View Poll Results: Is your blade guard properly installed?

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  • Yes, guard is in place

    10 19.61%
  • No, it gets in the way

    41 80.39%
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Thread: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    "Driftless" Wisconsin
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    822

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by George Jung View Post
    Push sticks. I always look at my setup before I start, with the question 'is there something stoopid about this set up? How is this damn saw going to try and hurt me today?'
    Good philosophy there.

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    78,065

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    I meant to agree with oz about the push-sticks. The very best are what he describes.

    Most effect because of a longer fore/aft contact footprint. Safer because of the ergonomics. Quite easy to make. Nothing else is close.

    For me... the finger-boards are only deployed infrequently, for specialized sorts of cuts. And if it's a large number of such cuts, I'll look to the power-feeder first.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    St. Paul, MN, USA
    Posts
    60,507

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Here's my standard push stick pattern, made out of leftover plywood bits. Seems to work pretty well, zero cost and disposable.

    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    78,065

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    Here's my standard push stick pattern, made out of leftover plywood bits. Seems to work pretty well, zero cost and disposable.

    That's the critter. I make mine a tad more convex around the top edge, but that's not critical. And I do add a slight hollow in the middle of that foot run, to be sure that I've got contact out at the nose. Also not strictly necessary, if that cut is dead straight. What I DON'T want is any rocking.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    39,292

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Biesemeyer still in business?



    In 1995 the business was acquired by Delta Manufacturing Co., who continue to manufacture the Biesemeyer line of fences until at least 2011 when Delta was acquired by a Taiwanese company and subsequently went bankrupt.Jan 26, 2021





    Well, spit!!

    I have a Biesemeyer manual from back in the 80s that says in bold print on the cover:

    'If you have ANY problems with the materials or workmanship of this product, call Bill Biesemeyer at: (Phone number gone into some hidey-hole in my brain pan . . . )'

    I will say that the FIRST THING Delta did in their quest for money uber alles was to eliminate the parallax cursor on the fence and substitute a splotch of black paint.

    If you have experienced both, you know what's what.

    4B1BC7EC-8267-42A2-9EB3-A8ACF27F0C3D.jpg

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    "Driftless" Wisconsin
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    822

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    'K, youse asked for it, here's the visuals -

    Left side, from front & back:
    Front_left.jpg
    Back_Left.jpg

    Then the works somewhat exposed to view:

    Hanger_Plate.jpg

    Getting the base side off for a more complete view below this one is a PITA.
    Otherwise I'd show it. That 1/2" aluminum plate's the hanger; I had a local machine shop cut away the useless stuff on the trunnion frame into which the previous iteration had its blade guard mount fitted to. That all got in the way of my desire to close off this part of the table base.

    The motor itself's bolted to a heavy commercial door hinge that's in turn bolted to the aluminum plate as a pivot.

    From the right side where I have a Bosch router hung upside down on a side table:

    0-40_Swing.jpg

    Left side shows blade @ 0 where it spends most of its time. Right side shows blade tilted to 40 but the acooling air tube gets pinched any higher. Need to relieve the frame on that side table above & it'd go to 45 no problem.

    Left side base panel removed for cleaning:

    Inside_for_Cleaning.jpg

    I ripped 2 - 8' 2x4's yesterday to 1-1/2" x 7/16" strips for a porch upgrade. Need to vac out the dust that didn't get sucked into the dust collector. I'm careful to do this operation fairly frequently owing to the obvious fire hazard presented by such a fuel supply in an induced draft condition when the collector's running, why the side panel is off for this pic. When I shut the saw & collector off yesterday I wanted to be sure nothing was smokin' inside before I went on to the next part of this particular project. My 'shop' being in the basement of the house we live in now I tend to be more careful.

    What little dust got kicked up off the rip blade continues to be an annoyance (one of those small ShopFox air cleaner's got bolted to the ceiling last year, works great) but I have confidence I'll figure out something eventually, hopefully won't cost what the air cleaner did.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    downward bound
    Posts
    9,328

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    For the little its worth, as far as I can tell many Woodstock products are the same under the paint and name as Wen products and Wen are priced lower when bought from the Wen distributor in Illinois. Similar are also badged Powertec. This was the case for 1/8hp air filter I got last year.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    39,292

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    Here's my standard push stick pattern, made out of leftover plywood bits. Seems to work pretty well, zero cost and disposable.

    That is definitely the one.

    A little hollow in the shoe is good, like DavidG says.

