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Thread: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

  1. #1
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    Default Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Hey, gang. Long time since I've been around. Life ya know. A growing young family with a son on the Spectrum and career demands have kept me away for a few years. But, I'm back and motivated to get a build started.

    Before I went into the fog, we were here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...nker-or-Carvel

    I'm still greatly interested in a traditional build with minimal epoxy, but life requirements have somewhat changed. So I may step back and consider a minimum-pox build eventually.

    Anyway... I'm now solidly in Pennsylvania and we've been spending quite a few weeks each year along the coast... Maine several times, New Hampshire, Connecticut. Samantha's family is in CT and we 'vacationed' this year in New London. 20 people. In one house. 10 of whom were 6 years old or younger. This appears as if it's going to be an annual event. 7-10 days with my extended family somewhere along the New England coast. 15 growing kids counting the handful that didn't make New London this year. Time to have a boat.

    Rather than discuss particular boat options, I'd like to gather some thoughts and opinions on traditional working small boat rigs from New England or the Maritimes that would work well for modern recreational use. Trailered centerboard boat. Figure 2 adults and two or three kids aboard for day sailing. 4 along for an overnight. Preferably an un-stayed rig. Oars as auxiliary. And we should consider the need to single hand. 19th century working tech for 21st century play.

    Sort of pick a sail rig, then match a hull sort of exercise.

    I have been thinking on this for a LONG time and have some ideas, but wanted to see what the collected knowledge of the forum can contribute. Thanks in advance.

    R

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    12DC6596-F2C9-4660-A828-A658237FDD3E.jpg
    12DC6596-F2C9-4660-A828-A658237FDD3E.jpg
    Balanced Lugs are popular amongst my friends and myself here on the Texas Coast. Traditional for sure, easy to hoist and manage, powerful, and you can buy a good one easily. Is it New England traditional or more England traditional I wont get into that. 4 people and a rowing boat, I would think you would want two rowing stations.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Lugsails! Yep, that's the first traditional rig I'd look at for ease of handling and simplicity. But, as Matt suggested, the equivalent traditional rigs on the east coast would be spritsails, not lugsails.

    Also, overnighting 4 people? That'll take a big boat.

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 09-10-2021 at 08:15 PM.
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Rather than discuss particular boat options, I'd like to gather some thoughts and opinions on traditional working small boat rigs from New England or the Maritimes that would work well for modern recreational use. Trailered centerboard boat. Figure 2 adults and two or three kids aboard for day sailing. 4 along for an overnight. Preferably an un-stayed rig. Oars as auxiliary. And we should consider the need to single hand. 19th century working tech for 21st century play.

    Sort of pick a sail rig, then match a hull sort of exercise.

    I have been thinking on this for a LONG time and have some ideas, but wanted to see what the collected knowledge of the forum can contribute. Thanks in advance.

    R

    traditional gaff rigged catboat, 16' with an 8' beam
    small cuddy two sleep in the cuddy
    two sleep in the cockpit
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Thanks fellas. Good start for discussion.

    Tom and Matt - I like lug sails well enough and I really like yawls. But as you say, lugs weren’t prevalent on working boats along the eastern seaboard of North America.

    Neither were yawls, at least that I can find evidence for. Which is a bit baffling for me. As a former gillnetter, I appreciate a clear deck for working gear. A cat-yawl can give you all the space in the world to work without unstepping a mast. More so than the endemic ketch that seems to have been the two-mast rig for small craft. For modern recreational daysailing or costal cruising in an open boat, yawls seem to have a lot going for them. The oar-and-sail guys make intelligent and impassioned arguments for the rig. And I’m sort of obsessed with the French jib-headed lug yawls that were traditional fishing rigs and are now popular recreational rigs on boats like the Vivier Ebihen 16.

    But, you know… European rather than North American. Unless there was a jibbed spritsail yawl rig on an undiscovered Noman’s Land boat out there…

    Why no yawls?!

    Let’s ignore overnights for now. It would be two adults and two littles among the islands, but still a big ask unless going ashore in a tent. Two aboard under a boom tent maybe…

    Anyway… Paul, a couple of open cat-rigged boats are being thought about. A small cuddy would certainly be nice, but not necessary. Catboats have a lot of advantages for sure. Especially for having a couple kiddos aboard. I don’t have any experience with gaffers so I’m not sure about rigging when trailer sailing. Maybe the smaller ones are handier than they look. I’ve looked long at the Woods Hole boats, dismissed them for any number of reasons, and then come back to them. Boomless sprit? Add a boom, sprit boom or whisker pole?

    hmmm…

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    I wonder if you'd consider a design by an Australian or Frenchman? I would suggest having a look at the Caledonia Yawl designed by Iain Oughtred (Australian born, lives on Isle of Skye) and the Jewell designed by Francois Vivier. I have started to build a Caledonia Yawl but took a long hard look at the Jewell. I think people daysail and/or cruise in both Jewells and CYs. Jewell has the advantage of a small cabin. Both can carry an outboard - both can be yawl rigged which is a rig I really want to try.
    Good luck with your choice.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Thanks fellas. Good start for discussion.

