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Thread: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

  1. #1
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    Default Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    So Iíve been busy fishing and boating rather than building, yet the itch doesnít go away.
    so I have a serious question, how much difference in rowing or sailing performance would I notice Between a goat Island skip and a bluegill?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Nobody has anything to say about this?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    The GIS is very popular, well understood design. My guess is that there are just not that many people familiar with the Bluegill.

    Just glancing over the particulars, it looks like the Bluegill is going to be heavier and a slower sailboat. Specs say 200lbs and it's not clear if that is for the sailing version or just the rowing/motor, vs. the GIS at ~135lbs. Further, the sail area is 82 sqft vs the GIS is 105 sqft. So, probably the Bluegill is a more-or-less typical lightly built skiff, whereas the GIS has become as popular as it has been because it is surprisingly fast (due to light weight and a lot of sail area).

    If I were comparing the two, I'd build the GIS no question -- the community around it (primarily the facebook group) is really good, it's an extremely well understood boat with lots of experimentation, and Storer is a designer who puts a lot into the plans and making them straightforward to use.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Shall I further muddy the waters?

    The Featherwind is yet another simple to build, flat-iron type skiff ( I'm sure there are probably dozens of other designs, too).
    If you are thinking about the GIS, you might want to take a look at this design too.
    There is a thread about it down in the Bilge.

    image084.jpg

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Having built neither, my impression is that Featherwind is much easier to build, and for lack of a better way of saying it, the GIS is a better boat. Whether that performance is worth the extra time, effort, money, is up to you! Both will certainly get you on the water.
    Daniel

    Building a Campion Apple 16.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Aggghhhh! Too many choices and very little time in this life to build! Since I’ve had the plans for the bluegill sitting around and some ply that matches the specs I’m going down that road. I’m sure I will wake up in the early morning with this debate raging in my head.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Aggghhhh! Too many choices and very little time in this life to build! Since I’ve had the plans for the bluegill sitting around and some ply that matches the specs I’m going down that road. I’m sure I will wake up in the early morning with this debate raging in my head.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Here's some Bluegill chatter in an old thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ill-2013-Build

    My take on the designs is that the GIS is optimized more for sailing, and the Bluegill is a traditional skiff that will both row and sail decently, i.e. a better all-around boat. But if you want performance under canvas, then the GIS should be more satisfying. I have a Redmond Whisp, basically a skinny Bluegill, and it rows very nicely. Under sail, one has to be attentive due to the lack of beam. The Bluegill's extra beam would correct this, of course.

    But at the end of the day, the GIS and Bluegill are very similar. If built and rigged as drawn, the GIS has a lot more sail for its weight, which probably has a lot to do with its reputation.
    -Dave

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Dave,

    Thanks for the insight. I need an all around boat more than I need a super sailboat.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Well the two sheets of 3/8” marine ply are now one. I guess I will have to move this to a build thread. It is still a bit unclear how this boat rows but since it is almost always windy here I can just sail it.

    Obsessive searching here lead to some conflicting reports on rowing this design. It seems like it would be tolerable.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    I've had a Bluegill, and built 2 of them. Never been in a GIS, but seen many videos.<br>
    As noted above, the Bluegill is a good all around boat. You can motor it, with up to a 9.9 hp, though even something less than 2 hp is more than plenty to move you about.<br>
    You can row it, get at least 8 foot oars, 8.5 or 9 would be best. It rows pretty nicely. It will try to weathervane a little, since the rower's weight is forward, but you can put some weight in the stern to offset that. The last time I rowed one was into wind and chop, and it was fine. A couple kids were on the stern seat.<br>
    You can sail it, and it will even plane if you catch the right gust downwind. The rig shown is a decent one, and I (and wife) sewed our sail from a Sailrite kit with good success. The rudder is shallow, and I found if there is too much weight in the boat, esp if too much weight aft, it will not want to tack. But it's a handy sailor.<br>
    And most of all, it is a handy boat. Our family (parents, two young girls) spent a whole lot of good messing about time in her. <br>
    <br>
    The only thing I worried about was lack of freeboard. It always seemed to me a little low for truly open waters, but I never really tested it in waves. We used it in fairly sheltered water.<br>
    <br>
    Another odd thing about the BG is that the outboard fits where the rudder goes, so you more or less need to choose between sailor or motoring, no motor-sailing. But you can row with the sail up, so there is "row-sailing." <br>
    <br>
    In short, if you're looking for a boat that will do everything fairly well, the BG is it. I even wrote a letter to WoodenBoat once, nominating it for the perfect skiff.<br>
    <br>
    As to the GIS, from everything I've seen, it is designed to be a performance sailing skiff. Folks use it for sail camping, but basically, folks use it for sailing while hiked out on the rail, from what I can tell. I do not see easy motor attachment on the GIS, though it may be in the plans. I do not see oarlocks or a rowing seat, certainly not a well-designed rowing seat like the BG. <br>
    <br>
    It appears you've started the BG. Congratulations, it's a good boat. When it comes time to bend the topsides into the stem, get plenty of hands and clamps, because the plywood is tortured into place.&nbsp; Try to carve a little flat into the back of each side of the stem to give a clamping space. Otherwise, construction is pretty straightforward and fun.<br>
    <br>
    --pb, Milwaukee, USA

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Bluegill skiff versus Goat?

    Thanks great review!

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