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    39,292

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by sp_clark View Post
    'K, youse asked for it, here's the visuals -

    Left side, from front & back:
    Front_left.jpg
    Back_Left.jpg

    Then the works somewhat exposed to view:

    Hanger_Plate.jpg

    Getting the base side off for a more complete view below this one is a PITA.
    Otherwise I'd show it. That 1/2" aluminum plate's the hanger; I had a local machine shop cut away the useless stuff on the trunnion frame into which the previous iteration had its blade guard mount fitted to. That all got in the way of my desire to close off this part of the table base.

    The motor itself's bolted to a heavy commercial door hinge that's in turn bolted to the aluminum plate as a pivot.

    From the right side where I have a Bosch router hung upside down on a side table:

    0-40_Swing.jpg

    Left side shows blade @ 0 where it spends most of its time. Right side shows blade tilted to 40 but the acooling air tube gets pinched any higher. Need to relieve the frame on that side table above & it'd go to 45 no problem.

    Left side base panel removed for cleaning:

    Inside_for_Cleaning.jpg

    I ripped 2 - 8' 2x4's yesterday to 1-1/2" x 7/16" strips for a porch upgrade. Need to vac out the dust that didn't get sucked into the dust collector. I'm careful to do this operation fairly frequently owing to the obvious fire hazard presented by such a fuel supply in an induced draft condition when the collector's running, why the side panel is off for this pic. When I shut the saw & collector off yesterday I wanted to be sure nothing was smokin' inside before I went on to the next part of this particular project. My 'shop' being in the basement of the house we live in now I tend to be more careful.

    What little dust got kicked up off the rip blade continues to be an annoyance (one of those small ShopFox air cleaner's got bolted to the ceiling last year, works great) but I have confidence I'll figure out something eventually, hopefully won't cost what the air cleaner did.
    That is LOVELY!

    Thanks for the pics!

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    19,130

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Dont worry about the horse being blind, just load the wagon!

  11. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    "Driftless" Wisconsin
    Posts
    822

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    That is LOVELY!

    Thanks for the pics!
    Thanks for the compliment! Glad you like it!

    It works - for what it is - and I have a few ideas about what to add next that might improve it. In its current state it's served me well for just over a year. Adding a large cyclonic separator to the dust collector blower I bought about the same time as the table saw helped greatly too making dust & chip collection vastly more efficient over what I was getting from a RIGID shop-vac alone.

    Before we Escaped from Illinois I had a shop in a garage (that had seen a vehicle parked in it for a brake pad change for all of about four hours during the 37 years we lived at that address) and didn't care much about collecting dust.

    It took care of itself it did.

    When I pulled more panels off today to grab those pics it was in mind to suss out whether some manner of collection orifice could be fixed to the bottom of the blade holder, the better to catch waste nearer the point of its creation. Remains to be seen if I can get enough air flow at that point, of sufficient velocity to overcome the speed of the airstream carrying dust & chips in the blade gullets, and still have a flexible hose attached so the blade carrier can move through the 45 arc I need ever so seldom.

  12. #82
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    18,879

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    This thread validates my habit of removing the guard from every angle grinder I've ever used.

  13. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    "Driftless" Wisconsin
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    822

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Does anyone raise and lower the blade for each cut, so it just peeks through the material?
    Yes, but it's better to have maybe the gullets exposed to their full depth. This way the teeth aren't inclined to bind quite as much as they're not in almost constant contact with the workpiece on either side of the cut. If you have some means of dust collection above the exposed blade there's more air flow that can improve dust mitigation as well.

  14. #84
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    Sep 2015
    Location
    "Driftless" Wisconsin
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    822

    Default Re: Tablesaw blade guard: a survey

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    The dust collection should be under the table at the leading edge of the blade.

    Maybe a piece of 2" PVC with a clearance slot for the blade?
    I have to thank you for this post. It's motivated me to think more on this subject; posting pics of what I've done to my venerable Craftsman-with-the-cast-iron-table saw over the years was the least I could offer in return.

    I tend to favor conductive materials where dust is being passed in any quantity. That way static electricity can be dissipated so my choice for such an accessory might be aluminum tube of some kind, or even thin galvanized sheet bent to fit.

    The former'd give way with less force if something somehow gets drawn down by the blade, the latter might tend to get caught up. PVC may tend to collect dust, be more inclined to clog, and will shatter upon sudden impact. (I may even have some thin copper flashing around....) If I follow through on this I'll return here, post a couple more pics.

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