Oct to Mid May, including sails and trailer, in evenings and w/end time.
    Last edited by Andrew2; 09-25-2021 at 01:27 AM.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew2 View Post
    ......Iain Oughtred's plans are works of art, the best I have seen. His book on glued ply construction is a must......
    Do you have a link, Andrew, or just the title?

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    I can see the appeal to trail a boat with a bicycle. And it is probably doable to push a light boat in the water. It is puzzling, though - at least with the slips we have in this part of the world - how you will be able to pull it out...

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike-in-Suffolk View Post
    Do you have a link, Andrew, or just the title?
    Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual https://www.amazon.com/dp/0937822612

    Quote Originally Posted by entrenous71 View Post
    I can see the appeal to trail a boat with a bicycle. And it is probably doable to push a light boat in the water. It is puzzling, though - at least with the slips we have in this part of the world - how you will be able to pull it out...
    There's a public boat ramp on the Mystic 3/4 of a mile from me, where I planned to both enter and exit the water. My thought was to gently beach the boat onto the ramp, then tip it over sideways a bit to get the dolly under it, then tip it back upright and strap it on. Is that not going to work?

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike-in-Suffolk View Post
    Do you have a link, Andrew, or just the title?
    You have the link now! I lent mine to a close friend to build his Elfyn, so not to hand.

    Thinking about tilting the boat to get the dolly under... might be bit tricky, if you can connect the tow bar to the dolly, maybe with light ally tube, it would be easy to float her on.
    I built a suitable trolly for a Nestaway sectioned boat, about the same length, with plain bearing plastic wheels and all ally frame. Weighed about 5kg, tops. Would be OK to tow behind a cycle, as not subject to suspension and other regs?
    Last edited by Andrew2; 09-25-2021 at 06:03 AM.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by ErikaK View Post
    Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual https://www.amazon.com/dp/0937822612.....
    Merci beaucoup.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew2 View Post
    Would be OK to tow behind a cycle, as not subject to suspension and other regs?
    At least here in Mass, not sure about other states, there's basically no rules about bike trailers aside from that they be "properly attached to the bicycle [and] allow for firm control"

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Welcome aboard!
    You might also look for a boatyard or boat club at which to store your boat on the waterfront. Some yards will dry store the boat and launch on request, others have ramps where you might launch the boat with a dolly. Then you could bike to and from the boat without a trailer. That expands your options a bit. If you want to winter the boat at home you would only have to move it twice a year.
    Good luck, keep us posted.

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    Default

    A trailer that works like a dolly might be easiest, decouple from the bike then roll into the water until the boat floats off. The trailer and wheel bearings would have to be saltwater capable.
    Fossilfools wheels now sound even better. He built sockets into the boat for the wheels. Just roll the boat into the water and climb aboard. Reach over the side to remove the wheels, and store in the boat until return.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    While there have been frequent ideas about adding wheels to boats as an alternative to trailers. Very few catch on, if any? Compromises the design for sailing and probably adds weight. Not what is needed here.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by ErikaK View Post
    At least here in Mass, not sure about other states, there's basically no rules about bike trailers aside from that they be "properly attached to the bicycle [and] allow for firm control"
    Trailers very common here.. Usually attached to the rear axle with a curve to miss the wheel when turning. Others have a swan neck to a point just behind the saddle.
    Usually with young children in, or pets.

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    When it comes to man- or woman-handling a boat, there is a difference between what is do-able and what you will want to do on a regular basis. If you want to go sailing freqently with a bicycle-trailed boat, I'd suggest a hull weight of under 100 pounds. That will be the weight you have to move into the water by hand; the addition of spars, oars, etc. will add to what you pull on the trailer.
    I will beg you for advice, your reply will be concise, and I will listen very nicely and then go out and do exactly what I want! (Apologies to Lerner and Lowe.)

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    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by alkorn View Post
    When it comes to man- or woman-handling a boat, there is a difference between what is do-able and what you will want to do on a regular basis. If you want to go sailing freqently with a bicycle-trailed boat, I'd suggest a hull weight of under 100 pounds. That will be the weight you have to move into the water by hand; the addition of spars, oars, etc. will add to what you pull on the trailer.
    Absolutely, the lighter the better. I was operating under the (false?) assumption that I'd need a boat of a certain minimum size and displacement to operate with some safety in the ocean. Do you have any recommendations for sub-100 pound boats that would do well and be safe in coastal waters?
    Last edited by ErikaK; 09-25-2021 at 07:46 PM.

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    Seattle
    Posts
    27,714

    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by ErikaK View Post
    Absolutely, the lighter the better. I was operating under the (false?) assumption that I'd need a boat of a certain minimum size and displacement to operate with some safety in the ocean. Do you have any recommendations for sub-100 pound boats that would do well and be safe in coastal waters?
    Have you considered skin on frame?
    http://gentrycustomboats.com/Melonseed.html
    Last edited by johnw; 09-25-2021 at 09:03 PM.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Have a look at Sand Dollar by Arch Davis and call him with your concerns. I do not know that particular boat but Arch is a great help for first-time builders

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Aquitaine
    Posts
    1,912

    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by entrenous71 View Post
    I can see the appeal to trail a boat with a bicycle. And it is probably doable to push a light boat in the water. It is puzzling, though - at least with the slips we have in this part of the world - how you will be able to pull it out...
    Going back to weight. My WT trailer is 70kg, not built to be particulaly light, but fully suspended for long trips with coils and shocks. But, I can launch and retrieve the boat on slips by hand, so a much lighter trailer would do easily.
    My rig is probably a bit heavier than the alternative lug, so some savings there too. We also have to carry things like anchors and stuff to conform to regs. All adds up.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    880

    Default Re: Choice Paralysis: First time builder trying to choose plans within constraints

    73620052-C6C1-4571-9BAC-4D925B3CF157.jpg
    This works well. Basically just a dolly under the boat and a hitch that attaches to the bow. Works a treat.

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