    Tom and Matt - I like lug sails well enough and I really like yawls. But as you say, lugs weren’t prevalent on working boats along the eastern seaboard of North America.

    Neither were yawls, at least that I can find evidence for. Which is a bit baffling for me. As a former gillnetter, I appreciate a clear deck for working gear. A cat-yawl can give you all the space in the world to work without unstepping a mast. More so than the endemic ketch that seems to have been the two-mast rig for small craft. For modern recreational daysailing or costal cruising in an open boat, yawls seem to have a lot going for them. The oar-and-sail guys make intelligent and impassioned arguments for the rig. And I’m sort of obsessed with the French jib-headed lug yawls that were traditional fishing rigs and are now popular recreational rigs on boats like the Vivier Ebihen 16.

    But, you know… European rather than North American. Unless there was a jibbed spritsail yawl rig on an undiscovered Noman’s Land boat out there…

    Why no yawls?!

    Let’s ignore overnights for now. It would be two adults and two littles among the islands, but still a big ask unless going ashore in a tent. Two aboard under a boom tent maybe…

    Anyway… Paul, a couple of open cat-rigged boats are being thought about. A small cuddy would certainly be nice, but not necessary. Catboats have a lot of advantages for sure. Especially for having a couple kiddos aboard. I don’t have any experience with gaffers so I’m not sure about rigging when trailer sailing. Maybe the smaller ones are handier than they look. I’ve looked long at the Woods Hole boats, dismissed them for any number of reasons, and then come back to them. Boomless sprit? Add a boom, sprit boom or whisker pole?

    hmmm…
    Perhaps a Mackinaw boat, or a Collingwood skiff? Ketch rig (gaff or spritsails), large enough for a family maybe. Traditional for the Great Lakes.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Hi, Tom. Thanks for that great article. I enjoyed it tremendously. Especially the references to the gillnet fishery on the lakes.

    I’ve always admired the smaller Mackinaw boats around 18’. They’re handsome craft and I ponder them often. If you have sailed the rig, I’d love to hear your experiences with it. I wonder specifically about how it could be single-handed, if the ketch arrangement works for daysailing with family in an open boat, and how a loose-footed mainsail works with a boomed mizzen. I think a gaff-rigged Mackinaw is probably a lot of boat to trailer (not to mention build!) but I’m interested nonetheless. I believe some were rigged with spritsails on unstayed masts as well…

    Neil, I have no prejudices against designers from any nation. In fact, at one point I was certain I would build a traditional lapstrake Ebihen 16 with a bourcet-malet rig. I even corresponded with M. Vivier and have study plans for the traditional construction of the boat. And Oughtred… there have been several of his designs in consideration. I think a traditional clinker Penny Fee would be great! Chances are good that I’ll end up building and enjoying a boat drawn by a living designer with a less esoteric sail plan to actually go sailing in… rather than building a museum boat. I’m just curious about 19th century North American sail rigs as ‘practical’ modern setups right now.

    To give you an idea of how impractical I can be… my daily driver is a 1963 Oldsmobile Cutlass. My ‘new’ truck is 43 years old. And when I decided I wanted to fish with bamboo fly rods, I started building my own from scratch… AND designing and making the machines to make the rods. Ha.

    So… how does a boomed spritsail catboat sail? How about a Matinicus double-ender yawl with a loose-footed sprit main, whisker pole, jib, and leg-of-mutton mizzen?

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Without resorting to a boom tent, that's a testing brief. However, I'd point you towards a Whisstock #123 4 berth gaff yawl as one which seems to fit the bill. You might also look at his #165. The designer, George Whisstock, posts here regularly as Debenriver, and you can see how much input he is prepared to give by having a look at my current thread about a potential #146 build.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    "But, you know… European rather than North American. Unless there was a jibbed spritsail yawl rig on an undiscovered Noman’s Land boat out there…

    Why no yawls?! RyanGilnet

    Maybe the working boat were fishing off the stern sometimes, running lines, pulling nests and dredging.

