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Thread: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Wongawallan Oz
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    Default Re: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

    Nice job on your first effort, well done. For your next one you might consider working it on the full length of stock rather than trying to hold it with tongs, shaping the second/inside flat for the screw hole would form the outside flat for the one that you do after that. I find for small pieces and for things like building up Damascus billets that using either the stock length or a welded on piece of mild steel bar is easier to manage than tongs.

    I made my first ever pair of tongs (without having any tongs to make them) by forging both ends on one length of stock and then drawing out the stock one end at a time - using a welding glove to hold it.

    These fairleads would also make good rowlock bases.

    And you were right with Nitric acid, you can use either for passivation. I use Nitric and I use hydrofluoric for pickling.

    A really good polishing will also help with durability. The smoother you can get it and the cleaner you can get it from the outset - ie removing impurities from working it - the better it will last.
    Larks

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  2. #37
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    May 2000
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    Default Re: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

    Thanks!

  3. #38
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    Oct 2008
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    Default Re: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Nice job on your first effort, well done. For your next one you might consider working it on the full length of stock rather than trying to hold it with tongs, shaping the second/inside flat for the screw hole would form the outside flat for the one that you do after that. I find for small pieces and for things like building up Damascus billets that using either the stock length or a welded on piece of mild steel bar is easier to manage than tongs.

    I made my first ever pair of tongs (without having any tongs to make them) by forging both ends on one length of stock and then drawing out the stock one end at a time - using a welding glove to hold it.

    These fairleads would also make good rowlock bases.

    And you were right with Nitric acid, you can use either for passivation. I use Nitric and I use hydrofluoric for pickling.

    A really good polishing will also help with durability. The smoother you can get it and the cleaner you can get it from the outset - ie removing impurities from working it - the better it will last.
    The surfaces that the line bears on needs to be well-rounded and given a high shine any way, or it will eat the line.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    677

    Default Re: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

    I fabricated all the stainless fittings for the rig of a small bermuda rigged salboat only a few weeks ago. Taught by my uncle who manufactured high end stainless steel fittings for Nautor (plastic sailboats sold under the brand Swan) for 50 years or so.

    Using a separate set of grinding disks that have never touched ordinary iron is paramount. Stainless steel is stainless only because of the chrome-nickel oxide layer on the surface and with too many iron fragments baked into the surface it is not stainless anymore.
    Stainless steel is roughly as difficult to forge as spring steel. It must not be overheated and it's strength and ductility are improved by slow cooling in the coke heap close to the fire.
    Soot and other encrustations give rise to rust so after forging or electrical welding or whatever the surface must either be ground clean or treated with acid.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2021
    Location
    SW Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    42

    Default Re: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Nice job on your first effort, well done. For your next one you might consider working it on the full length of stock ...
    These fairleads would also make good rowlock bases.
    Great suggestion - I had thought about using the full length but it was just a little too long/heavy. I love the rowlock base idea though, the Caravelle I'm building was originally meant to be a 1 or 2 person row boat, so I might cut off enough material for 6 of them and forge them all out, then just cut between them to get the finished pieces. Should be much easier to manage, especially with some bolt jaw tongs, which would allow me to hold things further inside the piece rather than just the itsy bitsy outside!

    Cleats forged in pairs would also benefit from the same approach!

    Quote Originally Posted by heimlaga View Post
    I fabricated all the stainless fittings for the rig of a small bermuda rigged salboat only a few weeks ago.
    That's really cool! I do prefer forging stuff because the process appeals to me so much, but I know how useful fabrication can be. Alas, only so much money or space for tools! I'll probably end up buying things like rudder fittings which need a lot more precision


    Quote Originally Posted by heimlaga View Post
    Soot and other encrustations give rise to rust so after forging or electrical welding or whatever the surface must either be ground clean or treated with acid.
    I'll buy a sandpaper grinder disc for the rest of the process, I think, and probably use acid also Do you have a sense of relatively efficacy of one versus the other? Just curious whether grinding with a stainless-only disc after forging would be an absolute necessity. I know I'll end up forgetting about the disc being stainless-only or it'll get some iron shavings on it at one point or another...
    ~ocean (they/them)

  6. #41
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Townsend, Wa.
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    840

    Default Re: Forging hardware with 316/316L stainless

    Quote Originally Posted by ocean View Post
    Interesting suggestion!

    Also interesting! I thought a bit about it, but I guess I was thrown off a little by not having nearly enough information to know how to proceed. Do you have any sources on making wooden fittings? Particular types of wood, forms, tools, etc? My boat will be a 14' plywood skiff. Should I be concerned by needing larger fittings in wood than I might need in steel?

    Thanks in advance for any pointers towards more information!
    If you live in Pa. get some black locust. It's really tough and it finishes such that some call it American teak. Or get Osage Orange, I don't know if it grows in your area, but one of those square rig reproductions that was built in the East used grown futtocks of Osage so they got a lot of it somewhere. I made my belaying pins of Osage and Black locust. Unfinished Osage darkens in the sun to a color similar to mahogany. I think either wood would be stronger than mahogany, and both are legend for rot resistance. Osage is very dense and immensely strong. Accounts have it that "in the day" a good osage bow would trade straight up for a horse plus saddle. I understand that locust is biologically related to legumes or something, whether that is true or not you can imagine that kind of stringy strength when you work with it: If you try hard enough to break a piece it will sort-of start to delaminate and split but I doubt it would never just abruptly snap. Have fun!

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