    Paul Fisher's Highlander 18 looks like a good fit, sprit yawl. A good looking design as well, and probably a good size for your needs. Can be built with or without the cuddy.

    https://duckworks.com/highlander-18-plans/

    CC385A5B-C57E-4A22-980C-1B5923C7DA2B.gif
    Last edited by Matt young; 09-11-2021 at 07:20 AM.
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    "Why no yawls?!" ......


    I posted about one previously. Seems a good fit for the traditional sail-plan part of the OP's requirements.

    Paul Fisher's Highlander 18 looks like a good fit, sprit yawl
    He wants 4 berths, which is testing in a sailer trailer.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Hi, Tom. Thanks for that great article. I enjoyed it tremendously. Especially the references to the gillnet fishery on the lakes.

    I’ve always admired the smaller Mackinaw boats around 18’. They’re handsome craft and I ponder them often. If you have sailed the rig, I’d love to hear your experiences with it. I wonder specifically about how it could be single-handed, if the ketch arrangement works for daysailing with family in an open boat, and how a loose-footed mainsail works with a boomed mizzen. I think a gaff-rigged Mackinaw is probably a lot of boat to trailer (not to mention build!) but I’m interested nonetheless. I believe some were rigged with spritsails on unstayed masts as well…
    I also think I've read about spritsails on Mackinaw boats. I've never sailed with a Mackinaw boat. I do remember (I think) that WoodenBoat or Small Boats reviewed the Nelson Zimmer 18' Mackinaw boat (gaff ketch) a few years back. I think the gist of the review of the rig was, if you want a LOT of strings to pull to keep people busy, it's a great rig. I think there may have even been the conclusion that the rig was a contender for the "most strings to pull per sq ft of sail area" award.

    As for the ketch rig's tendency to take up cockpit space, I sail a smaller design (Don Kurylko's Alaska) which features a boomless standing lugsail ketch rig:

    Alaska Plans.jpg

    Even before I finished the build, I opted to leave out the mizzen entirely (there's a third mast step in the center for sailing with mainsail alone, still balanced). Mostly that was for simplicity (single sail, single sheet; no need to mess with double mainsheets; no need to build a second mast; etc), but I have to say that it sure opens up a lot of cockpit lounging space which I appreciate:

    44.JPG

    The open cockpit improves fore-and-aft trim because you can slide farther forward, as in the photo above.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike-in-Suffolk View Post
    [/COLOR][/I]I posted about one previously. Seems a good fit for the traditional sail-plan part of the OP's requirements.
    [/COLOR]
    [FONT=arial][COLOR=#333333]

    He wants 4 berths, which is testing in a sailer trailer.
    Mike, my "why no yawls" quote was from the Ryan's question about why no yawls in traditional East Coast boats. Yes you did make some good suggestions.
    I believe, maybe, he is looking for boom tent sleeping and/or small cuddy, the Highlander 18 can put 2 in the cuddy and two under a boom tent, although there is no boom in the arrangement image I posted.
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    How about a Matinicus double-ender yawl with a loose-footed sprit main, whisker pole, jib, and leg-of-mutton mizzen?
    Now you're describing Tim Yeadon's boat, Big Food, kind of. He started with a boomless spritsail, then moved to a yawl rig with an 85 sq ft (I think) balance lug mainsail, and a 20-ish sq ft leg-of-mutton mizzen. No jib, no whisker pole. But it's a Matinicus double-ender.

    Yeadon and a few other sail-and-oar cruisers used to post here a lot, but they've been on virtual radio silence for a while. If you do a Google search for "woodenboat forum big food" you'll find lots of threads about his boat, and the conversion from spritsail to lug yawl. I think his conclusion is that the lug rig is far superior for his purposes.

    But, that's a very small boat! No way you'd get a family of 4 sailing in a Matinicus double-ender, I think. Tim himself built a bigger boat, the very first Hvalsoe 18 (also a lug yawl--see the pattern? Guys who really get out there cruising small boats and know what they're doing choose lug yawls, it seems).

    Tom
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    ......I believe, maybe, he is looking for boom tent sleeping and/or small cuddy, the Highlander 18 can put 2 in the cuddy and two under a boom tent, although there is no boom in the arrangement image I posted.
    Ah, well two under a boom tent opens all sorts of possibilities. With that as an option, the smaller boats in George's range (#119 and #146, which are both 3 berth), come into play. So do a number of Gartside boats. Also, Evening Swan, White Swan, and Ptarmigan 17 from Selway Fisher.

    Also Ian Oughtred's Eun na Mara and Wee Seal. Really really pretty double enders.
    Last edited by Mike-in-Suffolk; 09-11-2021 at 07:47 AM.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Question about balanced lugsails as appearing in #2. I sailed a Dovekie for over a decade and loved her leg-o-mutton sprit sail (triangular instead of quadrilateral). However, various people were critical of the way a Dovekie's sprit would "spoil" the shape of the sail on a tack with the sprit pressing on the lee side of the sail. Really, this observation was heard often. However, when it comes to balanced lugsails as appearing in #2 above, the mast indeed "spoils" the sail's shape when on a tack with the mast on the lee side, yet nobody seems to care. In #12, with the sail's tack secured to the mast instead of projecting out forward, the mast hardly affects the shape of the sail. But either way, I've never heard the observation that the mast "spoils" the shape of a lugsail. What gives? Does a balanced lugsail perform so well that folks just overlook the so called "spoiled" shape?

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    "But, you know… European rather than North American. Unless there was a jibbed spritsail yawl rig on an undiscovered Noman’s Land boat out there…

    Why no yawls?! RyanGilnet

    Maybe the working boat were fishing off the stern sometimes, running lines, pulling nests and dredging.
    That’s something I’ve been looking into, Matt. The early fisheries seem to mostly have been worked over the side - hand lines, pots, longlines, gill nets, drift nets, tonging. Mostly single mast rigs or ketch-rigged for a two-master. Interesting research.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    Question about balanced lugsails as appearing in #2. I sailed a Dovekie for over a decade and loved her leg-o-mutton sprit sail (triangular instead of quadrilateral). However, various people were critical of the way a Dovekie's sprit would "spoil" the shape of the sail on a tack with the sprit pressing on the lee side of the sail. Really, this observation was heard often. However, when it comes to balanced lugsails as appearing in #2 above, the mast indeed "spoils" the sail's shape when on a tack with the mast on the lee side, yet nobody seems to care. In #12, with the sail's tack secured to the mast instead of projecting out forward, the mast hardly affects the shape of the sail. But either way, I've never heard the observation that the mast "spoils" the shape of a lugsail. What gives? Does a balanced lugsail perform so well that folks just overlook the so called "spoiled" shape?
    Michael Storer (designer of the Goat Island Skiff) has done a lot of work with lugsail performance. I think his conclusion, based on firsthand data from lots of racing, is that the "bad" tack of a balance lugsail actually performs better than the "good" tack. I believe him, but don't care much as I'm neither a racer nor a type A constant sail control fidgeter.

    Tom
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike-in-Suffolk View Post
    He wants 4 berths, which is testing in a sailer trailer.
    Actually, I guess I wasn’t too clear. I’ll eventually build an open boat, possibly with a very small cuddy. No ‘berths’. Sleeping beneath a boom tent or going ashore to camp. Sorry about the unintended misdirection!!

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Tom… ah! You’re that Tom. I just subscribed to Small Boats partly to read up on your adventures with your Alaska. That boat and Myst really worth considering. You’re build decisions are really interesting to me - forgoing the ketch immediately and keeping the standing lug. What’s your experience been with the standing lug? Quite a few rigs I’ve been looking at are boomless, either standing lug or sprit. Reading, I note lots of concerns about reefing and running and sail shape and sheeting… how’s it been in actual practice? Does Alaska have enough initial stability to unstep and re-step masts on the water?

    Myst is… a yawl.

    And the Mackinaw Boat certainly looks like a contender for the “most strings award”. It would be fun with an able crew, but tough to singlehand… which is a safety concern for me.

    I had forgotten that Yeardon’s Big Food was a Matinicus double-ender. I’ll need to go back and look up those threads. Need to look up Tom Jackson’s Noman’s Land boat also. I think she’s rigged as a ketch with a balanced lug main…

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    is that the "bad" tack of a balance lugsail actually performs better than the "good" tack.
    man, this is gonna require a dedicated thread. . .
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Scheuer View Post
    But either way, I've never heard the observation that the mast "spoils" the shape of a lugsail. What gives? Does a balanced lugsail perform so well that folks just overlook the so called "spoiled" shape?
    Yes.

    As measured many times using GPS to give velocity made good against a mark dead to windward. No measurable difference in pointing angle or speed on my balanced lug yawl sail and oar boat.
    Alex

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    Does Alaska have enough initial stability to unstep and re-step masts on the water?
    Yes it does, but it's a pain in the butt, with the result in my case that I frequently didn't reduce sail as quickly or as often as I should have. My first sail and oar boat was an Alaska that I built to the original ketch rig design. I eventually ditched the ketch mizzen for a smaller yawl-type mizzen stepped further aft, which reduced overall sail area but was much easier to handle.
    Then I designed and built a somewhat larger sail and oar boat with a balanced lug yawl - my current boat, Fire-Drake.
    Alex

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    I'm no rigging expert. What I can offer comes from sailing with a large boating group, the Coots, for years.

    In fireside chats, and shoreline debates, the impression I get is that the rig that owners seem happiest with is the unstayed balanced lug rig. For a variety of reasons. That doesn't mean that those who sail gaffs or gunters or spritsails hate them. It also seems to depend on which rig you grew up with or were introduced to first. But I'd say there's more people that sail other Coots boats then switch to a balanced lug than with any of the others.
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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by RyanGillnet View Post
    And the Mackinaw Boat certainly looks like a contender for the “most strings award”. It would be fun with an able crew, but tough to singlehand… which is a safety concern for me.
    cat ketch rigged with boomed foresail

    mackinaw_boat_two_rivers_lester_public_library.jpg
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    I can't think of an example of a working craft using a balanced lug.

    Dipping or standing, no problem but not balanced.

    Anyone have such an example?
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Anyone have such an example?
    go east

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    cat ketch rigged with boomed foresail

    mackinaw_boat_two_rivers_lester_public_library.jpg
    ”Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.” - That is simpler, but still complicated enough to be cool. Single sheet lead running to near the mizzen mast step?

    I need to research the reefing schedule on a cat-ketch. The french Bourcet-Malet yawl will balance with jib and mizzen, so it’s possible to just drop the standing lug main if needed. And of course, being a yawl, will weathercock head up with mizzen alone. I wonder what the plan is for a gaff ketch…

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    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    I really like the Kingston Lobster boats .I have to concede that they are ketch rigged ,but they have 3 mast steps .On the occasions when you intend to sleep aboard the mizzen would be left ashore and the mainmast placed in the after step which is just clear of the cockpit .I just looked the rig up . Actually the after sail is called the mainsail and the larger forward sail is the Foresail as on the boat above .. Sprit rigged though.
    Last edited by Bill Perkins; 09-11-2021 at 01:15 PM.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Rockford, IL
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    12,427

    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    (Reply to Wi-Tom and AJZimm)

    Peter Duff, Builder of Dovekie, always said there was no difference in performance concerning whether the sprit "spoiled" the sail's shape or not. None of the boat's owners ever found otherwise.
    Of course that's why Nonesuch boats have the wishbone sprit, so sail shape is optimum on either tack.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Bristol Bay, Alaska; Central Pennsylvania
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    239

    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Perkins View Post
    I really like the Kingston Lobster boats .I have to concede that they are ketch rigged ,but they have 3 mast steps .On the occasions when you intend to sleep aboard the mizzen would be left ashore and the mainmast placed in the after step which is just clear of the cockpit .
    I had quite forgotten that I had the Kingston boats on my research list. Mystic has plans for a Pete Culler drawn boat with the 3rd step. At almost 18’, the ketch rig may work ok for daysailing. I had recently looked at the Moosabec Reach boats. Lovely boats. But at 14’3”, the ketch rig seemed to have things pretty cramped inside. The Kingston ketches have more interior volume. Mizzen might be handy when overnight… brail the sails, stretch a line between masts for a ridge line, drape a tent, and Bob’s yer uncle. Third mast step gives versatility. Something to consider. First small ketch that I can see working for a daysailing/camp cruiser. Great suggestion.

  32. #32
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    Mar 2007
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    Bristol Bay, Alaska; Central Pennsylvania
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    239

    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft


  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Deepest Darkest Wales
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    24,240

    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    Oh look - a junk yawl sailing backwards.
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Atlanta
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    2,421

    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Mystic also has a pair of the original Kingston Lobster boats in their collection ; Annie A Fuller (1872) 15 ft. 8In. by 5ft5in. ; and another unnamed (1890) 19ft.by 6ft. 3 in. Plus they sell the plans .See Ben Fuller's 87 Boat Designs. You can see photos of these boats in Mystic Seaport Watercraft. Annie has 2 rowing stations . The type is said to be fast and row easily. Chapelle writes "very handsome little craft".
    Last edited by Bill Perkins; 09-11-2021 at 01:55 PM.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Conway, MA
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    6,071

    Default Re: Traditional Working Sail Rigs - Modern Recreational Craft

    Sharpie?

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